Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Looking Back And Looking Ahead

January 3, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
LOOKING BACK AND LOOKING AHEAD


On the Catholic calendar, Christmas continues through the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord, observed this year on Sunday, January 13. In effect, we're only halfway through the real Christmas season, and if we take the time to pray over the Infancy Narratives in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke, we'll find plenty of reasons to keep the joy of Christmas alive in our hearts.

These Christmas days coincide with the beginning of a new secular year. It's a good moment to look both back and ahead. So much happened in 2012 that it's hard to compress in a single column: a sweeping reorganization of our Catholic schools ministry; a revitalized Catholic Charities Appeal; new seminary leadership; dramatically improved policies that govern the handling of allegations of sexual abuse and misconduct by archdiocesan clergy and staff; an expanded and far more thorough annual archdiocesan financial report; the start of new Catholic education and Catholic community foundations; a successful struggle for "school choice" related funds in the state legislature; a difficult criminal trial; the sale of the cardinal's residence and other key properties; a vigorous new Council of Priests; a first-ever Archdiocesan Pastoral Council; hard but necessary budget and staff cuts; the recruitment of excellent new financial leadership and legal representation.

The list goes on, and it includes the outstanding safety training and ongoing support for sexual abuse victims offered every day by the Office of Child and Youth Protection. It includes the good work of archdiocesan Catholic Human Services and its affiliated ministries. It also includes the situation of priests with past allegations of misconduct placed on administrative leave in 2011. Nearly all of these men had their cases resolved in 2012, thanks in part to the efforts of former prosecutor Gina Maisto Smith and her multidisciplinary team, who have now concluded their work. The few cases that remain await action or clearance by civil authorities before the Archdiocesan Review Board can complete its work and recommendations.

The year ahead will have its own serious challenges. There's no magic cure for the suffering of past abuse victims, the morale of our people and priests, or the gravity of our resource problems. Parish closures and additional budget and staff adjustments can't be avoided, but they always involve intimate pain for good people. We also face difficult cases of abuse-related civil litigation, and the complex legislative issues and harsh media coverage that may follow. At the same time, we have an ongoing need to help victims heal; to rebuild the trust of our people and priests; to restore the financial health of the archdiocese; and to rekindle the apostolic zeal of our ministries.

None of these tasks will be easy. None is guaranteed success. So how can we possibly find "joy" in the midst of such uncertainty?

We can take confidence from the fact that a great deal of good really has been accomplished over the past 12 months. We've come a long way in a short time, not by our own power but by the grace of God and the generous good will that resides in Catholic hearts across this extraordinary local Church of Philadelphia. Many good people have stepped forward to help. Their number will grow as we prove by our actions that the Church is about the work of the Gospel - preaching Jesus Christ and serving God's people without vanity, without privilege; without complacency; but with love, with courage; with humility and candor. That's the Church Jesus Christ founded. That's the Church Philadelphia's own St. John Neumann, whose feast day we celebrate on January 5, served with such passion and self-denial as bishop. That's the Church we need to help God rebuild in our life as a believing community.

Christmas didn't end in late December. It's still alive for anyone who seeks it -- right now, right here, today. Every new child is a gift, an invitation to hope; and the Child born in Bethlehem hasn't disappeared. He's with us in these remaining days of the Christmas season to refresh our hearts and turn us again to service in the coming months. So may God fill us with gratitude for all the compassion he showed to us in 2012, and courage for the work he invites us to in the year ahead. And may God bless all of us in 2013.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Announces Parish Mergers In West Philadelphia Resulting From Pastoral Planning Initiative

January 6, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE ANNOUNCES PARISH MERGERS IN
WEST PHILADELPHIA RESULTING FROM
PASTORAL PLANNING INITIATIVE


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced today that Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has approved the recommendations of the Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee to merge parishes in West Philadelphia.

These mergers are the result of ongoing restructuring that will ultimately strengthen parish communities throughout the Archdiocese positioning them for future growth and sustainability. It is hoped that the result will be revitalized parishes throughout the Archdiocese that are better equipped to meet the spiritual and pastoral needs of future generations.

The recommendations and resulting mergers are an outcome of the Archdiocesan-wide Parish Pastoral Planning Area initiative, which began in 2011. Parishioners at all affected parishes learned of the final decisions through letters mailed to all registered parishioners as well as announcements made at all Masses this weekend.

The mergers announced today were based on a combination of factors, including, but not limited to, demographic shifts in Catholic populations, concentrated density of parishes in a limited geographic area, history of declining Mass attendance and sacramental activity, increasing economic challenges that threaten sustainability, a decrease in the availability of clergy to staff parishes, and a review of facilities.

In each instance, parishioners will attend daily and Sunday Mass at the church of the newly formed parish. The churches of the former parishes will remain open and be maintained as worship sites. At the discretion of the pastor, these sites will be utilized for weddings, funerals and feast days, as well as traditional and ethnic devotions for the duration of at least one year during the transition. Sunday Mass may also be celebrated at a worship site at the discretion of the pastor and the newly formed pastoral council.

All parish property, assets and debts of the former parishes will be assumed by the newly created parishes, which will also be responsible for the care of all sacramental records. The pastors from the merging parishes will form a transitional team made up of lay leaders from each of the merging parishes to assist in moving forward with building the new parish community.

The Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee, made up of lay persons, priests and Archdiocesan personnel, is examining all 256 parishes within the Archdiocese to gauge their viability and assess whether they possess the resources to accomplish their role in the mission of the Church and remain sustainable and vibrant faith communities. Parishes within each pastoral planning area will continue to carefully and thoughtfully examine their viability in order to make future recommendations. Additional parish announcements are expected this spring and in the spring of 2014.

Parish Area Pastoral Planning is designed to be as collaborative and consultative as possible. Its goal is to provide pastors, after consulting their parish leadership, with the opportunity to dialogue with members of the Strategic Planning Committee in providing joint recommendations to the Archbishop for growth and sustainability within their respective geographic areas. Additionally, in the majority of cases, the regional bishop and the dean meet with the pastors as well as their pastoral and finance councils to hear their concerns and receive their recommendations.

The Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee shared all final proposals with the Council of Priests and the College of Consultors for their review before final approval by the Archbishop.

Parish Announcements Effective January 27, 2013:


West Philadelphia:
Saint Callistus Parish (Overbrook/Morris Park) and Our Lady of Lourdes Parish (Overbrook/Morris Park) will merge at the location of and keep the name of Our Lady of Lourdes Parish. The Saint Callistus church will remain as a worship site.

Our Mother of Sorrows Parish (Mill Creek/Dunlop/West Park) and Saint Ignatius of Loyola Parish (Belmont/Mantua/East Park) will merge at the location of and keep the name of Saint Ignatius of Loyola Parish. The Our Mother of Sorrows church will remain as a worship site.

Our Lady of the Blessed Sacrament Parish (Haddington/Caroll Park) and Saint Cyprian Parish (Cobbs Creek) will merge at the location of and keep the name of Saint Cyprian Parish. The Our Lady of the Blessed Sacrament church will remain as a worship site.

Recently, Archbishop Chaput directed that the merger plans for the following parishes receive more input, broader consultation and further study.

West Philadelphia: Saint Barbara (Wynnefield), Saint Donato (Overbrook/Morris Park), and Saint Rose of Lima (Haddington/Carroll Park) Parishes will be studied further beginning later this month. Final decisions are expected by the spring of 2013.

Previous Announcements:


Last year, the Archdiocese announced initial rounds of parish mergers resulting from the Parish Area Pastoral Planning Initiative in Coatesville and Phoenixville in Chester County as well as the Germanton, Harrowgate, and Manayunk sections of Philadelphia. Additional information regarding those mergers can be found at http://archphila.org/conversion/conversion_index.php.

Future Announcements:


In September 2012, the following additional parishes began the Parish Area Pastoral Planning process:

Philadelphia: All Saints (Bridesburg), Holy Innocents (Juniata Park/Feltonville), Holy Name of Jesus (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), Mater Dolorosa (Frankford) Our Lady of Consolation (Tacony/Wissanoming), Saint Agnes-Saint John Nepomucene (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), Saint Augustine (Center City East), Saint Bartholomew (Frankford), Saint Bernard (Mayfair), Saint Hugh of Cluny (Fairhill), Saint Joachim (Frankford), Saint Joan of Arc (Richmond), Saint John Cantius (Bridesburg), Saint Laurentius (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), Saint Leo (Tacony/Wissanoming), Saint Michael (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), Old Saint Joseph's (Center City East), Old Saint Mary's (Center City East), Saint Matthew (Mayfair), Saint Peter the Apostle (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), Saint Timothy (Mayfair), and Saint Veronica (Hunting Park). Final decisions regarding parish mergers in these areas are expected by the spring of 2013.

Delaware County: Blessed Virgin Mary (Darby), Holy Savior (Linwood), Immaculate Conception (Marcus Hook), Our Lady of Charity (Brookhaven), Saint Alice (Upper Darby), Saint Cyril of Alexandria (East Lansdowne), Saint Francis de Sales (Lenni), Saint John Fisher (Boothwyn), Saint Joseph (Aston), Saint Katharine Drexel (Chester), Saint Laurence (Upper Darby), Saint Louis (Yeadon), and Saint Philomena (Lansdowne). Final decisions regarding parish mergers in this area are expected by the spring of 2013.

Last April, Archbishop Chaput directed that the merger plans for the following parishes receive more input, broader consultation and further study:

Philadelphia: Holy Cross Parish (East Mount Airy), Saint Benedict Parish (Ogontz/Belfield), Saint Madeleine Sophie Parish (West Mount Airy), and Saint Therese of the Child Jesus (West Mount Airy) Parishes will be studied further. That process began in September 2012. Final decisions are expected by the spring of 2013.

Background on Philadelphia Parish Announcements Effective January 27, 2013


**A parish is always more than statistics as they do not represent the whole of parish life. They were only one part of the larger picture when developing recommendations for parish mergers. They do, however, provide a snapshot of a parish's sacramental activity and a gauge to project stability, growth or decline.**

Saint Callistus and Our Lady of Lourdes Parishes (Philadelphia)
Saint Callistus Parish and Our Lady of Lourdes Parish will merge at the location of and keep the name of Our Lady of Lourdes Parish. The two parishes are located just over one mile away from each other. The Saint Callistus church will remain as a worship site for the time being. The pastor of the newly formed parish will be appointed with the regular priest personnel announcements in the coming weeks.
Saint Callistus Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 4 2
Marriages 0 0
Weekend Mass attendance 209 128

Our Lady of Lourdes Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 18 18
Marriages 9 5
Weekend Mass attendance 675 819


Our Mother of Sorrows and Saint Ignatius of Loyola Parishes (Philadelphia)
Our Mother of Sorrows Parish and Saint Ignatius of Loyola Parish will merge at the location of and keep the name of Saint Ignatius of Loyola Parish. The two parishes are 0.8 miles away from each other. They have been twinned parishes for the past several years sharing the same pastor. The Our Mother of Sorrows Church will remain as a worship site for the time being. The pastor of the newly formed parish will be appointed with the regular priest personnel announcements in the coming weeks.
Our Mother of Sorrows Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 1 1
Marriages 1 0
Weekend Mass attendance 116 99

Saint Ignatius of Loyola Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 5 1
Marriages 1 0
Weekend Mass attendance 153 140


Our Lady of the Blessed Sacrament and Saint Cyprian Parishes (Philadelphia)
Our Mother of the Blessed Sacrament Parish and Saint Cyprian Parish will merge at the location of and keep the name of Saint Cyprian Parish. The two parishes are one mile away from each other. The Our Lady of the Blessed Sacrament church will remain as a worship site for the time being. The pastor of the newly formed parish will be appointed with the regular priest personnel announcements in the coming weeks.
Our Lady of the Blessed Sacrament Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 6 8
Marriages 2 2
Weekend Mass attendance 289 296

Saint Cyprian Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 13 4
Marriages 4 3
Weekend Mass attendance 415 441


Editor's Note:The Archdiocese of Philadelphia is comprised of 44 Pastoral Planning Areas (PPAs). It is expected that the remainder of the first 22 PPAs will complete the work of planning and implementation over the next 18 months. An additional two years will be required for the remainder of the PPAs. For more information on the Parish Area Pastoral Planning, please visit www.archphila.org.

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Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Catholic Social Services Announces Restructuring Plan

January 4, 2013

CATHOLIC SOCIAL SERVICES ANNOUNCES RESTRUCTURING PLAN
Plan will allow the Community-Based Services division of Catholic Social Services to continue to meet the needs of the community while optimizing the use of its limited resources


Today, Catholic Social Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia (CSS) initiated a restructuring plan that is aimed at more effectively utilizing its limited resources to support those in need across the five-county Philadelphia region. As part of the restructuring plan, the Community-Based Services division of Catholic Social Services will merge operations, management and, in some instances, facilities, at selected sites.

Through a thoughtful and prayerful process undertaken by the Catholic Social Services Board, a plan was developed to configure a more well-defined model for community-based services, deployed at fewer sites while maintaining a meaningful and effective presence in each of the five counties. This reorganization makes the best use of limited resources by achieving greater efficiencies and sharpening the focus of social service delivery to those people most in need of assistance. In addition, the new model features a strong emphasis on developing partnerships with successful parish outreach programs throughout the region, a viable alternative approach that leverages CSS support of grassroots local efforts. This method of service delivery will ensure strengthen and better position CSS to deal with future challenges. It will also enhance prospects for long-term program growth and development elsewhere.

Under the restructuring plan, the West Grove Family Service Center will close and a partnership will be formed with Misión Santa Maria Madre de Dios, an outreach program at St. Rocco Parish in Avondale, Chester County. Also as part of the restructuring plan, the Springfield, Delaware County center will close and merge with the Chester City Family Service Center, providing for more staff in the most disadvantaged area of the county. In addition to strengthening operations in a consolidated office in Chester City, a new partnership will be developed with the St. Katharine Drexel Evangelization Center to enhance and expand the existing food and clothing distribution efforts, as well as extend the literacy program to reach more local residents.

With the merging of the Family Service Centers and additional staff reductions throughout CSS, which currently has 317 full time equivalent employees, 13 employees will be affected. All affected employees will be paid for accrued and unused vacation time. In addition to severance, Catholic Social Services will also provide medical coverage for three months and employees will be eligible for a COBRA-like benefit for the six months following.

"Although these changes will be difficult, especially for those who are directly affected by the staff reductions and mergers, this plan will allow CSS to continue to provide services to those who need it most throughout the Archdiocese," said Auxiliary Bishop John McIntyre, who oversees Catholic Social Services. "Amid these changes, what remains constant is our unwavering commitment to continue the works of the Lord Jesus, by affirming, assisting and advocating for individuals, families and communities in need."
CSS offices in Bucks and Montgomery Counties will continue to serve their communities with large food cupboard programs organized by volunteers working in close collaboration with CSS staff. Information and referral assistance in the counties will now be provided through a central "CSS Helpline" (267-331-2490) which has been in use in Philadelphia over the past year. Philadelphia will continue to be served by CSS offices in the Northeast, North, and Southwest sections of the city, with social services supporting healthy family development, homelessness prevention and emergency food assistance.

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Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Host 30th Annual Archdiocesan Inter-faith Prayer Service In Honor Of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

January 11, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO HOST 30TH ANNUAL ARCHDIOCESAN INTER-FAITH PRAYER SERVICE
IN HONOR OF REV. DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR.


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap will lead the 30th Annual Inter-Faith Payer Service in remembrance of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Sunday, January 20, 2013
3:00 p.m.
Saint Therese of the Child Jesus Catholic Church
Upsal and Ardleigh Street
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19119


This year's theme is "Pressing on Toward the Dream: We Move with Faith". The payer service will begin with a procession of religious leaders. Invited speakers from several denominations will proclaim a Scriptural passage and offer a short reflection.

The prayer service is sponsored by the Secretariat for Evangelization and the Office for Black Catholics of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. All are welcome to attend.


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Editor's Note: For more information please contact William Bradley, Director of the Office for Black Catholics at (215) 587-3541.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communication Specialists
215-587-3747

>Archdiocese Announces Parish Mergers In North Philadelphia Resulting From Pastoral Planning Initiative

January 14, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE ANNOUNCES PARISH MERGERS IN
NORTH PHILADELPHIA RESULTING FROM
PASTORAL PLANNING INITIATIVE


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced today that Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has approved the recommendations of the Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee to merge parishes in North Philadelphia.

These mergers are the result of ongoing restructuring that will ultimately strengthen parish communities throughout the Archdiocese positioning them for future growth and sustainability. It is hoped that the result will be revitalized parishes throughout the Archdiocese that are better equipped to meet the spiritual and pastoral needs of future generations.

The recommendations and resulting mergers are an outcome of the Archdiocesan-wide Parish Pastoral Planning Area initiative, which began in 2011. Parishioners at all affected parishes learned of the final decisions through letters mailed to all registered parishioners as well as announcements made at all Masses this weekend.

The mergers announced today were based on a combination of factors, including, but not limited to, demographic shifts in Catholic populations, concentrated density of parishes in a limited geographic area, history of declining Mass attendance and sacramental activity, increasing economic challenges that threaten sustainability, a decrease in the availability of clergy to staff parishes, and a review of facilities.

In each instance, parishioners will attend daily and Sunday Mass at the church of the newly formed parish. The churches of the former parishes will remain open and be maintained as worship sites. At the discretion of the pastor, these sites will be utilized for weddings, funerals and feast days, as well as traditional and ethnic devotions for the duration of at least one year during the transition. Sunday Mass may also be celebrated at a worship site at the discretion of the pastor and the newly formed pastoral council.

All parish property, assets and debts of the former parishes will be assumed by the newly created parishes, which will also be responsible for the care of all sacramental records. The pastors from the merging parishes will form a transitional team made up of lay leaders from each of the merging parishes to assist in moving forward with building the new parish community.

The Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee, made up of lay persons, priests and Archdiocesan personnel, is examining all parishes within the Archdiocese to gauge their viability and assess whether they possess the resources to accomplish their role in the mission of the Church and remain sustainable and vibrant faith communities. Parishes within each pastoral planning area will continue to carefully and thoughtfully examine their viability in order to make future recommendations. Additional parish announcements are expected this spring and in the spring of 2014.

Parish Area Pastoral Planning is designed to be as collaborative and consultative as possible. Its goal is to provide pastors, after consulting their parish leadership, with the opportunity to dialogue with members of the Strategic Planning Committee in providing joint recommendations to the Archbishop for growth and sustainability within their respective geographic areas. Additionally, in the majority of cases, the regional bishop and the dean meet with the pastors as well as their pastoral and finance councils to hear their concerns and receive their recommendations.

The Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee shared all final proposals with the Council of Priests and the College of Consultors for their review before final approval by the Archbishop.

Parish Announcements Effective January 27, 2013:

North Philadelphia:
Saint Hugh of Cluny Parish (Fairhill) and Saint Veronica Parish (Hunting Park) will merge at the location of and keep the name of Saint Veronica Parish. The Saint Hugh of Cluny church will remain as a worship site for the time being.

When this merger becomes effective there will be 252 parishes in the five-county Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

Recently, Archbishop Chaput directed that the merger plans for the parishes listed below receive more input, broader consultation and further study.

North Philadelphia: Holy Innocents (Juniata Park/Feltonville), Mater Dolorosa (Frankford), Saint Joachim (Frankford), and Saint Joan of Arc (Richmond) parishes will be studied further beginning later this month. Final decisions are expected by the spring of 2013.

West Philadelphia: Saint Barbara (Wynnefield), Saint Donato (Overbrook/Morris Park), and Saint Rose of Lima (Haddington/Carroll Park) parishes will be studied further beginning later this month. Final decisions are expected by the spring of 2013.

Previous Announcements:


Last week, the Archdiocese announced parish mergers resulting from the Parish Area Pastoral Planning Initiative in West Philadelphia. Additional information regarding those mergers can be found at http://archphila.org/press releases/pr002099.php.

Last year, the Archdiocese announced initial rounds of parish mergers resulting from the Parish Area Pastoral Planning Initiative in Coatesville and Phoenixville in Chester County as well as the Germanton, Harrowgate, and Manayunk sections of Philadelphia. Additional information regarding those mergers can be found at http://archphila.org/conversion/conversion_index.php.

Future Announcements:


In September 2012, the following additional parishes began the Parish Area Pastoral Planning process:

Philadelphia: All Saints (Bridesburg), Holy Name of Jesus (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), Our Lady of Consolation (Tacony/Wissanoming), Saint Agnes-Saint John Nepomucene (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), Saint Augustine (Center City East), Saint Bartholomew (Frankford), Saint Bernard (Mayfair), Saint John Cantius (Bridesburg), Saint Laurentius (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), Saint Leo (Tacony/Wissanoming), Saint Michael (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), Old Saint Joseph's (Center City East), Old Saint Mary's (Center City East), Saint Matthew (Mayfair), Saint Peter the Apostle (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), and Saint Timothy (Mayfair). Final decisions regarding parish mergers in these areas are expected by the spring of 2013.

Delaware County: Blessed Virgin Mary (Darby), Holy Savior (Linwood), Immaculate Conception (Marcus Hook), Our Lady of Charity (Brookhaven), Saint Alice (Upper Darby), Saint Cyril of Alexandria (East Lansdowne), Saint Francis de Sales (Lenni), Saint John Fisher (Boothwyn), Saint Joseph (Aston), Saint Katharine Drexel (Chester), Saint Laurence (Upper Darby), Saint Louis (Yeadon), and Saint Philomena (Lansdowne). Final decisions regarding parish mergers in this area are expected by the spring of 2013.

Last April, Archbishop Chaput directed that the merger plans for the following parishes receive more input, broader consultation and further study:

Philadelphia: Holy Cross Parish (East Mount Airy), Saint Benedict Parish (Ogontz/Belfield), Saint Madeleine Sophie Parish (West Mount Airy), and Saint Therese of the Child Jesus (West Mount Airy) Parishes will be studied further. That process began in September 2012. Final decisions are expected by the spring of 2013.

Background on Philadelphia Parish Announcements Effective January 27, 2013


**A parish is always more than statistics as they do not represent the whole of parish life. They were only one part of the larger picture when developing recommendations for parish mergers. They do, however, provide a snapshot of a parish's sacramental activity and a gauge to project stability, growth or decline.**

Saint Hugh of Cluny and Saint Veronica Parishes (Philadelphia)
Saint Hugh of Cluny Parish and Saint Veronica Parish will merge at the location of and keep the name of Saint Veronica Parish. The two parishes are located 0.5 miles away from each other. Together they will have a combined parish registration of 2,000 households and 6,000 people. The merger presents an opportunity to strengthen existing outreach and evangelization programs to the Hispanic Catholic community in the area.  

The Saint Hugh of Cluny church will remain as a worship site. The pastor of the newly formed parish will be appointed with the regular priest personnel announcements in the coming weeks.

Saint Hugh of Cluny Parish 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 21 15
Marriages 4 2
Weekend Mass attendance 520 532

Saint Veronica Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 18 10
Marriages 9 5
Weekend Mass attendance 742 691



Editor’s Note: The Archdiocese of Philadelphia is comprised of 44 Pastoral Planning Areas (PPAs). It is expected that the remainder of the first 22 PPAs will complete the work of planning and implementation over the next 18 months. An additional two years will be required for the remainder of the PPAs. For more information on the Parish Area Pastoral Planning, please visit www.archphila.org.

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Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Restoring The Heart Of Catholic Life

January 17, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
RESTORING THE HEART OF CATHOLIC LIFE


I think it proves God's sense of timing that whenever the world most bitterly criticizes the Church, good men step forward to rekindle her witness. The past decade has been difficult for Catholics from every walk of life, including priests. But it's not the first time in Church history, nor will it be the last, that God has used failure and suffering to restore the heart of Catholic life. That renewal hinges in a special way on our priests.
Here in Philadelphia we're blessed with one of the great seminaries of the United States: St. Charles Borromeo Seminary. The men who study there for the priesthood, and those who teach them, deserve our gratitude for their dedication, joy and unselfishness. They also need our support and prayers for the work of revivifying Catholic life that lies ahead. So it's a good moment to take stock of our identity as a community of faith.
The Church is not just a collection of individuals gathered around a sacred text. She's a community - a community rooted both in God's Word and in sacrament.
No matter how many other things bear good fruit for the Gospel in our day, there is no ongoing presence of Jesus Christ in the world without the Church; there is no Church without the Eucharist; and there is no Eucharist without the priest.
As a result, in every generation, we always need good priests: well-formed men of hope and courage; men who love Jesus Christ, love the Church and are eager to serve God's people. And - equally important - we need a community of believers that will encourage these men, and support them as a family in their sacrifices.
The patron saint of parish priests is the great French "Cure of Ars," John Vianney, who had a tremendous esteem for the priesthood. Whenever others offered him compliments or praised his holiness, he always deflected the praise away from his own person and toward the office of the priest.
He once said that "If we really understood the priest on earth, we would die not of fright but of love. … The priesthood is the love of the heart of Jesus."
As with married life, priesthood is a serious choice in response to God's call. It has life-changing consequences. But - again like married life - it's not merely life-changing, but life-giving. When genuinely given over to Christ, priesthood is a life of joy, courage, freedom and fraternity; a life of fruitfulness and meaning.
And these things far outweigh its challenges.
This week, January 13-19, is the 2013 National Vocations Awareness Week. But in reality, every week should begin and end with our prayers for more good vocations, especially to the priesthood. In the year ahead, I ask the priests of Philadelphia, who already serve the Lord and his Church so well, to encourage the young men of their parishes to consider a priestly vocation, and to communicate the happiness they have experienced in their own priestly ministry.
I also ask the Catholic people of southeast Pennsylvania to pray daily for vocations to the priesthood. God most easily answers our prayers when we actively seek to cooperate with his will. So I also urge parents to cultivate a love for the Church and her sacraments in their children.
I especially urge them to model their own love for the priesthood by supporting our priests in daily parish life, and by creating an environment in their homes where vocations to the priesthood are encouraged, discussed, and received by children as a great and holy personal choice.
Every Christian life is lived in communion and on mission. The Church is an ecology of love. She is most fruitful when her members love well.
As young men consider the future course of their lives this week, and the adventure of service and love that lies at the heart of the priesthood in the year ahead, let's all of us remember in a special way to keep them in our daily prayers, and to sustain them by the witness of our own Christian discipleship.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Perform Honorary Ringing Of The Liberty Bell On Martin Luther King Day

January 18, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO PERFORM HONORARY RINGING OF THE LIBERTY BELL ON MARTIN LUTHER KING DAY


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap will be the honorary ringer of the Liberty Bell at the 28th Annual National Bell Ringing Ceremony marking Martin Luther King Day. The Archbishop will also lead all those gathered in prayer at the opening of the ceremony and offer brief remarks.

Monday, January 21, 2013
11:15 a.m.
12:00 p.m. (Symbolic Ringing of the Liberty Bell)
Liberty Bell Center
6th Street and Market Ave.
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19106


The Philadelphia Martin Luther King, Jr. Association for Nonviolence holds this event each year to preserve the memory and vision of Dr. King as well as to promote freedom and justice for all people. It traditionally marks the beginning of Martin Luther King Day celebrations in the city.

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Editor's Note: For more information on the National Bell Ring Ringing Ceremony visit http://www.philadelphiamlk.org


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

January 23, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO LEAD FAITHFUL TO
40TH ANNUAL MARCH FOR LIFE

Promoting the respect and protection of all human life and the end of legalized abortion


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will lead thousands of faithful from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia on the Annual March for Life in Washington, D.C. on Friday, January 25, 2013. This year marks the 40th anniversary of the 1973 Supreme Court decision Roe vs. Wade, which legalized abortion in the United States.

The March for Life activities will begin with an Opening Mass at the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception. The principal celebrant and homilist will be Cardinal Seán Patrick O'Malley, O.F.M. Cap., Archbishop of Boston and Chairman-elect of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops Pro-Life Committee.

Thursday, January 24, 2013
6:30 p.m.
Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception
400 Michigan Avenue, NE
Washington, D.C., 20017


Archbishop Chaput will be the main celebrant and homilist at a Mass on the morning of the March for Life for participants from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

Friday, January 25, 2013
10:00 a.m.
Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception
400 Michigan Avenue, NE
Washington, D.C., 20017


The March for Life Rally will begin at the National Mall at 12:00 p.m. Participants from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will meet on the corner of Constitution Avenue and 6th Street (in front of the National Gallery of Art). They will process behind the Archdiocese of Philadelphia banner, carried by seminarians from Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary. The March for Life is scheduled to begin at 1:30 p.m.

For Media Coverage of Bus Departures:

A bus sponsored by the Office for Cultural Ministries will depart from Saint Raymond Parish for Washington, D.C. on Friday, January 25, 2013 at 4:00 a.m. from 1350 Vernon Rd. in Philadelphia.

Three buses from Archbishop Ryan High School in Philadelphia will depart at 6:15 a.m. from the school's main entrance - 11201 Academy Road, Philadelphia, 19154.

Two buses from Bishop McDevitt High School will depart for Washington, D.C. on Friday, January 25, 2013 at 6:15 a.m. from the school parking lot at 125 Royal Ave. in Wyncote, PA.

Buses transporting more than 100 seminarians will depart Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary in Wynnewood at 5:45 a.m.


# # #


Editor's Note: For more information please visit the Office for Family, Life and the Laity at http://archphila.org/evangelization/resplife/resplife.htm


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Schools Throughout The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Celebrate Catholic Schools Week Catholic Schools Week 2013 Theme: Catholic Schools Raise The Standards

January 24, 2013

SCHOOLS THROUGHOUT THE ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA CELEBRATE CATHOLIC SCHOOLS WEEK
Catholic Schools Week 2013 Theme: Catholic Schools Raise the Standards


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia will join in the national observance of Catholic Schools Week January 27, 2013 - February 2, 2013. Catholic Schools Week is an annual celebration of the values-centered, faith-filled education that students receive in Catholic elementary, secondary and special education schools. The theme for Catholic Schools Week 2013 is "Catholic Schools Raise the Standards."

Catholic Schools Week Kick-Off Event:

Bishop Daniel E. Thomas will lead a prayer service and accept
a Catholic Schools Week decree from
Mayor Michael A. Nutter

9:00 a.m.
Monday, January 28, 2013
Immaculate Heart of Mary Church
819 East Cathedral Road
Philadelphia, PA 19128


Additional Catholic Schools Week Events:

Sunday, January 27, 2013

Saint Aloysius Parish School: 220 North Hanover Street, Pottstown, PA 19464 (Montgomery County)
2:00 p.m.
A special Mass will begin the school's 100th anniversary celebration. Former teachers, staff, borough officials and members of the chamber of commerce have been invited to attend.

Monday, January 28, 2013

Immaculate Heart of Mary School: 819 Cathedral Road, Philadelphia, PA 19128
9:00 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.
Bishop Daniel E. Thomas will lead a prayer service kicking-off Catholic Schools Week in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Mayor Michael A. Nutter will be present and will present the Bishop with a Catholic Schools Week proclamation.

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Saint Bernadette of Lourdes Parish School: 1015 Turner Avenue, Drexel Hill, PA 19026 (Delaware County)
8:30 a.m.
The Saint Bernadette school community will participate in a school liturgy recognizing those community members serving in the military.

Saint Katherine of Siena School: 9738 Frankford Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19114
8:20 a.m.- 2:30 p.m. Parents are invited to come to school with their children to explain their careers and relate it to their Catholic faith.

Visitation B.V.M. Parish School: 190 North Trooper Road, Norristown, PA 19403 (Montgomery County)
1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
As part of the school's "Extend Kindness Day" students and teachers will prepare pages with acts of kindness in memory and in honor of victims of the recent tragedy in Sandy Hook, Connecticut. Once the booklet is completed it will be mailed to the new school in Monroe, Connecticut.

Nativity of Our Lord Parish School: 585 West Street Road, Warminster, PA 18974 (Bucks County)
1:30 p.m. -2:30 p.m.
Students will write an essay or create artwork that expresses how their Catholic education prepares them for life and makes them better citizens

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Saint Michael the Archangel: 130 Levittown Parkway, Levittown, PA 19054 (Bucks County)
8:45 a.m. -2:30 p.m.
Throughout the day students will pair up and create fabric tied blankets to be donated to Saint Mary's Hospital.

Mother of Divine Grace School: 2612 East Monmouth Street, Philadelphia PA 19134
12:00 p.m.
The school will host a "thank you" luncheon for local police officers and firefighters.

Resurrection Regional Catholic School: 2020 Shelmire Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19152
1:00 p.m.
Students will be participating in a "Dime Trail Race" with all proceeds donated to victims of Hurricane Sandy.

Holy Rosary Regional Catholic School: 3040 Walton Road, Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462 (Montgomery County)
1:00 - 2:30 p.m.
During the school's Vocations/Career Day, students in grades 4-8 will be given presentations on different vocations or careers by priests, men and women serving in the armed forces, firefighters, etc.


Thursday, January 31, 2013

Bishop McDevitt High School: 125 Royal Avenue, Wyncote, PA 19095 (Montgomery County)
9:00 a.m.
The school will host its 8th annual Papal Colloquium. Bishop Daniel Thomas will celebrate the opening liturgy. Following the liturgy, keynote speaker Sister Therese Auer, O.P., a member of the Dominican Sisters of Saint Cecilia Congregation, will address those in attendance on the "Critical Importance of Bioethics For the Young Catholic."

Saint Genevieve Parish School: 1237 Bethlehem Pike, Flourtown, PA 19031 (Montgomery County)
9:30 a.m.
The Archdiocese of Philadelphia Office of Catholic Education will recognize Monsignor Michael Matz, as Distinguished Pastor of the Year. Monsignor will be presented with a proclamation from Ms. Jacqueline Coccia, Superintendent of Elementary Schools and is currently pastor at Saint Genevieve Parish.

Saint Katharine of Siena Parish: 229 Windermere Avenue, Wayne, PA 19087 (Delaware County)
1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
The entire school community will be preset for an assembly with motivational speak and rapper, Sterlen Barr.


Friday, February 1, 2013

Saint Mary Interparochial School, Fifth and Locust Streets, Philadelphia, PA 19106
1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Alumni are invited to talk to students in grades 7 and 8 about their professional experiences.

Saint Isidore Parish School: 603 West Broad Street, Quakertown, PA 18951 (Bucks County)
1:00 p.m.
Current and former members of the Philadelphia Flyers will be present for a school wide assembly.

# # #






Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Catholic Schools And The Christian Mission

January 28, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
CATHOLIC SCHOOLS AND THE CHRISTIAN MISSION


God renews the world with our actions, not our intentions. What separates real discipleship from surface piety is whether we actually do what we say we believe.

Our vocation as Christians is not simply to pass along good morals to our children, or convey a sense of God's hand in the world. These things are vital, of course, but they don't exhaust our purpose for being here. Our mission is to bring the world to Jesus Christ, and Jesus Christ to the world. Each of us is a missionary, and our primary task is the conversion of our own hearts and the hearts of others so that someday the whole world will acknowledge Jesus Christ as humanity's only savior and Lord.

That's a big job. We can't do it by just talking about it, any more than Christ could redeem us by writing an essay on sin. The Gospels have power because they tell the story of what God did; what his only Son did; and what Christ's followers did. The Passion accounts of Christ's suffering and death move us so deeply because they show in bitter detail how unashamedly God loves us.

This is the hot spark at the heart of every sincere attempt to tell the story of our redemption. God spared not even his own Son in saving us. No wonder the cross draws the eye of great artists again and again down through the centuries. The blood of the cross reminds us that - on at least one day in history - love had no limits. And since then, everything has been different.

How does this relate to Catholic schools? We tend to forget that for much of its history, the United States has not welcomed Catholics or their faith. Anti-Catholic prejudice and violence were common. Catholic schools in the 19th and early 20th centuries had the task of ensuring the survival of the Church by protecting Catholic children from the heavily Protestant formation found in American public education. Times have changed, and today believing Christians, whatever their background, usually try to seek common ground rather than reasons to disagree. This is a great blessing. But the "countercultural" work of Catholic schools - forming young lives in virtue, truth and a vivid Catholic identity - remains crucial. In a national environment that often seems morally confused, and increasingly indifferent to religion in general and Christianity in particular, Catholic schools offer a path not just to knowledge but to moral wholeness.

By anchoring themselves in the love of God, Catholic schools, at their best, create in the student a hunger for achievement and academic excellence. They form young people in the kind of moral purpose that leads to leadership and social responsibility in adult life. The results don't lie. It's no accident that a vast number of business and civic leaders in the Philadelphia region were educated, at least in part, by Catholic schools. In their effect, our schools are a treasure not just for the Catholic Church, but for the whole public community. That's why our archdiocesan schools are worth fighting to keep alive and to grow, despite all the financial pressures we now face. And that's why Catholics need to be politically engaged on matters like school choice and financially generous in their support of Catholic education.

This year, January 27 through February 2 is Catholic Schools Week. Here in Philadelphia, a lot has happened in the last 12 months: the release of a Blue Ribbon Commission report on Catholic education; parish school reprieves and consolidations; a new chance at life for four high schools scheduled to close; a new Faith in the Future Foundation to underwrite the strategic health of our Catholic schools; and new initiatives to sustain "mission schools" in poor areas. As we rightly honor our school teachers, administrators and wonderful donors, we need to remember two things: First, the excellence of our schools makes them worth all of our sacrifices; and second, the purpose of our schools is much more than mere professional success.

God built the Church we've inherited through the love of generations of believers. Their witness made our faith possible. It's now our turn to shape the future by the zeal we bring to our own daily witness. It's our turn to act. It's our turn to live our Catholic faith with all the courage and strength Christ brought to loving the Church he founded.

Catholic schools play an irreplaceable role in making that kind of vigorous Christian witness a reality. More than any other reason, that's why they're important.

The Church depends on God who will always renew and protect her. But she also depends on you and me - teachers, pastors, parents and so many others - to carry Christ's mission into the world. Words are cheap. Actions matter. It's time to live our Catholic faith as the apostles did - and through it, to reshape the world.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia To Kick Off Catholic Relief Services' Rice Bowl The Local Church Supports A Nationwide Effort To Alleviate Poverty And Hunger Through Prayer, Fasting, And Alms Giving

January 28, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA TO KICK OFF CATHOLIC RELIEF SERVICES' RICE BOWL
The local Church supports a nationwide effort to alleviate poverty and hunger through
prayer, fasting, and alms giving


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia marks the beginning of its 38th consecutive year participating in Catholic Relief Services' Rice Bowl, a nationwide effort to fight poverty and hunger. Administered by Catholic Relief Services (CRS), Rice Bowl encourages participants to live in solidarity with the poor through prayer, fasting and alms giving. Bishop John J. McIntyre will preside at this year's Rice Bowl kick-off event, at which he will bless the rice bowls.

Tuesday, January 29, 2013
1:30 p.m.
Saint Vincent de Paul Society Food Cupboard
Blessed Virgin Mary Parish
47 MacDade Boulevard, Darby, PA 19023


At the event, Bishop McIntyre will encourage families to place money that they would have spent on meals into the rice bowls to remember those who are poor and hungry, concluding with prayer for a successful campaign throughout the Archdiocese.

Also during the event, Maureen McCullough, CRS Regional Director, will explain the components of CRS' Rice Bowl. Blessed Virgin Mary School students will share stories about people worldwide touched by the program, and cupboard coordinators, Dottie and Dan Gallagher and Saint Vincent de Paul Society members will share how CRS's Rice Bowl supports local people in need.

Parishioners in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia donated almost $382,000 to CRS's Rice Bowl during Lent 2012. Of that amount, about $94,000 stayed in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and helped the Office for Nutritional Development Services fight hunger in the region. The remainder was distributed to Catholic Relief Services to combat hunger and other basic human needs overseas.

Catholic Relief Services is the official international humanitarian agency of the Catholic community in the United States.

###


Editor's Note: For more information on CRS's Rice Bowl please contact Anne H. Ayella, CRS Archdiocesan Director at 267-262-8901. For more information on Catholic Relief Services please visit http://orb.crs.org


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Announces Additional Parish Merger In West Philadelphia Resulting From Pastoral Planning Initiative

February 3, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE ANNOUNCES ADDITIONAL PARISH MERGER IN
WEST PHILADELPHIA RESULTING FROM
PASTORAL PLANNING INITIATIVE


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced today that Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has approved the recommendation of the Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee to merge an additional parish in West Philadelphia.

These mergers are the result of ongoing restructuring that will ultimately strengthen parish communities throughout the Archdiocese positioning them for future growth and sustainability. It is hoped that the result will be revitalized parishes throughout the Archdiocese that are better equipped to meet the spiritual and pastoral needs of future generations.

The recommendations and resulting mergers are an outcome of the Archdiocesan-wide Parish Pastoral Planning Area initiative, which began in 2011. Parishioners at all affected parishes learned of the final decisions through letters mailed to all registered parishioners as well as announcements made at all Masses this weekend.

The mergers announced today were based on a combination of factors, including, but not limited to, demographic shifts in Catholic populations, concentrated density of parishes in a limited geographic area, history of declining Mass attendance and sacramental activity, increasing economic challenges that threaten sustainability, a decrease in the availability of clergy to staff parishes, and a review of facilities.

In each instance, parishioners will attend daily and Sunday Mass at the church of the newly formed parish. The churches of the former parishes will remain open and be maintained as worship sites. At the discretion of the pastor, these sites will be utilized for weddings, funerals and feast days, as well as traditional and ethnic devotions for the duration of at least one year during the transition. Sunday Mass may also be celebrated at a worship site at the discretion of the pastor and the newly formed pastoral council.

All parish property, assets and debts of the former parishes will be assumed by the newly created parishes, which will also be responsible for the care of all sacramental records. The pastors from the merging parishes will form a transitional team made up of lay leaders from each of the merging parishes to assist in moving forward with building the new parish community.

The Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee, made up of lay persons, priests and Archdiocesan personnel, is examining all parishes within the Archdiocese to gauge their viability and assess whether they possess the resources to accomplish their role in the mission of the Church and remain sustainable and vibrant faith communities. Parishes within each pastoral planning area will continue to carefully and thoughtfully examine their viability in order to make future recommendations. Additional parish announcements are expected this spring and in the spring of 2014.

Parish Area Pastoral Planning is designed to be as collaborative and consultative as possible. Its goal is to provide pastors, after consulting their parish leadership, with the opportunity to dialogue with members of the Strategic Planning Committee in providing joint recommendations to the Archbishop for growth and sustainability within their respective geographic areas. Additionally, in the majority of cases, the regional bishop and the dean meet with the pastors as well as their pastoral and finance councils to hear their concerns and receive their recommendations.

The Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee shared all final proposals with the Council of Priests and the College of Consultors for their review before final approval by the Archbishop.

Parish Announcement Effective February 24, 2013:

West Philadelphia:
Saint Donato (Overbrook/Morris Park) and Our Lady of Lourdes Parish (Overbrook/Morris Park) will merge at the location of and keep the name of Our Lady of Lourdes Parish. Previously, Saint Callistus Parish (Overbrook/Morris Park) formally merged with Our Lady of Lourdes Parish effective January 27, 2013.

The Saint Donato church will remain as a worship site for the time being.

When this merger becomes effective there will be 251 parishes in the five-county Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

Recently, Archbishop Chaput directed that the merger plans for the parishes listed below receive more input, broader consultation and further study.

North Philadelphia: Holy Innocents (Juniata Park/Feltonville), Mater Dolorosa (Frankford), Saint Joachim (Frankford), and Saint Joan of Arc (Richmond) parishes will be studied further beginning later this month. Final decisions are expected by the spring of 2013.

West Philadelphia: Saint Barbara (Wynnefield) and Saint Rose of Lima (Haddington/Carroll Park) parishes will be studied further beginning later this month. Final decisions are expected by the spring of 2013.

Previous Announcements:


Last month, the Archdiocese announced parish mergers resulting from the Parish Area Pastoral Planning Initiative in North Philadelphia and West Philadelphia. Additional information regarding those mergers can be found at http://archphila.org/conversion/conversion_index.php.

Last year, the Archdiocese announced initial rounds of parish mergers resulting from the Parish Area Pastoral Planning Initiative in Coatesville and Phoenixville in Chester County as well as the Germanton, Harrowgate, and Manayunk sections of Philadelphia. Additional information regarding those mergers can be found at http://archphila.org/conversion/conversion_index.php.

Future Announcements:


In September 2012, the following additional parishes began the Parish Area Pastoral Planning process:

Philadelphia: All Saints (Bridesburg), Holy Name of Jesus (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), Our Lady of Consolation (Tacony/Wissanoming), Saint Agnes-Saint John Nepomucene (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), Saint Augustine (Center City East), Saint Bartholomew (Frankford), Saint Bernard (Mayfair), Saint John Cantius (Bridesburg), Saint Laurentius (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), Saint Leo (Tacony/Wissanoming), Saint Michael (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), Old Saint Joseph's (Center City East), Old Saint Mary's (Center City East), Saint Matthew (Mayfair), Saint Peter the Apostle (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), and Saint Timothy (Mayfair). Final decisions regarding parish mergers in these areas are expected by the spring of 2013.

Delaware County: Blessed Virgin Mary (Darby), Holy Savior (Linwood), Immaculate Conception (Marcus Hook), Our Lady of Charity (Brookhaven), Saint Alice (Upper Darby), Saint Cyril of Alexandria (East Lansdowne), Saint Francis de Sales (Lenni), Saint John Fisher (Boothwyn), Saint Joseph (Aston), Saint Katharine Drexel (Chester), Saint Laurence (Upper Darby), Saint Louis (Yeadon), and Saint Philomena (Lansdowne). Final decisions regarding parish mergers in this area are expected by the spring of 2013.

Last April, Archbishop Chaput directed that the merger plans for the following parishes receive more input, broader consultation and further study:

Philadelphia: Holy Cross Parish (East Mount Airy), Saint Benedict Parish (Ogontz/Belfield), Saint Madeleine Sophie Parish (West Mount Airy), and Saint Therese of the Child Jesus (West Mount Airy) Parishes will be studied further. That process began in September 2012. Final decisions are expected by the spring of 2013.

Background on Philadelphia Parish Announcements Effective February 24, 2013


**A parish is always more than statistics as they do not represent the whole of parish life. They were only one part of the larger picture when developing recommendations for parish mergers. They do, however, provide a snapshot of a parish's sacramental activity and a gauge to project stability, growth or decline.**

Saint Donato and Our Lady of Lourdes Parishes (Philadelphia)
Saint Donato Parish and Our Lady of Lourdes Parish will merge at the location of and keep the name of Our Lady of Lourdes Parish. The two parishes are located 1.25 miles away from each other. Without such a merger, Saint Donato Parish would not have been self-sustainable in the future.

The Saint Donato church will remain as a worship site. The pastor of the newly formed parish will be appointed with the regular priest personnel announcements in the coming weeks.

Saint Donato Parish:
Year 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 6 7
Marriages 6 6
Weekend Mass attendance 241 169

Our Lady of Lourdes Parish:
Year 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 18 18
Marriages 9 5
Weekend Mass attendance 675 819

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Editor's Note: The Archdiocese of Philadelphia is comprised of 44 Pastoral Planning Areas (PPAs). It is expected that the remainder of the first 22 PPAs will complete the work of planning and implementation over the next 18 months. An additional two years will be required for the remainder of the PPAs. For more information on the Parish Area Pastoral Planning, please visit www.archphila.org.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Making Sense Of Another Ambiguous 'compromise'

February 4, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
MAKING SENSE OF ANOTHER AMBIGUOUS 'COMPROMISE'


To live well is nothing other than to love God with all one's heart, with all one's soul and with all one's efforts; from this it comes about that love is kept whole and uncorrupted (through temperance). No misfortune can disturb it (and this is fortitude). It obeys only [God] (and this is justice), and is careful in discerning things, so as not to be surprised by deceit or trickery (and this is prudence).

- Augustine


The Catechism of the Catholic Church reminds us that prudence is the auriga virtutum, the "charioteer of virtues." It's "right reason in action," the guide to correctly applying all other virtues. Rash action, no matter how well intended, violates prudence and usually does more harm than good. God gave us brains. He expects us to use them to judiciously pursue the highest moral good for others and for ourselves.

At the same time, the Catechism warns that prudence should never be used as an alibi for "timidity or fear, duplicity or dissimulation." Real prudence has a spine called fortitude, the virtue we more commonly know as courage. And courage, in the words of C.S. Lewis, "is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point, which means at the point of highest reality."

Here's why both these virtues are vital in the weeks ahead. On Friday, February 1, the Obama administration issued for public comment a set of revised regulations governing the HHS "contraceptive mandate." At first glance, the new rules have struck some people as a modest improvement. They appear to expand, in a limited way, the kind of religiously-affiliated entities that can claim exemption from providing insurance coverage for contraceptive and abortion-related services under the new Affordable Care Act.

White House apologists and supporters have welcomed the proposal. The New York Times called it "a good compromise." Groups like the American Civil Liberties Union and NARAL Prochoice America have praised it. And at least one Washington Post columnist implausibly called it a victory for America's Catholic bishops.

The trouble is, the new rules are very complex. And they may actually make things worse. In the words of Notre Dame Law Professor Gerard Bradley:

"Gauging the net effect of the new administration proposal [is] hazardous. But one can say with confidence the following: (1) religious hospitals are, as before, not exempt 'religious employers'; (2) religious charities are very likely not exempt either, unless they are run out of a church or are very tightly integrated with a church. So, a parish or even a diocese's Saint Vincent De Paul operations would probably be an exempt 'religious employer,' whereas Catholic Charities would not be; (3) the new proposal may (or may not) make it more likely that parish grade schools are exempt 'religious employers.' But Catholic high schools are a different matter. Some might qualify as 'religious employers.' Most probably will not.

"It is certain that Catholic colleges and universities do not qualify as exempt 'religious employers.' The new proposal includes, however, a revised 'accommodation' for at least some of these institutions, as well as some hospitals and charities. The proposal refines the administration's earlier efforts to somehow insulate the colleges and universities from immoral complicity in contraception, mainly by shifting -- at least nominally - the cost and administration of the immoral services to either the health insurance issuer (think Blue Cross) or to the plan administrator (for self-insured entities, such as Notre Dame). This proposal adds some additional layering to the earlier attempts to insulate the schools, but nothing of decisive moral significance is included."

The White House has made no concessions to the religious conscience claims of private businesses, and the whole spirit of the "compromise" is minimalist.

As a result, the latest White House "compromise" already has a wave of critics, including respected national religious liberty law firms like the Becket Fund and the Alliance Defending Freedom. And many are far harsher than Professor Bradley in their analysis.

The scholar Yuval Levin has stressed that the new HHS mandate proposal, "like the versions that have preceded it, betrays a complete lack of understanding of both religious liberty and religious conscience." In reality, despite the appearance of compromise, "the government has forced a needless and completely avoidable confrontation and has knowingly put many religious believers in an impossible situation."

One of the issues America's bishops now face is how best to respond to an HHS mandate that remains unnecessary, coercive and gravely flawed. In the weeks ahead the bishops of our country, myself included, will need both prudence and courage - the kind of courage that gives prudence spine and results in right action, whatever the cost. Please pray that God guides our discussions.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Ash Wednesday In The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia

February 7, 2013

ASH WEDNESDAY IN THE ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA


Catholics throughout the Philadelphia region mark the beginning of Lent


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will be the principal celebrant for the Ash Wednesday Mass at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul.

Catholics in 252 parishes across the Archdiocese will attend Mass or a Liturgy of the Word and receive ashes on their foreheads which are marked in the sign of a cross to remind them of their mortality and the need for God's grace as Lent 2013 begins with Ash Wednesday.


Wednesday, February 13, 2013
12:05 p.m.
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA



Ash Wednesday signifies the beginning of Lent for Christians throughout the world. Lent is the 40-day penitential season of prayer, fasting and almsgiving from Ash Wednesday through Holy Thursday in preparation for Easter.

Beginning next week, parishes throughout the five-county Archdiocese will offer the Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation each Wednesday evening from 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the duration of the Lenten Season.

The Bishops of the United States prescribe, as a minimal obligation, that all persons who are fourteen years of age and older are bound to abstain from eating meat on Ash Wednesday, all the Fridays of Lent and Good Friday. Further, all persons eighteen years of age and older, up to and including their fifty-ninth birthday, are bound to fast by limiting themselves to a single full meal on Ash Wednesday and on Good Friday, while the other two meals on those days are to be light.

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Editor's Note: For Ash Wednesday Mass in the Cathedral an audio and video mult-box feed will be provided. Crews will need a bnc connector and recording deck or a live truck. Television cameras will not be permitted in the Cathedral. Reporters and still photographers will be permitted in the Cathedral.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Confirmation Schedules - Spring 2013 (as Of February 11, 2013 - Subject To Change)

February 25, 2013

Confirmation Schedules - Spring 2013
(as of March 22, 2013 - subject to change)



CELEBRANT: ARCHBISHOP CHARLES J. CHAPUT, O.F.M. CAP.

Saturday, March 9 at 10 a.m., Saint Katherine of Siena, Philadelphia
Thursday, March 14 at 4 p.m., Our Lady of the Sacred Heart, Hilltown
Sunday, April 7 at 11 a.m., Saint Teresa of Avila, Norristown
Thursday, April 11 at 4 p.m., Presentation B.V.M., Wynnewood
Saturday, April 13 at 10 a.m., Saint Christopher, Philadelphia
Thursday, April 18 at 4 p.m., Saint Charles Borromeo, Bensalem
Sunday, April 21 at 11 a.m., Saint Francis Cabrini, Fairless Hills
Sunday, April 28 at 12 p.m., Saint Laurence (Highland Park), Upper Darby
Monday, April 29 at 4 p.m., Saint Eugene, Primos
Friday, May 24 at 6 p.m., Saint Hugh of Cluny, Philadelphia

CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND DANIEL E. THOMAS
(Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia)

Sunday, February 17 at 11 a.m., All Saints, Philadelphia
Tuesday, February 19 at 4 p.m., Saint Bernadette, Drexel Hill
Sunday, February 24 at 12:15 p.m., Saint Laurentius, Philadelphia
Tuesday, February 26 at 4 p.m., Nativity of Our Lord, Warminster
Saturday, March 2 at 5 p.m., Saint Paul, Philadelphia
Saturday, March 16 at 9:30 a.m., & 1:30 p.m., Saint Katharine of Siena, Wayne
Tuesday, March 19 at 4 p.m., Saint Joseph, Aston
Thursday, March 21 at 4 p.m., Saint Norbert, Paoli
Thursday, April 4 at 4 p.m., Holy Saviour, Linwood
Saturday, April 6 at 10 a.m., & 2 p.m., Saint Elizabeth, Uwchlan
Tuesday, April 9 at 4 p.m., Saint Luke the Evangelist, Glenside
Thursday, April 11 at 7 p.m., Saint Philip Neri, Pennsburg
Saturday, April 13 at 5 p.m., Saint Peter the Apostle, Philadelphia
Sunday, April 14 at 2:30 p.m., Saint Monica, Philadelphia
Monday, April 15 at 5 p.m., Saint John Cantius, Philadelphia
Tuesday, April 16 at 5 p.m., Saint Gabriel of the Sorrowful Mother, Avondale
Thursday, April 18 at 4 p.m., Saint Philip Neri, Lafayette Hill
Tuesday, April 23 at 5 p.m., Saint John Fisher, Boothwyn
Thursday, April 25 at 4 p.m., Saint Matthew, Philadelphia
Saturday, April 27 at 10 a.m., & 2 p.m., Saint Maximilian Kolbe, West Chester
Sunday, April 28 at 11:30 a.m., Saint Leo, Philadelphia
Thursday, May 2 at 5 p.m., Saint Peter, West Brandywine
Saturday, May 4 at 4:30 p.m., Saint Edmond, Philadelphia
Sunday, May 5 at 10:30 a.m., Saint John the Baptist, Ottsville
Saturday, May 11 at 9:30 a.m., & 1:30 p.m., Saint Cornelius, Chadds Ford
Tuesday, May 21 at 6 p.m., Hispanic Community of Delaware County at Saint Alice Church, Upper Darby
Thursday, May 23 at 4 p.m., Queen of the Universe, Levittown

CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND TIMOTHY C. SENIOR
(Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia)


Friday, March 1 at 4 p.m., Mary, Mother of the Redeemer, North Wales
Saturday, March 2 at 10 a.m., Mary, Mother of the Redeemer, North Wales
Thursday, April 4 at 4:30 p.m., Saint Thomas More, Pottstown
Saturday, April 6 at 2 p.m., Saints Simon and Jude, West Chester
Sunday, April 7 at 11 a.m., Saint Bridget, Philadelphia
Thursday, April 11 at 4 p.m., Saint Thomas the Apostle, Glen Mills
Saturday, April 13 at 10 a.m., Saint Pius X, Broomall
Saturday, April 13 at 5 p.m., Our Lady of Ransom, Philadelphia
Sunday, April 14 at 11 a.m., Holy Family, Philadelphia (Manayunk)
Thursday, April 18 at 4 p.m., Saint Helena, Blue Bell
Saturday, April 20 at 10 a.m., Saint Monica, Berwyn
Sunday, April 21 at 10 a.m., Saint Ann, Bristol
Thursday, April 25 at 5 p.m., Saint Isidore, Quakertown
Wednesday, May 1 at 4 p.m., Saint Alphonsus, Maple Glen
Sunday, May 5 at 4 p.m., Epiphany of Our Lord, Philadelphia
Thursday, May 16 at 4 p.m., Saint Timothy, Philadelphia

CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND JOHN J. MCINTYRE
(Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia)


Thursday, February 21 at 5 p.m., Saint Cecilia, Philadelphia
Monday, February 25 at 4 p.m., Saint Mary and Saint Gertrude at Saint Gertrude Church
Thursday, February 28 at 4 p.m., Nativity B.V.M., Media
Saturday, March 2 at 4:30 p.m., Saint Joachim, Philadelphia
Monday, March 4 at 4 p.m., Saint Jerome, Philadelphia
Thursday, March 7 at 4 p.m., Stella Maris, Philadelphia
Monday, March 11 at 6 p.m., Saint Joseph, Spring City
Thursday, March 14 at 4:30 p.m., Our Lady of the Rosary, Coatesville
Saturday, March 16 at 10 a.m., & 2 p.m., Saint Bede the Venerable, Holland
Monday, March 18 at 4 p.m., Saint Joseph, Collingdale
Thursday, March 21 at 4 p.m., Holy Name of Jesus, Philadelphia
Friday, March 22 at 4 p.m., Saint Andrew, Newtown
Saturday, March 23 at 9:30 a.m., & 1:30 p.m., Saint Andrew, Newtown
Saturday, April 6 at 10 a.m., Saints Simon and Jude, West Chester
Thursday April 11 at 4 p.m., Immaculate Conception B.V.M., Levittown
Sunday, April 14 at 10 a.m., Saint Malachy, Philadelphia
Monday, April 15 at 4 p.m., Saints Peter and Paul, West Chester
Thursday, April 18 at 4 p.m., Saint Andrew the Apostle, Drexel Hill
Saturday, April 20 at 10 a.m., & 1:30 p.m., Saints Philip and James, Exton
Sunday, April 21 at 10 a.m., Our Lady of the Blessed Sacrament, Philadelphia
Monday, April 22 at 4 p.m., Saint Basil the Great, Kimberton
Thursday, April 25 at 4 p.m., Saint Mark, Bristol
Monday, April 29 at 4 p.m., Visitation B.V.M. (Trooper), Norristown
Saturday, May 4 at 10 a.m., Saint John the Evangelist, Morrisville
Monday, May 6 at 4 p.m., Saint Cyril of Jerusalem, Jamison
Tuesday, May 7 at 4 p.m., Saint Patrick, Kennett Square

CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND MICHAEL J. FITZGERALD
(Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia)


Sunday, February 10 at 10:15 a.m., Saint Francis de Sales, Philadelphia
Saturday, February 23 at 10 a.m., Visitation B.V.M., Philadelphia
Saturday, March 2 at 10 a.m., and 2 p.m., Saint Eleanor, Collegeville
Monday, March 4 at 4 p.m., Saint Robert Bellarmine, Warrington
Thursday, March 7 at 4 p.m., Saint Joseph the Worker, Fallsington
Saturday, March 9 at 10 a.m., and 2 p.m., Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Doylestown
Sunday, March 10 at 3 p.m., Maternity B.V.M., Philadelphia
Thursday, March 14 at 4 p.m., Saint Joseph, Warrington
Saturday, March 16 at 10 a.m., Saint Stanislaus, Lansdale
Monday, March 18 at 4 p.m., Saint Albert the Great, Huntingdon Valley
Tuesday, March 19 at 4 p.m., Saint Alice, Upper Darby
Thursday, March 21 at 4 p.m., Saint Martin of Tours, Philadelphia
Saturday, April 6 at 10 a.m., and 2 p.m., Saint Ignatius of Antioch, Yardley
Sunday, April 7 at 2 p.m., Our Lady of the Assumption, Strafford
Monday, April 8 at 4 p.m., Sacred Heart (Manoa), Havertown
Thursday, April 11 at 4 p.m., Saint Francis of Assisi, Springfield
Saturday, April 13 at 10:30 a.m., Holy Cross, Springfield
Sunday, April 14 at 11:30 a.m., Saint Ambrose, Philadelphia
Monday, April 15 at 4 p.m., Saint Lawrence, Reigelsville
Thursday, April 18 at 4 p.m., Our Lady of Fatima, Bensalem
Saturday, April 20 at 5 p.m., Saint James, Elkins Park
Sunday, April 21 at 11 a.m., Our Mother of Consolation, Philadelphia
Thursday, April 25 at 4 p.m., Assumption B.V.M., Feasterville

CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND LOUIS A. DE SIMONE
(Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia)


Sunday, March 10 at 12 p.m., Saints Cosmas and Damian, Conshohocken
Tuesday, March 19 at 4 p.m., Epiphany of Our Lord, Plymouth Meeting
Sunday, April 7 at 12 Noon Our Lady of Lourdes, Philadelphia
Wednesday, April 10 at 4 p.m., Saint Nicholas of Tolentine, Philadelphia
Saturday, April 13 at 11 a.m., Our Lady of Consolation, Philadelphia
Sunday, April 14 at 1 p.m., Saint Thomas of Villanova, Rosemont
Saturday, May 4 at 10 a.m., Saint Charles Borromeo, Drexel Hill
Saturday, May 18 at 11 a.m., Saint John Baptist Vianney, Gladwyne

CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND ROBERT P. MAGINNIS
(Retired Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia)


Saturday, May 4 at 11 a.m., Saint John Neumann, Bryn Mawr
Sunday, May 5 at 12 p.m., Saint Francis of Assisi, Norristown
Tuesday, May 7 at 4 p.m., Saint Agnes, Sellersville

CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND JOSEPH F. MARTINO
(Retired Bishop of Scranton)


Thursday, March 7 at 4 p.m., Saint Cyril of Alexandria, East Lansdowne
Tuesday, March 12 at 4 p.m., Saint Titus (East Norriton), Norristown
Saturday, March 16 at 10 a.m., & 2 p.m., Saint Joseph, Downingtown
Tuesday, March 19 at 4 p.m., Holy Saviour, Norristown
Thursday, March 21 at 4 p.m., Saint Matthew, Conshohocken
Saturday, March 23 at 10 a.m., Our Lady of Guadalupe, Buckingham
Tuesday, April 2 at 4 p.m., Our Lady of Good Counsel, Southampton
Saturday, April 6 at 5:30 p.m., Saint Agatha-Saint James, Philadelphia
Sunday, April 7 at 2 p.m., Our Lady Help of Christians, Abington
Tuesday, April 9 at 4 p.m., Resurrection of Our Lord, Philadelphia
Wednesday, April 10 at 4 p.m., Saint David, Willow Grove
Thursday, April 11 at 4 p.m., Saint Gabriel, Norwood
Saturday, April 13 at 10 a.m., & 2 p.m., Saint Patrick, Malvern
Thursday, April 18 at 4 p.m., Saint Genevieve, Flourtown
Sunday, April 21 at 10:30 a.m., Saint Paul [East Norriton], Norristown
Tuesday, April 23 at 4 p.m., Saint Mary, Schwenksville
Sunday, April 28 at 10:30 a.m., Our Lady of Hope, Philadelphia
Saturday, May 4 at 10 a.m., Blessed Teresa of Calcutta, Limerick
Sunday, May 5 at 11 a.m., Saint Philip Neri, Philadelphia
Tuesday, May 14 at 4 p.m., Saint John Chrysostom, Wallingford
Thursday, May 16 at 4 p.m., Our Mother of Good Counsel, Bryn Mawr
Saturday, May 18 at 5:30 p.m., Saint Veronica, Philadelphia
Sunday, May 19 at 10:15 a.m., Saint Joseph, Coatesville
Tuesday, May 21 at 4 p.m., Mother of Divine Providence, King of Prussia
Wednesday, May 22 at 4 p.m., Sacred Heart of Jesus, Philadelphia
Thursday, May 23 at 4 p.m., Saint Maria Goretti, Hatfield
Saturday, June 1 at 10 a.m. & 3:30 p.m., Saint Rocco, Avondale

CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND NELSON J. PEREZ
(Auxiliary Bishop of Rockville Centre)


Saturday, April 20 at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Saint Agnes, West Chester


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Statement Of Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.f.m. Cap. Regarding Today's Announcement From The Vatican

February 11, 2013

STATEMENT OF ARCHBISHOP CHARLES J. CHAPUT, O.F.M. CAP.
REGARDING TODAY'S ANNOUNCEMENT FROM THE VATICAN


"From his work as a young theologian at Vatican II to his ministry as universal pastor of the Church, Joseph Ratzinger has served God and the global Christian community with intelligence, eloquence and extraordinary self-sacrifice.

As Pope Benedict XVI, he has led God's people through complicated times with uncommon grace, and his stepping down now, at 85, from the burdens of his office is another sign of his placing the needs of the Church above his own. Catholics worldwide owe him a tremendous debt of gratitude. He will remain in our hearts and always be in our prayers."

+Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.
Archbishop of Philadelphia


###


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Preparing For The Journey Of Lent, 2013

February 11, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
PREPARING FOR THE JOURNEY OF LENT, 2013


More than 70 years ago the great French Catholic writer Georges Bernanos published a little essay called "Sermon of an Agnostic on the Feast of St. Théresè." Bernanos deeply loved the Church, but he could also be brutally candid when it came to himself and his fellow believers. Above all, he had a piercing sense of irony about the comfortable, the self-satisfied and the lukewarm who postured themselves as Catholic - whether they were laypeople or clergy.

In his essay he imagined "what any decent agnostic of average intelligence might say, if by some impossible chance the [pastor] were to let him stand awhile in the pulpit [on] the day consecrated to St. Théresè of Lisieux."

"Dear brothers," says the agnostic from the pulpit, "many unbelievers are not as hardened as you imagine. … [But when] we seek [Christ] now, in this world, it is you we find, and only you. … It is you Christians who participate in divinity, as your liturgy proclaims; it is you 'divine men' who ever since [Christ's] ascension have been his representatives on earth. … You are the salt of the earth. [So if] the world loses its flavor, who is it I should blame? … The New Testament is eternally young. It is you who are so old. … Because you do not live your faith, your faith has ceased to be a living thing."

Bernanos had little use for the learned, the proud or the superficially religious. He believed instead in the little flowers - the Thérèses of Lisieux - that sustain the Church and convert the world by the purity, simplicity, innocence and zeal of their faith. That kind of innocent faith is a gift. It's a gift each of us can ask for, and each of us will receive, if we just have the courage to choose it and then act on it. The only people who ever really change the world are saints. Each of us can be one of them. But we need to want sainthood, and then we need to follow the path that comes with it.

Bernanos once wrote that the optimism of the modern world, including its "politics of hope," is like whistling past a graveyard. It's a cheap substitute for real hope and "a sly form of selfishness, a method of isolating [ourselves] from the unhappiness of others" by thinking happy or seemingly progressive thoughts. Real hope "must be won. [We] can only attain hope through truth, at the cost of great effort and long patience. … Hope is a virtue, virtus, strength; an heroic determination of the soul. [And] the highest form of hope is despair overcome."

We can only attain hope through truth. And what that means is this: From the moment Jesus said, "I am the way, the truth and the life," the most important public statement anyone can make is "Jesus Christ is Lord."

This year, Ash Wednesday falls on February 13. It marks the beginning of Lent. For Catholics, this is a time to be honest; to take an unblinking look at the truth of our lives. Every year God offers us this great season of humility as a chance to remember who we are as believers, reflect soberly on our actions and refocus ourselves on the source of our hope, the only real hope of a bloody and despairing world: Jesus Christ. We do this through prayer, silence, the sacrament of penance, seeking out and reconciling with those whom we've hurt, forgiving those who've hurt us, generosity to the poor, and fasting, not just from food, but from all those many things that distract us from the God who made and loves us.

If we call ourselves Christians, then let's live like we mean it - beginning today, with this Lenten season; so that people who look upon us will see the presence of Jesus Christ instead.

###


Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Launches 2013 Catholic Charities Appeal

February 15, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA LAUNCHES
2013 CATHOLIC CHARITIES APPEAL


Today, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia announces the launch of the 2013 Catholic Charities Appeal. The theme of this year's Appeal "Charity Transforming Reality," calls to mind the impact, change and difference people can make in the lives of others through their generosity. Archbishop Charles Chaput is encouraging the faithful within the Archdiocese to support the Appeal by setting a $10 million fundraising goal.

The Appeal is the single largest fundraising initiative in the Archdiocese directly supporting Catholic Social Services, which provides help and creates hope for nearly 3,500 people every day-over 200,000 people each year.

"The Catholic Charities Appeal is critical to the good works of the Church in Philadelphia. It allows us to help transform the lives of thousands of men, women, children and families by tirelessly reaching out to those with spiritual, emotional, physical or material needs during a time when they often don't know where to turn," said Archbishop Chaput. "As Christians, it is our job to put these people first in our hearts and in our generosity. We can make a lasting and profound impact on our region and its people by transforming the lives of many through this Appeal. Today, we begin this process by taking a step forward to make this ambitious fundraising goal a reality."

Despite the current national financial climate, last year's Catholic Charities Appeal saw a dramatic growth in the number of donors with a nearly 67 percent increase in gifts received. Of the more than 56,000 donations, nearly 50 percent of the gifts came from donors who either returned after having been away for a year or more, or who had not previously donated.

The Appeal is the major source of private funds supporting Catholic Social Services programs in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, including senior centers, educational and afterschool programs for at-risk children and youth, residential support for persons with disabilities, and homeless shelters and community food cupboards.

"The valuable partnership between the city of Philadelphia and Catholic Charities Appeal allows hundreds of thousands to be cared for every year and it provides hope for the most vulnerable among us," said Thomas Scheaffer, Director of Policy & Evaluation in the Deputy Mayor's Office for Health & Opportunity and the City's OST System of Systems Project Lead. "I commend the unwavering efforts of Catholic Charities Appeal to promote community participation and involvement in an effort to better the lives of so many children, homeless, abused, hungry and the aged men and women in our city who need our help."

Founded in 1958 by John Cardinal O'Hara, the Catholic Charities Appeal funds more than 80 programs throughout the five counties of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. The services that the Archdiocese provides reflect a belief in the sanctity of human life, the dignity of the individual, and the central role of the family in life and society.

# # #


Editor's Note: For information about The Catholic Charities Appeal please contact 215-587-3651 or visit www.catholiccharitiesappeal.org.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Cathedral Basilica Of Saints Peter And Paul To Be Presented With Two Telly Awards

February 15, 2013

CATHEDRAL BASILICA OF SAINTS PETER AND PAUL TO BE PRESENTED WITH TWO TELLY AWARDS


The Philadelphia Visitors Channel will present Monsignor Author Rodgers, Rector of the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul, a People's Telly and a Bronze Telly Award.

They are being awarded for the video titled Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul, which offers a tour of the Cathedral while highlighting its spiritual richness and historic significance.

Monday, February 18, 2013
12:30 p.m.
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul Rectory
1723 Race Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103



Votes from viewers on the Internet helped the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul video win the People's Telly Silver Award, a first place award, in the non-broadcast Travel and Tourism category. The Bronze Telly was awarded in a judged competition.


###


Editor's Note: For more information on The Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul visit http://www.cathedralphila.org/

To view the ward winning video visit:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0tMUTE_KUA4&list=UUNj8N7keDzDr4v6bYxR_nSg&index=54


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Justice, Prudence And Immigration Reform

February 19, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
JUSTICE, PRUDENCE AND IMMIGRATION REFORM


The Catholic commitment to the dignity of the immigrant comes from exactly the same roots as our commitment to the dignity of the unborn child. Any Catholic who truly understands his or her faith knows that the right to life precedes and creates the foundation for every other human right. There's no getting around the priority of that fundamental right to life. But being "prolife" also means that we need to make laws and social policies that will care for those people already born that no one else will defend.

Around the United States today, we employ a permanent underclass of human beings who build our roads, pick our fruit, clean our hotel rooms, and landscape our lawns. Most of these men and women, like millions of immigrants before them, abide by our laws and simply want a better life for their families. Many have children who are American citizens, or who have been in America so long that they don't know any other homeland. But they live in a legal limbo. They're important to our economy, but they have inadequate legal protections, and in recent years many families have been separated by arrests and deportations.

We need to remember that how we treat the weak, the infirm, the elderly, the unborn child and the foreigner reflects on our own humanity. We become what we do, for good or for evil. The Catholic Church respects the law, including immigration law. We respect those men and women who have the difficult job of enforcing it. We do not encourage or help anyone to break the law. We believe Americans have a right to solvent public institutions, secure borders and orderly regulation of immigration.

At the same time, we can't ignore people in need, and we shouldn't be silent about laws that don't work - or that, in their "working," create impossible contradictions and suffering. Despite all of the heated public argument over the past decade, Americans still find themselves stuck with an immigration system that adequately serves no one. We urgently need the kind of immigration reform that will address our economic and security needs, but will also regularize the status of the many decent undocumented immigrants who help our society to grow. Congress and the president, despite their serious differences, do have an opportunity in the coming months to act justly to solve this problem. Legislation could begin moving in congress as early as this spring.

The bishops of the United States have suggested at least five key elements needed for any serious reform: (1) a path to citizenship for the undocumented; (2) the preservation and enhancement of family unity, based on the union of a husband and wife and their children; (3) the creation of legal channels for unskilled laborers to enter and work legally in this country; (4) due process rights for immigrants; and (5) constructive attention to the root causes of migration, such as economic hardship, political repression or religious persecution in the sending countries.

As many as 11 million undocumented persons now live and work in our nation. We can't refuse to see them. Catholics of good will can legitimately disagree on the best way to bring about immigration justice. In an age of terrorism and organized drug violence, public safety is a pressing and understandable concern. There are also pitfalls and unhelpful agendas in some elements of the immigration debate that need careful discussion. But again, we can't simply continue to posture and delay in dealing with an issue that impacts so many lives.

We become what we do, for good or for evil. If we act and speak like bigots, that's what we become. If we act with justice, intelligence, common sense and mercy, then we become something quite different. We become the people and the nation God intended us to be. Our country's chronic immigration crisis is a test of our humanity. Whether we pass that test is entirely up to us. That's why the Catholic community needs to engage the issue of immigration reform as prudently and unselfishly as possible - not tomorrow or next week, but now. The future of our country depends on it.

The U.S. bishops' "Justice for Immigrants" campaign can be accessed at www.justiceforimmigrants.org

###


Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Celebrate Sunday Mass In Thanksgiving For The Petrine Ministry Of Our Holy Father, Pope Benedict XVI

February 22, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO CELEBRATE SUNDAY MASS
IN THANKSGIVING FOR THE PETRINE MINISTRY
OF OUR HOLY FATHER, POPE BENEDICT XVI


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will celebrate a Mass of Thanksgiving this Sunday for the ministry of Pope Benedict XVI.

Sunday, February 24, 2013
5:30 p.m. (Confessions)
6:30 p.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19130


All priests are invited to concelebrate and all of the faithful are welcome to attend. Liturgical and pastoral guidance has been provided to assist clergy and faithful throughout the Archdiocese of Philadelphia during this period of the papal transition to unite all in prayer with the whole Church, and with one another.


Archbishop Chaput will offer Mass on Sunday, March 3, 2013, to pray for the election of a new Pope.
An additional Mass will take place upon the election of the new Supreme Pontiff at a date yet to be determined.

# # #


Editor's Note: Further information, including liturgical aids are available on the website of the Office for Divine Worship at http://archphila.org/evangelization/worship/worship.htm.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

The Vatican Confirms The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia As Host Of The Eighth World Meeting Of Families And Sets September 22-27, 2015 As The Official Event Dates

February 22, 2013

THE VATICAN CONFIRMS THE ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA AS HOST OF THE EIGHTH
WORLD MEETING OF FAMILIES
AND SETS SEPTEMBER 22-27, 2015 AS THE OFFICIAL EVENT DATES


His Holiness, Pope Benedict XVI, announces the official dates for the Eighth World Meeting of Families, which will be celebrated in the United States for the first time in its history. It is expected to draw tens of thousands from around the world to the City of Philadelphia.


In a statement issued from Vatican City today, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia has been officially confirmed as the host city for the Eighth World Meeting of Families to take place September 22-27, 2015. Selected as the host city by The Holy Father, Pope Benedict XVI, in coordination with the Pontifical Council for the Family, this marks the first time the United States will welcome this event, which was last hosted by Milan, Italy in June 2012.

Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. offered remarks expressing gratitude and excitement as Philadelphia begins to plan for the World Meeting of Families. "The World Meeting of Families is a gift not just to Catholics in Philadelphia, but to every person of good will in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, the surrounding region and our nation. I am very pleased that our Archdiocese has been selected to host this important event. A gathering like the World Meeting of Families demands a great deal of planning, but it is an opportunity filled with grace. This event has the power to transform, in deeply positive ways, not just the spirit of Catholic life in our area, but our entire community. Our Archdiocese looks forward to welcoming visitors from around the world with a generous heart."

Since its inception by Blessed John Paul II in 1994, the World Meeting of Families has sought to strengthen the sacred bonds of family across the globe. Each World Meeting of Families has a theme, which aims to emphasize the good news of the family and highlight its intrinsic value to the good of society. The theme for the 2015 World Meeting of Families will be forthcoming following the election of a new Pontiff.

The Archdiocese also announced today that Governor Tom Corbett of Pennsylvania and Mayor Michael Nutter of Philadelphia have graciously accepted Archbishop Chaput's invitation to serve as Honorary Co-Chairs of the 2015 World Meeting of Families.

Governor Corbett expressed his enthusiasm for the event saying, "I am deeply pleased to join with Mayor Nutter as Honorary Co-Chair of the World Meeting of Families. Philadelphia is the birthplace of religious freedom and our churches, synagogues, mosques and temples are places of both personal faith and civic freedom. But it is our families that grow up in these institutions that are the foundation of that freedom. This special event is not only an opportunity to welcome families from around the world but an opportunity to celebrate our distinctive religious heritage as a state and a nation."

Echoing the Governor's sentiments, Mayor Nutter said, "We are delighted and honored that Philadelphia has been selected to host the World Meeting of Families by The Holy Father. Family is the cornerstone of society and strengthening it serves all of our people in Philadelphia - Catholic and non-Catholic alike. I look forward to working with Archbishop Chaput, Governor Corbett and the citizens of Philadelphia to deliver a truly memorable event for the tens of thousands of families we will welcome to our city in September 2015."


The World Meeting of Families draws a global audience. In Milan for the Seventh World Meeting, 153 nations were represented, 350,000 attended the Feast of Testimonies and more than one million participated in the Mass celebrated by the Holy Father. Beginning in 1994, during The Year of the Family, the Pontifical Council has been responsible for organizing the World Meetings of Families in Rome (1994); Rio de Janeiro (1997); Rome (2000); Manila (2003); Valencia (2006); Mexico City (2009); Milan (2012); and now, Philadelphia (2015).

For more information regarding the World Meeting of Families in Philadelphia in September 2015, please visit www.archphila.org or www.WorldMeeting2015.org.

###


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Remarks Of Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.f.m. Cap. News Conference Regarding The World Meeting Of Families

February 25, 2013

REMARKS OF ARCHBISHOP CHARLES J. CHAPUT, O.F.M. CAP.
NEWS CONFERENCE REGARDING THE WORLD MEETING OF FAMILIES


Good Morning.

We received some news a few weeks ago that we can share with you today. As announced by the Vatican early this morning, Philadelphia has been confirmed by His Holiness, Pope Benedict XVI, as the host city for the Eighth World Meeting of Families. The official dates set for this gathering are September 22 - September 27, 2015. This marks the first time an American city has hosted the World Meeting of Families and we're deeply grateful that the Archdiocese of Philadelphia has been selected for this honor.

Before I saying anything else, I want to thank the Holy Father for choosing Philadelphia and for setting these dates before he concludes his ministry as pastor of the universal Church. The Holy Father recognizes that gatherings of this magnitude demand a great deal of planning and work so he set the date before his leaving. They draw many thousands of people - in this case, many thousands of families with children of all ages. But these events also become moments of grace. They have the power to transform, in deeply positive ways, not just the spirit of Catholic life in our region, but the whole public community. We're excited to officially begin this journey.

The World Meeting of Families is meant to be a gift not just to Catholics in Philadelphia, but to every person of good will in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the surrounding areas. Everyone with a generous heart is welcome to be a part of it, and I'll be working closely with my brother bishops in the months ahead to encourage families across the United States and Canada and around the world to come to Philadelphia in September 2015.

I'll also be working closely with two public leaders who represent our City and our Commonwealth with distinction. It's my pleasure to announce that Governor Tom Corbett and Mayor Michael Nutter have kindly accepted my invitation to serve as the Honorary Co-Chairs of the 2015 World Meeting of Families. Philadelphia's Catholic community is very, very grateful for their support. I look forward to traveling with both the Governor and the Mayor to Rome in the next several months, after the election of the new Pope, for briefing sessions with the Pontifical Council for The Family. I'm also very pleased that Mayor Nutter could be with us today despite his very busy schedule.

I've been asked why the Holy Father picked Philadelphia. Some of you may have asked that question. The answer is simple. His Holiness didn't tell me, so I don't know. But it's helpful to remember that Philadelphia is uniquely rich in America's history. It's where the United States began as a nation, and the political ideals conceived in Philadelphia have served human rights, human freedom and human dignity for more than two centuries. Pope Benedict has spoken about all these issues, especially religious liberty, many times throughout his pontificate. And he's always seen the strength of the family as a guarantee of human maturity and freedom. The more we encourage and support the integrity of families, the healthier society becomes.

Philadelphia is also an American Catholic icon, with two great American saints - Mother Katharine Drexel and Bishop John Neumann -- a great Church legacy of Catholic education, and many decades of service to immigrants, minorities, the hungry and the poor. That service continues right now, today, in all our Catholic social ministries. We're very proud of the Catholic Church in Philadelphia.

The Church in Philadelphia is also a community in need of healing and renewal. We have a very serious duty to help persons who have been hurt in the past to heal, and to better protect children and young people moving forward.

Beyond this important duty, the Church still has the obligation to preach Jesus Christ. She still has the duty to help people find God and to live their faith with joy and conviction.

I think faithful Catholics in Philadelphia and everywhere else know that. And they long for a chance to show their love of God and his Church to the world, to deepen God's presence in their own families, and to share Jesus Christ with a world that urgently needs him. That's why - with the help of God, and if we're faithful to the tasks this great effort requires - the World Meeting of Families in 2015 will achieve everything it needs to accomplish, and everything God intends.

I'm happy to answer questions in a bit, but now I'd now like to introduce the Mayor of our wonderful City of Philadelphia and an Honorary Co-Chair of the 2015 World Meeting of Families, Michael Nutter.

###


Editor's Note: For more information regarding the World Meeting of Families in Philadelphia in September 2015, please visit www.archphila.org or www.WorldMeeting2015.org.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop To Celebrate Closing Mass At The 5th Annual Men's Spirituality Conference This Year's Theme Comes From John 20:21 "as The Father Has Sent Me, So I Send You."

February 28, 2013

ARCHBISHOP TO CELEBRATE CLOSING MASS AT
THE 5th ANNUAL MEN'S SPIRITUALITY CONFERENCE

This year's theme comes from John 20:21 "As the Father has sent me, so I send you."


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will celebrate the Closing Mass at the 5th Annual Men's Spirituality Conference hosted by Men Up Philly. Catholic men from across the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will come together for a day of prayer and fellowship at the Fifth Annual Men's Spirituality Conference.

Saturday, March 2, 2013
8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. (Conference)
2:30 p.m. (Mass)
Archbishop Ryan High School
11201 Academy Road
Philadelphia, PA 19154


This year's feature presenters are best-selling author, teacher, and speaker on Blessed John Paul II's Theology of the Body, Christopher West, and Jim Towey, the President of Ave Maria University and former personal attorney for Mother Theresa of Calcutta.

Other speakers include: Richard Lane, Co-founder of Catholic Men for Christ Men's Conference in St. Louis, Missouri and a leading and prolific Catholic speaker; and Don Saleski, a former Philadelphia Flyer. Mr. Saleski played a total of nine seasons in the NHL.

# # #



Editor's Note:, For more information on the Men's Spirituality Conference please visit http://manupphilly.com/.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Celebrate Sunday Mass For The Election Of A New Pope

March 1, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO CELEBRATE SUNDAY MASS
FOR THE ELECTION OF A NEW POPE


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will celebrate a Mass this Sunday for the election of a new Pope.

Sunday, March 3, 2013
5:30 p.m. (Confessions)
6:30 p.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19130


All priests are invited to concelebrate and all of the faithful are welcome to attend. Liturgical and pastoral guidance has been provided to assist clergy and faithful throughout the Archdiocese of Philadelphia during this period of the papal transition to unite all in prayer with the whole Church, and with one another.


Archbishop Chaput will offer an additional Mass upon the election of the new Supreme Pontiff at a date yet to be determined.

# # #


Editor's Note: Further information, including liturgical aids are available on the Archdiocesan Observance of the Papal Transition webpage http://archphila.org/papal-transition/papal.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Announces Formation Of Executive Board Of Elementary Education And Five County Advisory Councils

March 4, 2013

THE ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA ANNOUNCES
FORMATION OF EXECUTIVE BOARD OF ELEMENTARY EDUCATION AND
FIVE COUNTY ADVISORY COUNCILS


Today, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced the creation of an Executive Board of Elementary Education. This entity is formed in response to recommendations from the Blue Ribbon Commission and was created to better assist local pastors, parishes, elementary and regional schools with strategic planning, marketing, enrollment and governance to help sustain, grow, and strengthen their schools. In addition to the Executive Board, Advisory Councils for elementary education will be created in each of the surrounding five counties.

Together the Executive Board of Elementary Education and the County Advisory Councils will work closely and leverage the support of the Faith in the Future Foundation, Business Leadership Organized for Catholic Schools (BLOCS) and the Independent Mission Schools.

Bishop Michael J. Fitzgerald, who oversees Catholic education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, and will serve as the chair of the Executive Board, said, "The Executive Board of Elementary Education and the five County Advisory Councils will work very closely with the Office of Catholic Education and the principals of the elementary schools." Fitzgerald said. "The collective mission of the Executive Board and the Advisory Councils will be to understand and plan for the demographic shifts, enrollment trends, and financial pressures that all schools face today so that working more strategically across the counties we can provide accessible, affordable, high quality Catholic education for all of those who desire it."

The Executive Board has been working since October 2012 to confirm potential members and assist in the formation of the five County Advisory Councils. The County Advisory Council members will be appointed by the regional bishop in each of the five counties. Each council will be made up of principals, pastors, parents and representatives from the community.

The current members of the Executive Board of Elementary Education are: Monsignor Joseph Marino, Pastor of Our Lady of the Assumption Parish, Chester County; Monsignor Daniel Kutys, Moderator of the Curia for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia; Sister Carroll Isselmann, I.H.M., Director of Strategic Initiatives at Immaculata University; Victoria Kim Flaville, Senior Vice President for Programs and Chief Operating Office for the Connelly Foundation; Paul Mullholland, Retired Treasurer at Sunoco, Inc.; Gerald J. Parsons, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Communications Test Design, Inc. (CTDI); Brian Zwaan, Co-founder, President, Chief Operating Officer, Chief Lending Officer and Director of Penn Liberty Bank; Alfred Christopher Dezzi, Vice President, Treasurer and Director, The Dezzi Group, LTD; Monsignor Michael J. Matz, Pastor, St. Genevieve Parish, Montgomery County; and Jacqueline Coccia, Superintendent of Elementary Schools for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

# # #


Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Charles Borromeo And The Work Of New Beginnings

March 7, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
CHARLES BORROMEO AND THE WORK OF NEW BEGINNINGS


Exactly 18 months ago this week, the Philadelphia Catholic family became my family, and the city became my home. I said at the time that the challenges we face as a Church wouldn't be easy, and they haven't been. Many of our pastoral, legal and financial problems still remain. So do our very serious obligations to victims of past abuse. But it's also true that a great deal of good has been accomplished in a short time. We need to thank God for that, and we need to take pride in the fidelity of our clergy and our people under very trying circumstances.

Especially in these days of Lent, we also need to realize that no real reform happens comfortably. It always brings some measure of pain because honestly examining our behavior hurts. Reform means just what the word suggests. It means "re-forming" Catholic life by becoming something more than baptized pagans. It means pulling apart dead habits of sin, complacency, compromise, lazy worship and cynicism - at both the personal and institutional levels - and then rebuilding our discipleship with purity and zeal. It means changing who we are into the men and women God created us to be.

As a Church, we've been here before. History never really repeats itself, but habits of human thought and behavior repeat themselves all the time. So we can learn quite a lot from the past that has meaning for our needs today.

One of history's leading Catholic reformers was Charles Borromeo. Born of a wealthy family in a time of intense religious conflict and Church corruption, Borromeo turned away from privilege to a life of personal humility and zeal for restoring the integrity of Catholic life. He organized the final session of the great reforming Council of Trent. He compiled Trent's famous catechism. As a bishop, he carried on his person a small portrait of St. John Fisher, the English bishop and friend of St. Thomas More martyred by Henry VIII. As cardinal archbishop of Milan, he became a revered patron of higher learning and the arts. Above all, Borromeo saw that the key to renewing Catholic life was a well-educated, holy priesthood. That's where he put his passion, setting the groundwork for modern priestly formation.

It's no accident that Philadelphia's own great seminary bears the name of St. Charles Borromeo. And that brings us to the point of my column this week.

In naming Bishop Timothy Senior rector of our seminary last year, I gave him two main tasks: to continue and build on the good work of his predecessor, Father Shaun Mahoney; and to lead a thorough review of seminary operations and programs. If we want to renew Catholic life in our region - and we urgently need to - then we need a new generation of well formed, intelligent, zealous priests to lead us into the future as many of our good priests today retire. That's a big job. It will take time. But the work of Bishop Senior and his colleagues is already bearing fruit in three very practical ways.

First, the seminary's board of trustees recently approved the appointment of a Task Force to review and consider the future of the college division program. Its recommendations are due later this spring. Any changes to the college program will be announced in September 2013 and take effect in Academic Year 2014-15. Chaired by Dr. Rosalie Mirenda, president of Neumann University, the Task Force will not include current seminary staff. All members will, however, have the needed expertise in higher education, seminary formation or marketing communications.

Second, the board also approved development of a new Spirituality Year. "Spirituality Years" have had great success in spurring vocations for the Church in Paris, Denver and elsewhere by offering men an intense time of reflection on the Church, the priesthood and their personal relationship with Jesus Christ outside the formal seminary curriculum. The program's placement in our current formation process is still being discussed. But it will be required for all new Philadelphia seminarians and available to all other sending dioceses, beginning in Academic Year 2014-15.

Third and finally, the board also approved plans to anchor all seminary operations in the current theology buildings. No new construction will take place, but renovation of current buildings will span the next five years. St. Charles will retain about 30 acres of the upper campus. The current college building and remaining land will be leased or sold for development to ensure the seminary's long-term sustainability. Renovation efforts will reflect any changes implemented for the college division and also the creation of the new Spirituality Year program.

These are major changes - and they're not the last ones we need to make in the way we live as a believing community. We need to reform not just our structures and programs, but our hearts, our minds and our lives. But these changes do embody the kind of new thinking we need to restore the health and confidence of the Church in Philadelphia. They're a beginning. And the future will grow from these seeds.

###


Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput Announces Plan for Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary's Future Viability and Sustainability

March 7, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT ANNOUNCES
PLAN FOR SAINT CHARLES BORROMEO SEMINARY'S
FUTURE VIABILITY AND SUSTAINABILITY

Plan allows for a more vibrant program of priestly formation to meet the needs of seminarians as well the people they will one day serve as priests in Philadelphia and throughout the country


Today, Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. announced a plan focused on the future viability and sustainability of Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary. It will bring a renewed sense of energy to the Seminary, its program of priestly formation, its program of permanent diaconate formation and educational opportunities it offers for the general public through the Graduate School of Theology.

As part of the plan, the Seminary will consolidate facilities, seek to lease or sell underutilized buildings and property, and implement new spiritual and academic programming for seminarians and lay students. While the Seminary may look different in the future, the Archbishop has affirmed his commitment to the vital importance of maintaining a Seminary for the Archdiocese and keeping it at its current location in Lower Merion Township.

"Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary is the heart of our Church in Philadelphia, and we remain dedicated to not only maintaining its presence in our community, but strengthening it for many generations to come. Our commitment to providing the best possible program of priestly formation for the benefit of our seminarians and the people they will one day serve is unwavering," said Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. "The plan being announced today will ensure the future viability and sustainability of our Seminary now and in the future."

The plan calls for the Seminary, which currently occupies more than 75 acres of land and 19 buildings, to consolidate its entire operation. The College Division program, which is currently on the lower portion of the campus, will move into vacant space within the Theology Division buildings on the upper side of the campus over the next three to five years as necessary renovations are completed.

As a result of this consolidation, the Seminary will retain 30 acres of land as well as sufficient space for classrooms, dormitories and offices. It will be positioned for future growth to support up to 200 seminarians, all candidates discerning vocations to the permanent diaconate and hundreds of full and part-time students enrolled in the Graduate School of Theology, which offers graduate degrees and catechetical certificate programs for clergy and the laity.

A committee of the Seminary's Board of Trustees led a critical review of the buildings and land currently comprising the College Division, which have been underutilized for some time. There are no specific plans for the College Division buildings at this time. The Board of Trustees will work closely with the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, Lower Merion Township and the community to develop a comprehensive strategy to re-purpose that portion of the campus with the goal of sustaining and supporting the Seminary well into the future.

Before renovations to the Theology Division buildings commence, a task force has been appointed to review the programs offered within the College Division. Its members will provide recommendations by the end of June. The Seminary seeks to implement changes and enhancements to the programs in that area for the 2014-2015 academic year.

"Our Seminary has served as a leading institution in the formation of Catholic men for the priesthood in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and dioceses across the country for over 180 years," said Bishop Timothy Senior, Rector of Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary. "While the Seminary evolves and takes on a slightly different look in the coming years, our four pillars of human, spiritual, intellectual and pastoral growth will remain strong. We will be better poised than ever to prepare men to become servant leaders who proclaim the Gospel."

As an additional part of the plan, the Seminary's Board of Trustees has also approved the development of a Spirituality Year Program to commence in academic year 2014-2015. This new program will be situated in the Theology Division building. It will allow seminarians to dedicate a full year to discernment of their priestly vocation and to be fully engaged during that time in the spiritual and human dimensions of the formation process.

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Editor's Note: For more information on Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary please visit www.scs.edu.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Celebrate 16th Annual Cultural Heritage Mass One Faith - Many Cultural Traditions Is This Year's Theme

March 11, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO CELEBRATE
16TH ANNUAL CULTURAL HERITAGE MASS

One Faith - Many Cultural Traditions is this year's theme


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will be the celebrant and homilist at the annual Cultural Heritage Mass. This Mass celebrates the rich history and diversity among the faithful of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

Saturday, March 16, 2013
Procession (9:30 a.m.)
Mass (10:00 a.m.)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Each year, the Cultural Heritage Mass welcomes representatives from all ethnic communities. Participants from approximately 20 countries will participate in the procession carrying banners and wearing ethnic clothing.

In addition to a large procession honoring ethnic diversity, seven choirs will provide music throughout the Mass. Scriptures readings and prayers will be proclaimed in five different languages including Swahili, Vietnamese and Indonesian. The faithful in attendance at this annual Mass represent the many Catholic immigrants who call the Philadelphia region home. All are welcome to attend.

The Cultural Heritage Mass is sponsored by the Office for Pastoral Care for Migrants and Refugees.

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Editor's Note: For more information on the Mass and the Office for Pastoral Care for Migrants and Refugees please visit http://archphila.org/evangelization/pastcare/pastcare.htm.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Statement Of Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.f.m. Cap. Upon The Election Of Our New Holy Father, Pope Francis

March 13, 2013

STATEMENT OF ARCHBISHOP CHARLES J. CHAPUT, O.F.M. CAP.
UPON THE ELECTION OF OUR NEW HOLY FATHER, POPE FRANCIS


I first met our new Holy Father at Rome's 1997 Synod for America, and still have a gift from him, a portrait of Mary, the mother of Jesus, on my desk.

Pope Francis, the former Cardinal Bergoglio, is a man from the new heartland of the global Church; a priest of extraordinary intellectual and cultural strengths; a man deeply engaged in the issues of contemporary life and able to speak to the modern heart; open to the new realities the Church faces; and rooted in a deep love of Jesus Christ. He is a wonderful choice; a pastor God sends not just to the Church but to every person of good will who honestly yearns for justice, peace and human dignity in our time. May God grant him courage and joy, and sustain him with his divine presence.

And may Catholics in Philadelphia and around the world lift him up with our prayers.

# # #


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Statement From The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Regarding Cyo Sports

March 14, 2013

STATEMENT FROM THE ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA
REGARDING CYO SPORTS


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia's Catholic Youth Organization (CYO) recently concluded a review of its existing policy limiting full contact sports to boys only.

That policy reflected the Catholic thought that gender differences are important and play a large role in the development of mature Christian male and female identity. It was also written in an effort to serve the distinct needs and abilities of male and female athletes and to ensure safety.

At the request of Archbishop Charles Chaput, an Archdiocesan panel of coaches, parents, pastors and experts in sports medicine and pediatrics evaluated the current CYO policy and offered their recommendation. By a wide majority, members voted to continue the policy as written. The Archbishop is grateful for their time and prudent counsel. To obtain input from the broadest possible spectrum, the Archdiocese also reviewed feedback from various other sources, both critical and supportive of the policy. Lastly, all possible factors were considered including the expectations of coaches, parents, and pastors, common current practice, legal circumstances and the CYO policies of dioceses around the country.

At the direction of the Archbishop, the Archdiocese will allow for co-ed participation in CYO football, effective in the 2013 season. This approval is provisional. The decision will be reviewed and revised in the coming several seasons, as judged appropriate by the Archdiocese. Alternate options had merit and may be revisited in the future to ensure that any CYO sports program fosters an enjoyable and safe atmosphere providing for proper human formation, sportsmanship and Christian maturity.

###


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Celebrate Mass Of Thanksgiving For Pope Francis

March 15, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO CELEBRATE
MASS OF THANKSGIVING FOR POPE FRANCIS


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will celebrate a Mass of Thanksgiving this Sunday for our new Holy Father, Pope Francis.

Sunday, March 17, 2013
5:30 p.m. (Confessions)
6:30 p.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103



All are invited to join in this celebration of thanksgiving. Everyone throughout the Archdiocese and the Philadelphia region are invited to unite in prayer as Pope Francis assumes his new role as Supreme Pastor of the Universal Church.

# # #


Editor's Note: No mult-box feed will be available. Cameras will be permitted inside the Cathedral.

Further information, including liturgical aids are available on the Archdiocesan Observance of the Papal Transition webpage http://archphila.org/papal-transition/papal.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: A New Holy Father And The Legacy Of A Name

March 15, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
A NEW HOLY FATHER AND THE LEGACY OF A NAME


Francis is the name of several extraordinary saints. Francis Xavier, cofounder of the Jesuits, is one of history's greatest missionaries. Francis Borgia, a member of one of the most famous (and infamous) families of the Renaissance, turned away from wealth and privilege, joined the Society of Jesus and rose to become its superior general. And Francis De Sales, the great mystical writer, ascetic and bishop, founded a religious order of women with St. Jane De Chantal. He also worked closely with the Capuchin Franciscans to preach a renewed Catholic faith in his diocese in the wake of the Reformation.

But the Francis most people remember when they hear the name, including many non-Christians and non-believers, is the Poverello, "the poor one" - St. Francis of Assisi. This is the saint whose name our new Holy Father, Pope Francis, has chosen. So it's good to know a little bit about him.

St. Francis once said that "the saints lived lives of heroic virtue, [but] we are satisfied to talk about them." Francis himself wasn't satisfied with pious words. He wanted to act on the things he believed. He called his brothers to live the Gospel with simplicity and honesty. And that's why he used the words sine glossa - "without gloss" -- in his Testament. He saw that the Gospel wasn't complicated, but it was demanding and difficult. The scholars and Church lawyers of his day in the 13th century had written commentaries called glosses. And these glosses were very good at either explaining away the hard parts of the Gospel, or diminishing our need to follow Christ's demands. Francis wanted none of that. He was a radical in the truest sense. He wanted to experience discipleship at its root.

Francis lived in a time as troubled as our own. It was an age of Christians killing Christians, Muslims and Christians killing each other, wars between cities and states, and corruption both within and outside the Church. Views of society and the Church were changing. The feudal system was falling apart. For much of his life, Francis was lost in the confusion. But in his experience of faith and prayer, he came to some basic insights that gave him a very powerful inner freedom. And this enabled him to live the Gospel with simplicity and clarity in such a way that he not only was converted himself, but also became the leader of a movement of conversion in the Church and society at large.

Today the Church seems to be in similar disarray. We have all sorts of factions fighting each other, among priests, among bishops, and certainly among our laypeople. We're humiliated and shaken by the criminal sexual behavior of some of our clergy. And this has led, even for some who are deeply loyal to the Church, to a lack of confidence in our bishops, in the Church and her future, and even sometimes to a lack of confidence in Jesus Christ. We wonder if the Gospel is really true or if the Church is just another fraud.

Francis felt many of the same sentiments, and he faced many of the same questions. And yet a very clear part of his spirituality was his love for the Church, his obedience to her pastors, his unwillingness to be critical of the Church. Instead of tearing her down because of the sins of her leaders, Francis chose to love the Church and serve her -- and because of that love and by his simple living of the Gospel without compromise, he became the means God used for the renewal of a whole age of faith.

When God spoke to Francis from the cross of San Damiano - "Repair my house, which is falling into ruin" -- Francis heard it literally. He thought he was supposed to repair the chapel of San Damiano near Assisi. But of course the real call was to repair the larger Church with an interior revolution, by the personal witness of a pure and basic living of the Gospel.

The Franciscan tradition tells us that often in his life, Francis would meet with his community, and this man who was one of history's greatest saints would say to them, "Brothers, up to now we have done nothing. Let us begin." And I think that even though we've accomplished many wonderful things in the Church in Philadelphia and throughout the United States, if we want to be what God calls us to be in the years that lie ahead, we need to be like St. Francis.

Francis wasn't the only Church reformer of his day. Plenty of other men and women saw the problems in the Church and tried to do something about it. Francis wasn't even the smartest or the most talented - but he was almost certainly the most faithful, the most honest, the most humble, the most single-minded in his mission, and the most zealous in his love for Jesus Christ. And I'd argue that these marks of authentic Church renewal haven't really changed at all in 800 years.

Throughout my life, I've often turned to the Prayer of St. Francis before the Crucifix. It goes like this:

Most high, glorious God, enlighten the darkness of my heart and give me true faith, certain hope, and perfect charity, sense and knowledge, Lord, so that I may carry out your holy and true command.

It's always easier to talk about reform when the target of the reform is "out there," rather than in here. The Church does need reform. She always needs reform, which means she needs scholars and committed laypeople to help guide her, and pastors who know how to lead with humility, courage and love. But what she needs more than anything else is holiness - holy priests and holy people who love Jesus Christ and love His Church more than they love their own ideas.

Today, just like 800 years ago, the structures of the Church are so much easier to tinker with than a stubborn heart, or an empty hole where our faith should be. Reforming the Church, renewing the Church, begins with our own repentance, our own humility and willingness to serve -- and that's the really hard work, which is why sometimes so little of it seems to get done. But as our new Holy Father understands so well, it can be done. Francis showed us how. Now it's up to us to do something about it.

###


Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Office Of Catholic Education Announces Partnership Between Archbishop Ryan High School And Holy Family University

March 19, 2013

OFFICE OF CATHOLIC EDUCATION ANNOUNCES PARTNERSHIP BETWEEN
ARCHBISHOP RYAN HIGH SCHOOL AND HOLY FAMILY UNIVERSITY


Today, administrators from Archbishop Ryan High School, located in Northeast Philadelphia, were joined by officials from the Office of Catholic Education and Holy Family University to sign an agreement that enters both schools into a collaborative educational partnership. The agreement consists of three components, including admissions and scholarship, a university and dual credit agreement, and continuing education. The partnership reinforces the commitment of both schools to offer advanced educational opportunities for the personal and intellectual growth of their students and faculty.

"We are incredibly excited to be partnering with Holy Family University," said Doctor Carol Cary, Superintendent of Secondary Schools for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. "This arrangement, which further supports and enhances the mission, core values and beliefs shared by both academic institutions, will allow our students and faculty to further their education at a highly competitive local university. Archbishop Ryan students will immediately benefit from this partnership through the in-classroom experiences held at the high school with Holy Family University students and teachers. We look forward to working with Holy Family University and enhancing the educational future for our students."

Students from Archbishop Ryan High School who graduate with a 2.5 GPA or higher are eligible for admission to Holy Family University with application fees waived. Archbishop Ryan Students are also able to take dual-credit classes at Holy Family University and earn university credits that satisfy their high school graduation requirements. Teachers, administrators, staff and employees of Archbishop Ryan High School are also able to enroll in Holy Family University undergraduate and graduate courses, as well as degree programs, with waived admission fees and the opportunities for grants.

"Holy Family University takes its commitment to support area Catholic high schools very seriously," stated University President Sister Francesca Onley, CSFN, PhD. "We've always had a very good relationship with Archbishop Ryan High School, and this partnership will serve to further expand educational opportunities to their students, faulty, and staff."

Mr. Arthur Goon, MS, Chief Enrollment Officer at Holy Family University said, "We are fortunate to have Archbishop Ryan High School as a partner in this endeavor. We hope this agreement will serve as a model for developing similar partnerships with other area Catholic high schools."

Archbishop Ryan High School was founded in 1966 and was made coeducational in 1988. It is committed to empowering students to become contributing members of our Church and society. In partnership with family and community, the faculty strives to teach as Jesus did by providing spiritual, social, and service opportunities for growth. Through a comprehensive academic curriculum, the faculty challenges students to become well-rounded, life-long learners.

Holy Family University is a premier Catholic university of the liberal arts and professions with a main campus in Northeast Philadelphia and locations in Bensalem and Newtown, Pennsylvania. It has been recognized for providing outstanding undergraduate and graduate academic programs and professional career development in a faith-inspired, values-centered community. Founded in 1954 by the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth, Holy Family University offers purpose-driven, engaged students the knowledge, values, and skills to help them find their place and purpose in today's workplace and world.

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Editor's Note: For information about Archbishop Ryan High School please visit www.archbishopryan.com/ and for information about Holy Family University please visit www.holyfamily.edu/.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Holy Week And Easter Masses At The Cathedral Basilica Of Saints Peter And Paul

March 21, 2013

HOLY WEEK AND EASTER MASSES AT
THE CATHEDRAL BASILICA OF SAINTS PETER AND PAUL


Palm Sunday through Easter Sunday
March 24, 2013 - March 31, 2013


PALM SUNDAY OF THE PASSION OF THE LORD - March 24th, 11:00 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.
will be the principal celebrant and homilist.
Palm Sunday commemorates Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem and the Proclamation of the Passion. It marks the beginning of Holy Week. (no mult-box feed available)

HOLY THURSDAY CHRISM MASS - March 28th, 9:40 a.m. (Procession) 10:00 a.m. (Mass)
Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.
will be the principal celebrant and homilist. All Archdiocesan priests gather to concelebrate with the Archbishop and to renew their priestly promises. During this Mass, Archbishop Chaput will bless the Oil of Catechumens and the Oil of the Sick, and consecrate the Oil of Chrism. These holy oils are used throughout the Archdiocese during the coming year in the celebration of the Sacraments. (mult-box feed available)

For those who cannot attend the Chrism Mass, the Mass will be streamed live at www.archphila.org and broadcast on The Catholic Channel on Sirius XM, and Holy Spirit Radio
1420 AM and 1570 AM.

HOLY THURSDAY MASS OF THE LORD'S SUPPER - March 28th, 5:00 p.m.
Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.
will be the principal celebrant. Father Dennis Gill, Director of the Office for Divine Worship, will be the homilist. This Mass commemorates the Last Supper, during which Christ instituted the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist, the Sacrament of Holy Orders, and gave us His commandment to love one another. After the homily, following the example of Christ who washed the feet of the Apostles at the Last Supper, the Archbishop will wash the feet of seminarians from Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary. (mult-box feed available)

GOOD FRIDAY PASSION OF THE LORD - March 29th, 3:00 p.m.
Reverend Monsignor Arthur E. Rodgers, Rector of the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul, will be the principal celebrant and homilist at the Solemn Liturgy of the Lord's Passion, commemorating the Holy Passion and Death of Jesus Christ. The traditional adoration of the cross, led by Archbishop Chaput, will take place during the Liturgy. There will be three hours of prayer in the Cathedral from 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. during which Confession will be heard. (no mult-box feed available)

EASTER VIGIL - March 30th, 8:00 p.m.
Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.
will be the principal celebrant and homilist at the Easter Vigil Mass celebrating the Resurrection of the Lord. Four components makeup the Easter Vigil: Service of Light (Blessing of the Fire and Lighting of the Paschal Candle), Liturgy of the Word, Liturgy of Baptism, and the Liturgy of Eucharist.

After a reflective and intense period of prayer during Lent, Catechumens (those who have not been baptized) and Candidates (those who have been baptized in other faiths) will become full members of the Catholic Church at the Cathedral and parishes throughout the Archdiocese at the Easter Vigil and during Easter Time. In 2013, close to 800 new Catholics will be welcomed into the Church. (no mult-box feed available)

EASTER SUNDAY MASS - March 31st, 11:00 a.m.
Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.
will be the celebrant and homilist at the Mass of the Resurrection of the Lord. Other Masses on Easter Sunday are: 8:00 a.m., 9:30 a.m., 11:00 a.m., and 12:30 p.m. (no mult-box feed available)


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Editor's Note: There will be a mult-box feed provided for the Chrism Mass and the Mass of the Lord's Supper on Thursday, March 28, 2013. Crews will need a bnc connector and recording deck or a live truck. Broadcast Media outlets will have parking space in the Archdiocesan Pastoral Center parking lot. The parking lot entrance is located on 17th Street.

Reporters and still photographers will be permitted in the Cathedral but are asked to remain in the designated area for the media (by the side pillars). All media (including still photographers and video cameras) are asked to remain clear of the center aisles at all times.

For Masses that do not have a mult-box feed, video and still cameras are permitted in the Cathedral with the above restrictions.





Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Charles Chaput To Celebrate Annual Mass For Persons With Disabilities

March 22, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHARLES CHAPUT TO CELEBRATE
ANNUAL MASS FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will be the celebrant and homilist at the annual Mass for Persons with Disabilities. The liturgy is sponsored by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia Department of Pastoral care for Persons with Disabilities and the Deaf Apostolate, which recognizes the needs and gifts of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and facilitates their participation in the life of the Church and its faith community.


Saturday, March 23, 2013
10:15 a.m. (Musical Prelude)
10:30 a.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


The Divine Providence Village Bell Choir, composed of women with developmental disabilities, will be the featured group performing the musical prelude. The Adult and Children's Choir from Saint Patrick Parish, Malvern, will provide the Liturgical music.

All are welcome to attend this special celebration, especially families, friends, neighbors, and caregivers of those with disabilities. A reception will be held immediately following Mass in the Archdiocesan Pastoral Center at 222 North 17th Street, Philadelphia, PA, located directly behind the Cathedral.


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Editor's Note: For more information please contact the Department of Pastoral Care for Persons with Disabilities at 215-587-3530. No mult-box feed will be available for media. Cameras will be permitted inside the Cathedral.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Holy Week And The Path To Easter, 2013

March 22, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
HOLY WEEK AND THE PATH TO EASTER, 2013


A friend once described the spiritual life in this way: Each of us is a child with an instinct for beauty, and God, who is the Beauty behind all beauty, is the hidden presence we naturally seek to touch. We spend our lives reaching for that beauty. But creation is so very great, and we're so very small, that we can accomplish very little -- until God stoops down to provide us with a stool to stand on, so that we can stretch out and touch his face.

The legs of that stool are faith, hope and love; and these three great "theological virtues" are what I pray God will fill each of us with in the days of Holy Week and throughout the Easter season.

Faith gives meaning. Human beings were made for a purpose; only faith provides it; and without it the soul will die. Faith is not simply doctrines, though these are essential. Faith is not sentiment, or knowledge, or law, though all these play a vital role in our life of faith. Faith is the certitude that God exists and loves us, because he has revealed himself in the one way which doesn't leave much room for disagreement: his palpable presence in our lives.

Of course the irony, as C.S. Lewis once wrote, is that the hardest thing to believe is something we've just preached or defended to another. Before ascending to his Father, Jesus told his disciples to preach and teach the good news. That command includes us. But giving the truth away to another person can leave an empty place in our own hearts. The only way to refill that space is to turn back to God and beg him again for his presence. This is one important reason why we pray.

Hope gives joy. Every Christian sooner than later discovers that his own skills are too poor, and his sins too stubborn, to be the kind of disciple the world needs -- unless the Easter miracle is true and the resurrected Jesus, once dead but now alive again, is real and present in our lives. Hope sinks its roots in faith and flowers in joy. At the end of the day, there are no unhappy saints. Easter is the great feast of hope, and in the centuries since the empty tomb, we're all living in the morning of the Resurrection every day. We're part of an endless triumph of life; a message which sets itself, in this world, against a culture of death. The task of every believer is therefore to be a witness to the Resurrection and an agent of hope.

Finally, love gives life. Christ's love on the Good Friday cross gave life to the world on Easter. All love is fruitful. Every person's life animated by love is fertile and creates new life according to his or her unique vocation; some in the flesh, some in the spirit, but new life nonetheless. The better we love, the more we become the hands of God, sculpting the new beauty of a redeemed creation. Love draws us into God himself. And from our hearts, love calls out two other virtues which spring from it: humility, which allows us to forget ourselves and cherish the dignity of others; and courage, which enables us to live and speak the truth not as a weapon, but as a gift. It isn't enough to speak the truth. We need, as Paul wrote, to speak the truth in love.

This year during Holy Week, let's remember that the spiritual life of every Christian should be fired by the words Jesus shared with his apostles on the night he was betrayed: "This is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you" (Jn 15:12). Christ's suffering and death on Good Friday bore fruit in our salvation. When we seek to love with Christ's intensity -- as the apostles did; as every disciple is called to do -- the light of Christ's resurrection will enter our families and begin to transform every life we touch.

Such love changed the world once. It can do so again. May God grant all of us a blessed Holy Week and Easter season -- and the faith and hope, the love, humility and courage, to live Easter every day of the year.

###


Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Easter And Its Implications, Here And Now

April 2, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
EASTER AND ITS IMPLICATIONS, HERE AND NOW


"The vocation of being a 'protector,' however, is not just something involving us Christians alone; it also has a prior dimension which is simply human, involving everyone."

-- Pope Francis, inaugural Mass homily


In two short weeks, the former archbishop of Buenos Aires, now bishop of Rome and pastor of the universal Church, has won millions of hearts with his humility. But much like Blessed John XXIII, a great deal of substance seems to burn behind his simplicity, his easy manner and his dramatic public gestures. In these early days of the Easter season, we'd do well to read and pray over his March 19 inaugural Mass homily.

Francis' homily, delivered on the Solemnity of St. Joseph, focuses movingly on Joseph's role as protector of Jesus, Mary and the Church. But the real power of his words comes from the cumulative effect of his sincerity and the unadorned clarity of his message. Nothing in his homily rings false. It's a simple, compelling expression of the Church's vocation to be a witness of Christ's love in the world, spoken by a man who convincingly embodies the message. A central task of the Church, for Francis, is to serve and protect the weak, and to lead others - including the world outside the Church -- to do the same by her example. In his words:

"The vocation of being a 'protector,' however, is not just something involving us Christians alone; it also has a prior dimension which is simply human, involving everyone. It means protecting all creation, the beauty of the created world, as the Book of Genesis tells us and as Saint Francis of Assisi showed us. It means respecting each of God's creatures and respecting the environment in which we live. It means protecting people, showing loving concern for each and every person, especially children, the elderly, those in need, who are often the last we think about. It means caring for one another in our families . . . It means building sincere friendships in which we protect one another in trust, respect, and goodness. In the end, everything has been entrusted to our protection, and all of us are responsible for it."

Thus, one of the basic marks of a true shepherd must be to love and protect the people entrusted to him, Care for other people's dignity is the duty of every person in authority: every public official, every teacher and every parent. But bishops, pastors and all Christians have the added obligation to see the human person through the lens of eternity, with God's eyes and God's love. Each human person is precious and unrepeatable; intended by God from before time; made for eternal joy; and fashioned in the image and likeness of the Creator.

In many ways over many years, the Church in Philadelphia has protected the weak and served human dignity with exceptional skill - feeding the hungry, sheltering the homeless, comforting the sick and elderly, helping the immigrant. That service continues today, even in the face of our financial challenges, along with a great legacy of educating our young people in a system of outstanding schools. No similar organization comes close to matching the service provided to the general public by the Catholic community in our region.

Yet it's also true that our witness has been bitterly undermined by cases of sexual abuse of children in the past. These sins, these failures to protect innocent young people, have no excuse; they've resulted in terribly wounded lives -- survivors to whom we owe continuing help for their healing. I can and do apologize for this hurt on my own behalf and on behalf of the Church, with all my heart. But the obligation remains to prevent this kind of damage in the future.

No system is perfect. People determined to do evil sometimes find ways to circumvent the best safeguards. But over the past two years the Church in Philadelphia has done everything in her power to develop policies and procedures to protect the innocence of our young people, and to train our faithful in recognizing and reporting the signs of sexual abuse.

We've expanded and upgraded our Archdiocesan Review Board. We've rewritten our standards of ministerial behavior and sexual misconduct policies with the counsel of district attorneys. We've trained more than 30,000 adults in recognizing and reporting sexual abuse. In FY 2012 alone, we provided age-appropriate personal safety instructions, including internet safety guidance, to more than 100,000 children. Additionally, we trained 7,000 adults regarding their role as Mandated Reporters under Pennsylvania law. None of this redeems the past. But it does help ensure a better and safer future.

April is Child Abuse Prevention month. It's a painful but also a graced moment. We need to pause and remember the survivors of abuse in our actions and in our prayers - no matter where, or at the hands of whom and what institution, the abuse occurred. As the words of Pope Francis remind us, it's vital to the vocation of the Church to protect the people in her care and to lead others to do the same by her witness. In the coming years, we need to keep that fact close to our hearts, and live accordingly.

###


Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

>Parishioners From Saint John Vianney Church To Present Scholarship To Student From Saint Martin De Porres

April 3, 2013

PARISHIONERS FROM SAINT JOHN VIANNEY CHURCH
TO PRESENT SCHOLARSHIP
TO STUDENT FROM SAINT MARTIN DE PORRES


Parishioners from Saint John Vianney Church in Gladwyne, Montgomery County, will present a $3,000 a year scholarship to a current eighth grade student from Saint Martin de Porres School to attend any Archdiocesan High School for all four years. This presentation is part of the Saint John Vianney Scholars Program.

Thursday, April 4, 2013
2:30 p.m.
Saint Martin de Porres School
2300 West Lehigh Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19132


Since its official launch last year, the program has recognized 16 deserving students with a scholarship. The 2013 scholars come from the following Catholic elementary schools in the city of Philadelphia: Holy Redeemer Chinese Catholic School, Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish School, Saint Anthony of Padua Regional Catholic School, Saint Francis Cabrini Regional Catholic School Saint George Parish School and Saint Mary Interparochial School.

The mission of the Saint John Vianney Scholars Program is to provide financial and academic support to children who are involved in their community and motivated to excel in school. The program hopes to provide many students with scholarships in the coming years as well as introduce this program to other parishes in the Archdiocese. Through their partnership with the Connelly Foundation, they are also able to provide the scholarship awardees with additional resources.

For more information about the Saint John Vianney Scholars Program please visit www.sjvgladwyne.com/docs/sjv_scholars.html.

# # #


Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Statement Regarding Reverend Monsignor Richard T. Powers

April 7, 2013

STATEMENT REGARDING
REVEREND MONSIGNOR RICHARD T. POWERS


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has found Monsignor Richard T. Powers, a retired priest of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, not suitable for ministry following a substantiated allegation of sexual abuse of a minor that occurred approximately 40 years ago outside the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

Today's announcement regarding Monsignor Powers is not directly connected to the cases of priests placed on administrative leave following the February 2011 Grand Jury Report.

Background Information
In March of 2012 an internal document was discovered in response to a subpoena following the February 2011 Grand Jury Report and turned over to the courts as soon as it was found. That document included a list of priests, among whom were those who had allegations of sexual abuse against them. All of those priests were either deceased, laicized, or living a life of prayer and penance with the exception of Monsignor Powers.

Subsequent to turning the list over to the courts last year, the Archdiocese placed Monsignor Powers on leave, and began its customary investigation. During that time Monsignor Powers was not permitted to exercise his public ministry, administer any of the Sacraments, wear clerical garb, or present himself publicly as a priest.

An announcement concerning this situation was made last year at Epiphany of Our Lord Parish in Philadelphia, where Monsignor Powers had been residing. The Archdiocese was not permitted to make a broader public announcement due to the court imposed gag order in the trial taking place at the time. An announcement regarding the final decision in Monsignor Powers' case was made at the parish this weekend. Crisis counselors were made available.

Following Archbishop Chaput's determination of unsuitability for ministry, Monsignor Powers will have no public ministry in the Archdiocese. He does have the right to appeal the decision to the Holy See. If he does not appeal, or if his appeal is unsuccessful, he could be laicized (removed from the clerical state) or live a life of prayer and penance.

Biographical Information
Monsignor Powers is 77 years old. He was ordained in 1963. He served at the following parishes and schools: Our Lady of Mercy, Philadelphia (1963-1964); Saint Patrick, Norristown (1964-1967); Catholic Foreign Mission Service in Venezuela (1967-1976); Saint Veronica, Philadelphia (1976-1980); Saint Michael, Chester (1980-1982); Saint Veronica, Philadelphia, (1982-1991); Incarnation of Our Lord, Philadelphia (1991-1996); Saint Michael the Archangel, Levittown (1996-2006); Epiphany of Our Lord, Philadelphia (2006-2010). Monsignor Powers retired in 2010 and maintained residence at Epiphany of Our Lord Parish, Philadelphia. He was placed on administrative leave in March of 2011. His administrative leave was not directly connected to the cases of priests placed on administrative leave following the February 2011 Grand Jury Report.

To Make a Report
If you would like to report a violation of The Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries, contact the Archdiocesan Office for Investigations at 1-888-930-9010.

If you would like to report an allegation of sexual abuse, contact your local law enforcement agency and/or the Office for Investigations at 1-800-930-9010.

We recognize that this public notice may be painful to victims of sexual violence. If you need support or assistance, victim services are available to you through the Victim Assistance Office of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia at 1-888-800-8780 or philavac@adphila.org.

###


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Announces Additional Resolutions Of Cases Of Priests On Administrative Leave Archbishop Chaput Makes Final Decisions In Two More Cases Of Priests Placed On Administrative Leave Following The February 2011 Grand Jury Report

April 7, 2013

THE ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA ANNOUNCES
ADDITIONAL RESOLUTIONS OF CASES OF
PRIESTS ON ADMINISTRATIVE LEAVE

Archbishop Chaput makes final decisions in two more cases of priests placed on administrative leave following the February 2011 Grand Jury Report


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced today that Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., has made final decisions in two more cases of priests placed on administrative leave following the February 2011 Grand Jury Report. Priests on administrative leave are not permitted to exercise their public ministry, administer any of the Sacraments, wear clerical garb, or present themselves publicly as priests.

Archbishop Chaput has decided that Father Joseph J. Gallagher and Father Mark S. Gaspar are unsuitable for ministry due to substantiated violations of The Standards of Ministerial Behaviors and Boundaries. They will have no public ministry in the Archdiocese. They do have the right to appeal the decision to the Holy See.
Announcements were made at the parishes where both priests last served when they were placed on administrative leave in March of 2011. Follow up announcements were made at those parishes this weekend regarding the final decisions in their cases. Crisis counselors were made available.

Father Gallagher's and Father Gaspar's cases followed the same procedure as all other cases of priests placed on administrative leave following the February 2011 Grand Jury Report. Prior to an investigation conducted by the Multi-Disciplinary Team, the case was submitted to the appropriate local district attorney's office. After being released by the district attorney, an investigation was conducted by the MDT. The results of the investigations were provided to the Archdiocesan Review Board (ARB), now known as the Professional Responsibility Review Board (PRRB) , which provided a recommendation to the Archbishop, who made the final decision. This rigorous investigative process involved more than 20 experts in child abuse.

Archbishop Chaput said, "As I've done in the past, I relied closely on the Professional Responsibility Review Board and the Multi-Disciplinary Team during this process. The counsel provided by these experts, who have devoted their careers to combatting sexual abuse, is key to this work. I'm grateful for their efforts. After reviewing all the facts, as well as recommendations from competent external authorities, I made the decisions I feel are right and just."

On May 4, 2012; July 6, 2012 and October 15, 2012 Archbishop Chaput announced resolutions in 15 of the cases of priests on administrative leave. Of the 15, eight priests were found suitable for ministry and seven priests were found unsuitable for ministry. In one additional case, the priest died before a full investigation could be conducted so it was not possible to reach a conclusion. All of those cases followed the same process of review and subsequent release by the district attorney, investigation by the MDT, review by the Archdiocesan Review Board and a final decision by the Archbishop. More information regarding those announcements is available at http://archphila.org/HHHIC/hhhic.htm.

With the decision announced today, the Archdiocese will continue the initiative entitled Honesty, Healing and Hope in Christ: Confronting Sexual Violence in Our Archdiocese, which was introduced in May 2012. Once a case is resolved the initiative begins at the parish level and consists of four phases over six months. Its purpose is to address the wide variety of reactions, thoughts and feelings that will be experienced as a result of this announcement and in the days and weeks moving forward. It identifies three primary stakeholders: the victims of the allegation or violation of The Standards of Ministerial Behaviors and Boundaries, the parishioners, who include school and Parish Religious Education Program (PREP) families, and the priests on administrative leave. Through the implementation of this initiative, the Archdiocese continues a journey of honesty, healing and hope toward the restoration of trust.

The remaining 7 administrative leave cases are not being announced today for a variety of reasons. The Archdiocese referred all of its cases to the local district attorney. Four cases have not yet been released by law enforcement so the internal Archdiocesan investigation cannot begin yet. Three cases were released by law enforcement over the past several months. Those cases are either currently under investigation, awaiting examination by the Professional Responsibility Review Board or a final decision by Archbishop Chaput. In one additional case a priest on administrative leave was arrested.

Due to the ongoing process there is no indication as to when the resolutions of the remaining cases will be made, however the Archdiocese intends to announce them as soon as possible.

As part of its efforts to bring this process to a conclusion, the MDT located, gathered and reviewed more than 400,000 pages of relevant documents, identified, located and interviewed 244 witnesses, across the United States and in several foreign countries, and conducted countless site visits to parishes and schools where incidents were alleged to have occurred. Many cases involved a search for additional evidence including yearbooks, parish records, photographs and public documents. Some cases dated as far back in time as 40 years, which posed significant investigative challenges.

To Make a Report
If you would like to report a violation of The Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries, contact the Archdiocesan Office for Investigations at 1-888-930-9010.

If you would like to report an allegation of sexual abuse, contact your local law enforcement agency and/or the Office for Investigations at 1-888-930-9010.

We recognize that this public notice may be painful to victims of sexual violence. If you need support or assistance, victim services are available to you through the Victim Assistance Office of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia at 1-888-800-8780 or philavac@adphila.org.

###


Editor's Note:
Cases of administrative leave following the Grand Jury Report: 26
Resolutions announced on May 4, 2012: 8 (one priest died prior to a full investigation) total of 9
Resolutions announced on July 6, 2012: 6
Resolution announced on October 15, 2012: 1
Priests on administrative leave who were arrested: 1
Resolutions announced today: 2
Cases remaining: 7

For additional background information please visit http://archphila.org/HHHIC/hhhic.htm.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Mass For Hope And Healing To Be Offered For Those That Have Lost A Child

April 9, 2013

MASS FOR HOPE AND HEALING
TO BE OFFERED FOR THOSE THAT HAVE LOST A CHILD


Bishop John J. McIntyre will be the celebrant at the First Annual Mass for Hope and Healing at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul. Father Bruce Lewandowski, C.Ss.R., Vicar for Cultural Ministries, will be the homilist during this Mass being celebrated for those who have lost children through abortion, miscarriage, stillbirth, illness or violence.


Friday, April 12, 2013
6:30 p.m.
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103



The Mass is being sponsored by the Archdiocesan Office for Life, Family and Laity. Following the Mass, the Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation and individual prayers for healing will be available. All are welcome to attend.


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Editor's Note: For more information contact the Office for Life, Family and Laity at 215-587-0500. No mult-box feed will be available for media. Cameras will be permitted inside the Cathedral.




Contact
Bonnie Olinger
Social Media Coordinator/Communications Assistant
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: The Boston Bombings And Their Aftermath

April 19, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
THE BOSTON BOMBINGS AND THEIR AFTERMATH


Violence and grief in the Boston area have rightly dominated our news media for the past week. The latest terrorist bloodshed is not at all senseless. It's the work of calculated malice. Innocent people, including children, have paid the price for other people's hatred. Our most important task right now is to pray for the victims and their families. God exists, and God can heal even the worst suffering, despite every human attempt to ignore him and every terrible sin that seems to "disprove" his presence. And yet it's fair to ask: How can a good God allow this kind of evil to happen?

The answer is both simple and hard. There's nothing soft-focus or saccharine about real Christianity. The Gospel of Jesus Christ is for the brave; not the complacent, and not cowards. The world and its beauty give glory to God; but we live in it with divided hearts, and so the world is also a field of conflict. God's son died on a cross and rose from the dead to deliver us from our sins. He didn't take away our freedom to choose evil. Until this world ends, some people will do vile and inhuman things to others.

The irony of human dignity is that it requires our freedom. It depends on our free will. We own our actions. And free persons can freely choose to do wicked things. Spend an hour browsing through Scripture: It's the story of a struggle between good and evil that cuts bloodily through every generation in history. And the story is made bearable, and given meaning, only by the fidelity of God - the constancy of his justice, his mercy, his solace, his love.

Within hours of the Boston bombings, public officials were telling the nation that terrorists would not be allowed to destroy "our way of life." It's the duty of leaders - an important duty - to reassure and strengthen their people in times of tragedy. Our country has a vast reservoir of goodness built up by generations of good people. America's best ideals are well worth fighting for. But we also need to remember that our way of life is as mortal as every other great power; and sooner or later, America will be a footnote in history. Only God is forever.

In the coming weeks, in the wake of the Boston tragedy, we'd do well to ponder what "our way of life" is beginning to mean. No one deserved to die in Boston. Terrorism isn't washed clean by claims of psychological instability or U.S. policy sins abroad. And no one should be eager to see in the carnage of innocent spectators God's judgment on a morally confused culture here at home.

And yet, something is wrong with our way of life, and millions of people can feel it; something selfish, cynical, empty and mean. Something that acts like a magnet to the worst impulses of the human heart. We're no longer the nation of our founders, or even of our parents. Some of their greatness has been lost.

The character of our way of life depends on the character of my way life, multiplied by the tens of millions. We shouldn't waste time being shocked or baffled by the evil in the world. It has familiar roots. It begins in the little crevices of each human heart - especially our own.

In the days ahead we need to pray for the dead and wounded in Boston, and their families. And then, with the help of God, we need to begin to change ourselves. That kind of conversion might seem like a small thing, an easy thing - until we try it. Then we understand why history turns on the witness of individual lives.

###


Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary Hosts Sold Out Concert Featuring The Three Irish Tenors

April 24, 2013

SAINT CHARLES BORROMEO SEMINARY HOSTS SOLD OUT CONCERT
FEATURING THE THREE IRISH TENORS


Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary recently hosted a sold out concert performance by the Three Irish Tenors. The fundraising event was created to further support the ongoing mission of the Seminary in forming priests for the future. Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. and Bishop Timothy Senior, Rector of the Seminary, were joined by more than 450 guests at the event, which raised approximately $250,000 for the Seminary.

These funds will enhance the many resources needed to sustain the program of priestly formation and assist the Seminary with general operating expenses, including educational technology advancements, funding for academic programs, seminarian health insurance and building maintenance.


# # #


Editor's Note: Founded in 1832, Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary has been forming young men for priestly service to the community for more than 180 years. This year, more than 130 young men have answered God's call to attend the Seminary to be formed after the heart of Jesus Christ. With the generosity of many, these young seminarians are able to successfully transform into the compassionate and loyal priests and inspiring leaders of tomorrow's Church.

For more information on Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary please visit http://www.scs.edu/.



Contact
Bonnie Olinger
Social Media Coordinator/Communications Assistant
215-587-3747

Catholic School Students For Catholic Charities Host Collection Celebration

April 25, 2013

CATHOLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS FOR CATHOLIC CHARITIES HOST COLLECTION CELEBRATION


Catholic School Students for Catholic Charities will host a collection celebration with
Auxiliary Bishop Michael J. Fitzgerald. With help from the Archbishop Carroll Cheerleaders, Band, Step Team and the school Choir, more than 150 students from schools throughout the Archdiocese will celebrate their hard work raising funds to benefit the schools of special education in the Archdiocese.

Thursday, April 25, 2013
11:00 a.m.
Archbishop Carroll High School
211 Matson Ford Road
Radnor, PA 19087-4590


Catholic School Students for Catholic Charities connects and educates students with the works of the Archdiocese, emphasizing the relationship between charity and the Catholic faith.

The money raised by Catholic School Students for Catholic Charities will support the schools of Special Education in the Archdiocese: Archbishop Ryan Academy for the Deaf, Saint Lucy Day School for Children with Visual Impairments, Saint Katherine Day School and Our Lady of Confidence Day School. Students began raising money at the start of Advent and concluded during the season of Lent. They came up with creative ways to get donations such as karaoke nights, basketball shoot-offs and arts and crafts sales.

The one elementary school and the one high school from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia that raised the most money will be recognized. Student leaders from each of these schools will be invited to an awards ceremony and breakfast at the Archdiocesan Pastoral Center, where they will later be given a tour of the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul.

The 2013 Catholic Charities Appeal, which was officially launched in February, is the single largest fundraising initiative in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Funds from the Appeal assist many programs administered by the Archdiocese, including housing and meals for the homeless, senior and family service centers, afterschool programs, community food cupboards and residential and community-based academic programs for dependent and delinquent youth, developmentally disabled and special needs children.

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Editor's Note: For more information about The Catholic Charities Appeal please contact 215-587-3651 or visit www.catholiccharitiesappeal.org.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: The Gosnell Story And Its Lessons

April 26, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
THE GOSNELL STORY AND ITS LESSONS


Some stories, no matter how unsettling, just can't be ignored - even when some people are determined to look away.

The murder trial of Philadelphia abortionist Kermit Gosnell will soon go to jury. And like every other criminally accused person under the law, Gosnell is innocent until proven guilty. Whatever the verdict though, there's no ambiguity about the kind of business he ran at his West Philadelphia "Women's Medical Center" - an abortion clinic that critics have likened to a meatpacking plant or a butcher shop, with unborn children delivered into a toilet, and jars of fetal body parts stored around the facility.

Dr. Gosnell was originally charged with one count of infanticide and five counts of "abuse of corpse" for killing fetuses born alive by plunging scissors into their necks. Without explanation, the judge in the case accepted a motion to acquit Gosnell of these charges earlier this week. Gosnell still faces four counts of first-degree and one count of third-degree murder. Eight of his coworkers have already pleaded guilty in the case, including three to third-degree murder.

Or so said The New York Times in a report dated April 23. The date is important. Gosnell's trial began March 18, more than a month ago. The Times coverage, while modest, is significant. Why? The answer is simple. The Inquirer - Philadelphia's hometown paper - has done a good job following the trial. But most prestige national media have seemed remarkably eager to ignore the story until shamed into covering it.

Gosnell is much more than a "local" story. The continuing debate over legalized abortion is a hot button national issue that drew half a million prolife demonstrators to Washington in January. The battle over abortion restrictions continues in every state. Forty years after the Supreme Court's Roe v Wade decision, resistance to permissive abortion remains high. And the vivid details of the Gosnell clinic tragedy have the kind of salacious appeal that few national media would normally avoid - if the issue were anything else. But abortion is too often, and in too many news rooms, exactly the kind of topic that brings on a sudden case of snow blindness.

The real story in the Gosnell trial is bigger than the ugly allegations against Gosnell himself; it includes the failure - the allergic disinterest - of some of our most important national media. A headline in The Atlantic magazine, April 12, states the obvious: "Why Dr. Kermit Gosnell's Trial Should Be a Front-Page Story: The dead babies. The exploited women. The racism. The numerous governmental failures. It is thoroughly newsworthy."

The Atlantic story by Conor Friedersdorf is worth reading:

http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2013/04/why-dr-kermit-gosnells-trial-should-be-a-front-page-story/274944/

But don't stop there. Read this by Kirsten Powers, columnist for The Daily Beast, in USA Today:

http://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/2013/04/10/philadelphia-abortion-clinic-horror-column/2072577/

And see these excellent analyses by journalists Terry Mattingly, Mollie Hemingway and George Conger:

http://www.patheos.com/blogs/getreligion/?s=gosnell

The irony is that much of the media's lethargy in covering the Gosnell case really doesn't surprise. It's part of the fabric of a culture that simply will not see what it doesn't want to see about the realities of abortion. And it leads to the kind of implausible claim made recently by one local commentator that "no sense of guilt is warranted" by the media because "there is no causal connection between coverage of [the Gosnell] case and bias." It's hard to imagine a more untenable alibi.

The brutality in abortion is intimate, personal and permanent. It violates women, and it kills a developing human life every time - whether the venue is a "Women's Medical Center" style meat factory or a soothing suburban clinic. What makes the Gosnell story unique is that it should distress anyone with its details, pro-choice or prolife, regardless of religion or politics.

But of course, people need to know about an evil before they can do anything about it.

###


Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput Celebrates The Bond Of Marriage Couples Married For 1, 25, 50 Years Or More Are Invited To The Wedding Anniversary Mass

April 29, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT CELEBRATES THE BOND OF MARRIAGE
Couples married for 1, 25, 50 years or more are invited to the Wedding Anniversary Mass


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will be the principal celebrant and homilist at the annual Wedding Anniversary Mass for couples who have been married for 1, 25, 50 years or more. The Wedding Anniversary Mass recalls the significance of the Sacrament of Marriage and a tribute to the family, which is the cornerstone of society.

Saturday, May 4, 2013
5:15 p.m. Mass
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Every year, hundreds of couples from the five counties of the Archdiocese gather at the Cathedral for the Wedding Anniversary Mass to pray for those who have been married. Husbands and wives are joined by their children and grandchildren, as well as additional family members to celebrate significant milestones in living the Sacrament of Marriage.

No prior registration is required. Friends and family members of married couples are encouraged to attend. All are welcome.

###


Editor's Note: For more information or questions about the Wedding Anniversary Mass, please contact the Office for Life, Family and Laity at (215)-587-0500, or e-mail famlife@adphila.org.

No mult-box feed will be available for media. Cameras will be permitted inside the Cathedral.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Over 500 Archdiocesan Students To Participate In Concert Of Excellence At The Kimmel Center

April 30, 2013

OVER 500 ARCHDIOCESAN STUDENTS TO PARTICIPATE IN
CONCERT OF EXCELLENCE AT THE KIMMEL CENTER


Over 500 music students from schools throughout the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will perform during this year's Monsignor Louis A. D'Addezio Concert of Excellence in Verizon Hall at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts.

Thursday, May 2, 2013
7:30 p.m.
Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts
Verizon Hall
300 South Broad Street
Philadelphia, PA 19102



The Concert of Excellence is sponsored by the Office of Catholic Education. The program will open with all student musicians on stage singing and playing the Star Spangled Banner. During the concert eight ensembles will present music from genres including classical, jazz and pop.

The program will feature pieces performed by students from the Archdiocesan Schools of Special Education, the All Catholic High School Concert Band, the Archdiocesan Elementary Chorus, the Archdiocesan Elementary String Orchestra, the All Catholic High School Chorus, the Archdiocesan Elementary Band, the Archdiocesan 7th and 8th Grade Chorus and the All Catholic High School Orchestra.

Many of the 17 high schools, 123 elementary schools and 4 schools of special education from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will be represented. Students from 10 private Catholic high schools are also taking part. The evening of music will conclude with a second group number, "Fill the World with Love," from the motion picture Goodbye, Mr. Chips.


# # #





Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Statement Of Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.f.m. Cap. On The Death Of Most Reverend Joseph P. Mcfadden, Bishop Of Harrisburg

May 2, 2013

Statement of Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.
On the Death of Most Reverend Joseph P. McFadden, Bishop of Harrisburg


I was shocked and deeply saddened to learn of the sudden death of Bishop Joseph McFadden of the Diocese of Harrisburg. I am grateful that I had the opportunity to be with him over the last few days at the Annual Spring Meeting of the Pennsylvania Bishops and spend time in conversation with him.

Bishop McFadden was a native Philadelphian and this diocese was always close to his heart. He served the Church in Philadelphia as a faithful priest and auxiliary bishop. His love for the priesthood was evident in everything that he did. He worked diligently to promote vocations to the priesthood and advance the mission of Catholic education. Although he served as the Bishop of Harrisburg for only a short time, he effectively embraced the call of our former Holy Father, Pope Benedict XVI, to use new forms of media to proclaim the message of the Gospel. His service in our state capital was instrumental in fostering the teachings of the Church in the public square.

As all of us here Philadelphia mourn his loss. I extend the prayerful sympathy and condolences of the entire Church of Philadelphia to his family and many friends as well as the priests, religious and all the lay faithful of the diocese of Harrisburg. May God grant him the gift of eternal life, and give peace and consolation to all those who loved, admired, and respected him. In this Easter Season may we all find hope in the Resurrection of the Lord.

# # #


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia To Host 2nd Installment Of The Year Of Faith Lecture Series Professor Helen Alvare Will Speak On Women's Freedom And Religious Freedom

May 6, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA TO HOST 2ND INSTALLMENT OF THE YEAR OF FAITH LECTURE SERIES

Professor Helen Alvare will speak on Women's freedom and religious freedom


Prominent Catholic speaker and writer, Professor Helen Alvare of the George Mason University School of Law, will be the presenter at the 2nd installment of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia's Year of Faith Lecture Series. Women's Freedom and Religious Freedom: Collaboration or Clash? is the topic of Professor Alvare's presentation.

This series features noted speakers discussing some of the most compelling topics related to the engagement of Catholic faith and identity in the modern world.

Tuesday, May 14, 2013
7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary (Vianney Hall Auditorium)
100 East Wynnewood Road
Wynnewood, PA 19096 (Montgomery County)


The Year of Faith is currently being celebrated throughout the Archdiocese of Philadelphia as the Universal Church commemorates the 50th anniversary of the opening of the Second Vatican Council.
The Year of Faith Lecture Series is sponsored by the Office for Family, Life, and Laity of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. All are welcome to attend.

# # #


Editor's Note: For more information on this lecture series please contact Meghan Cokeley,
Assistant Director, Office for Life, Family and Laity at 215-587-0500 or visit www.archphila.org/yearoffaith/onlineyoflectureseries.php.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocesan High School Students Recognized For Winning Art Contest During Dad Vail Regatta

May 10, 2013

ARCHDIOCESAN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS RECOGNIZED FOR
WINNING ART CONTEST DURING DAD VAIL REGATTA


Six Archdiocesan high school students were among those recognized by Mayor Michael A. Nutter at a press conference during the 75th Annual Aberdeen Dad Vail Regatta. The students took grand prize, first prize and honorable mentions in the 11th Annual Poster Art Contest held in conjunction with the Regatta.

Students' artwork depicted familiar and iconic scenes of rowers on the Schuylkill River during the annual Spring rowing competition. Kathy Nguyen of Archbishop Ryan High School was the Grand Prize Winner of the Poster Art Contest. In addition, five other students from Archbishop Ryan and Archbishop Wood High Schools were also selected as first prize and honorable mention winners.

The press conference in recognition of the opening of this year's Aberdeen Dad Vail Regatta and introducing the winners of the poster contest was held in the Corporate Competition Tent in Fairmont Park during the Dad Vail Regatta festivities on Friday, May 10, 2013.

# # #


Editor's Note: For electronic photos of art contest winners from Archdiocesan high schools please email the Office for Communications at communof@adphila.org.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Statement Of Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.f.m. Cap. Regarding The Verdict In The Trial Of Dr. Kermit Gosnell

May 14, 2013

STATEMENT OF ARCHBISHOP CHARLES J. CHAPUT, O.F.M. CAP.
REGARDING THE VERDICT IN THE TRIAL OF DR. KERMIT GOSNELL


The trial of Kermit Gosnell is over. His convictions will surprise very few. But nothing can bring back the innocent children he killed, or make up for the vulnerable women he exploited. We should keep the repugnance of his clinic conditions sharp in our memories, and we should remember the media's inadequacy in covering his case, because Kermit Gosnell is not an exception. Others just like him run abortion mills throughout our country.

We need to stop cloaking the ugliness of abortion with misnomers like "proper medical coverage" or "choice." It's violence of the most intimate sort, and it needs to end.

# # #


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Ordain Three Men To The Priesthood The Ordination Mass Will Be Streamed Live At www.archphila.org.

May 14, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO ORDAIN
THREE MEN TO THE PRIESTHOOD

The Ordination Mass will be streamed live at www.archphila.org.


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will ordain three men to the priesthood for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. All have completed their program of priestly formation and course of studies at Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary in Wynnewood, Montgomery County. The Rite of Ordination will take place during Mass following the Gospel..

Saturday, May 18, 2013
9:45 a.m. (Procession)
10:00 a.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Those being ordained are: Rev. Mr. Sean Loomis, Rev. Mr. John Patrick Stokely, and Rev. Mr. Thomas Viviano.

Each of the newly ordained priests will be assigned to a parish in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia where they will serve as parochial vicars. A parochial vicar is a priest appointed by the Archbishop to assist the pastor of a parish.

# # #


Editor's Note: Individual news releases on each new priest are available at www.archphila.org. Photos are also available. Please contact Jhoselyn Martinez to request photograph at Jmartinez@adphila.org.

An audio and video mult-box feed will be provided in the parking lot of the Cathedral. Please enter on 17th Street, between Race and Vine Streets. Crews will need a bnc connector and a recording deck or a live truck. Television cameras will not be permitted in the Cathedral. Reporters and still photographers will be permitted in the Cathedral but are asked to remain clear of the center aisle.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Ordain Rev. Mr. Sean Loomis To The Priesthood The Ordination Mass Will Be Streamed Live At www.archphila.org.

May 14, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO ORDAIN
REV. MR. SEAN LOOMIS TO THE PRIESTHOOD

The Ordination Mass will be streamed live at www.archphila.org.


The Rev. Mr. Sean Loomis, son of Mr. Frank and Mrs. Janice Dea Loomis, will be ordained to the priesthood by Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. on

Saturday, May 18, 2013
9:45 a.m. (Procession)
10:00 a.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Born in Stuttgart, Germany, Rev. Mr. Sean Loomis has been serving as a deacon at Saint Anselm Parish in Philadelphia. He attended Oakmont Elementary School and Haverford High School, both in Delaware County. He attended Kutztown University from 2003-2005 and received his Bachelor of Arts Degree from Franciscan University in 2007. Deacon Loomis earned both his Masters of Divinity and Theology Degrees at Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary.

Father Loomis will celebrate his Mass of Thanksgiving on
Sunday, May 19, 2013
Saint Denis Catholic Church
2401 Street Denis Lane
Havertown, PA 19083 (Delaware County)


The homilist will be Reverend Monsignor Francis Nave, pastor of Sacred Heart of Jesus Church in Bath, PA. Concelebrants include Reverend Herbert Sperger, Reverend Christopher Markellos and Reverend Justin Braun.

There are three men from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia in the Ordination Class of 2013. Each of the newly ordained priests will be assigned to an Archdiocesan parish where they will serve as parochial vicars. A parochial vicar is a priest appointed by the Archbishop to assist the pastor of a parish.

# # #


Editor's Note: If you would like to receive a photograph of Father Loomis electronically, please contact the Office for Communications at 215-587-3747 or email Jmartinez@adphila.org.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Ordain Rev. Mr. John Patrick Stokely To The Priesthood The Ordination Mass Will Be Streamed Live At www.archphila.org.

May 14, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO ORDAIN
REV. MR. JOHN PATRICK STOKELY TO THE PRIESTHOOD

The Ordination Mass will be streamed live at www.archphila.org.


The Rev. Mr. John Patrick Stokely, son of Deacon Patrick and Mrs. Joan Stokely, will be ordained to the priesthood by Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. on

Saturday, May 18, 2013
9:45 a.m. (Procession)
10:00 a.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Born in Philadelphia, Rev. Mr. John Patrick Stokely has been serving as a deacon at Saint John the Evangelist Parish in Morrisville, Bucks County. He attended Saint Aloysius Academy Elementary School in Bryn Mawr, PA, and Bishop Shanahan High School in Chester County. He received his Bachelor of Arts, Master of Divinity and Master of Arts in Pastoral Theology Degrees at Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary.

Father Stokely will celebrate his Mass of Thanksgiving on
Sunday, May 19, 2013
Saint Agnes Parish
2:00 p.m.
211 West Gay Street
West Chester, PA 19380 (Chester County)


The homilist will be Reverend Monsignor Michael Magee, Chair of The Systematic Theology Department at Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary. Concelebrants include Reverend Monsignor Joseph Prior, Reverend Alfonso Concha, Reverend Patrick Brady, and Reverend Joseph McCaughlin.

There are three men from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia in the Ordination Class of 2013. Each of the newly ordained priests will be assigned to an Archdiocesan parish where they will serve as parochial vicars. A parochial vicar is a priest appointed by the Archbishop to assist the pastor of a parish.

# # #


Editor's Note: If you would like to receive a photograph of Father Stokely electronically, please contact the Office for Communications at 215-587-3747 or email Jmartinez@adphila.org.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Ordain Rev. Mr. Thomas Viviano To The Priesthood The Ordination Mass Will Be Streamed Live At www.archphila.org.

May 14, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO ORDAIN
REV. MR. THOMAS VIVIANO TO THE PRIESTHOOD

The Ordination Mass will be streamed live at www.archphila.org.


The Rev. Mr. Thomas Viviano, son of Mr. Thomas and Mrs. Alicemary Viviano, will be ordained to the priesthood by Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. on

Saturday, May 18, 2013
9:45 a.m. (Procession)
10:00 a.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Born in Abington, (Montgomery County), Rev. Mr. Viviano has been serving as a deacon at Saint Patrick Parish in Montgomery County. He attended Saint John Bosco Elementary School and Archbishop Wood High School, both in Bucks County. He received his Bachelor of Arts Degree at DeSales University and his Masters of Divinity Degree at Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary.

Father Viviano will celebrate his Mass of Thanksgiving on
Sunday, May 19, 2013
2:00 p.m.
Saint John Bosco Catholic Church
235 East County Line Road
Hatboro, PA 19040 (Bucks County)


The homilist will be Reverend Martin Cioppi, Pastor of Mother of Divine Providence Church in King of Prussia, Montgomery County. Concelebrants include Reverend Gary Kramer, Reverend Gerald Ronan, Reverend Ronald Check, Reverend David Friel and Reverend Michael Newman, D.S.F.S.

There are three men from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia in the Ordination Class of 2013. Each of the newly ordained priests will be assigned to an Archdiocesan parish where they will serve as parochial vicars. A parochial vicar is a priest appointed by the Archbishop to assist the pastor of a parish.

# # #


Editor's Note: If you would like to receive a photograph of Father Viviano electronically, please contact the Office for Communications at 215-587-3747 or email Jmartinez@adphila.org.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Set To Launch Annual Summer Meals Programnutritional Development Services Will Again Provide Meals To Hundreds Of Thousands Of Youths In Need

May 16, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA SET TO LAUNCH ANNUAL SUMMER MEALS PROGRAM
Nutritional Development Services will again provide meals to hundreds of thousands of youths in need


Nutritional Development Services (NDS) of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will once again launch a Summer Meal Program so that children in the five-county area do not go hungry. This effort fills a gap during the summer months when meals are not provided in a school setting. As a sponsor of the Seamless Summer Option Food Service Program for Children, NDS partners with hundreds of dedicated community organizations and leaders to provide a service that contributes to the health and well-being of thousands of area children.

Summer Meals Program
June 17, 2013 to August 23, 2013


Participating sites offer children (18 years of age and under) lunch and a choice of breakfast or snack. Meals include whole grains, a variety of salads and fresh vegetables. NDS Summer Meals Programs will be available from June 17th through August 23rd of this year.

Last year, over 909,000 meals were served in 470 sites in Philadelphia and the surrounding counties. Most Philadelphia and many suburban neighborhoods qualify.

The Seamless Summer Option Food Service Program for Children is a federally-funded program operated nationally by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and administered by the Pennsylvania Department of Education.

###


Editor's Note: For more information on the Summer Meals Program including eligibility requirements and parameters for being a host site, please contact Anne H. Ayella at
215-895-3470, extension 77901 or visit www.ndsarch.org.



Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Scholarship Established In Memory Of Nutritional Development Services Founder Patrick Temple-west Saint Joseph's University Commemorates His Life-long Commitment To Nourish Children And Feed The Hungry.

May 15, 2013

SCHOLARSHIP ESTABLISHED IN MEMORY OF NUTRITIONAL DEVELOPMENT SERVICES
FOUNDER PATRICK TEMPLE-WEST

Saint Joseph's University commemorates his life-long commitment to
nourish children and feed the hungry.


Saint Joseph's University Academy of Food Marketing has established a scholarship in memory of Patrick Temple-West, Nutritional Development Services (NDS) of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia's founding director. Patrick Temple-West died at the age of 67 in August 2009.

The first scholarship will be presented to a student at a reception on

Wednesday, May 15, 2013
4:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
5:15 p.m. to 5:45 p.m. (Presentation)
Campbell Collection at the Drexel Library
Saint Joseph's University
5600 City Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19131


Patrick Temple-West was a leader in the anti-hunger movement. He was responsible for founding NDS and many other hunger assistance organizations in the region including Philabundance, Share Food Program and the former Greater Philadelphia Food Bank. While on staff at Saint Joseph's University Academy of Food Marketing, Mr. Temple-West took a leave of absence to research federal meals programs for children and founded NDS.

Nutritional Development Services' mission is to provide meals, food assistance and additional support to organizations serving children and the poor as an extension of the services and mission of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Last year, NDS served over 7 million meals through its child nutrition programs and collected the equivalent of 2 million meals through its Community Food Program.

###


Editor's Note: For more information on Nutritional Development Services' programs please contact Anne H. Ayella at 215-895-3470, extension 77901 or visit www.ndsarch.org.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: The Birthday Of The Church And The Path We Choose

May 15, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
THE BIRTHDAY OF THE CHURCH AND THE PATH WE CHOOSE


Anything without heart, anything without love -- and I mean politics, music, law, art, even religion -- anything without love, no matter how brilliant, is finally inadequate and weak. At the end of the day, the human soul yearns to be loved, and to love in return. And it won't settle for anything less.

God loves us so deeply that he sent his only son to live, suffer, die and rise again for our salvation. That's the message of Easter. The message of Pentecost - the "birthday of the Church" that we celebrate this Sunday - builds on Easter. In sending his Holy Spirit to the Apostles in the upper room, God invites each of us to join him in a passion for evangelizing the world. We are Christ's witnesses. Our mission is to respond to the fire of God's love. But desire alone won't remake the world. So how do we accomplish the work God sets before us?

First, we need to wake up, shake off the cocoon of the world's narcotic noise, and recover our clarity about right and wrong. We do this by praying, and we need to pray every day. Praying, no matter how unfocused we might be at first, clears the head and the heart. It also clears the ears, so we can hear God's quiet voice. Setting aside some silent time with God each day plants the first seed of sanity. It sends down deep roots, and the soul grows a little stronger every day. If we listen well enough and long enough, God will tell us what he wants uniquely from each of us.

Second, we need to seek out confession regularly and stay close to the Eucharist. We can't lose hope when we know we're forgiven. We can't starve to death when we're being fed with the Bread of Life. And the stronger we get in the Lord, the more we have to give to others. The sacraments are literally rivers of grace. They bring us new life. They have real power.

Third, we need to share Jesus Christ consciously with someone every day. We need to make a deliberate point of it. And we don't have to hit people over the head with the Bible to do it. Life naturally presents us with opportunities to talk about our faith with friends or colleagues. Nothing is more attractive than a sincere, personal witness to the truth. And remember that what we give away in faith, we get back a hundredfold.

Fourth, we need to show a little courage. In the same Scripture passage where Jesus tells us to go and make disciples of all nations, he also tells us that he'll be with us always, even to the end of the age. If that's so -- and of course, it is so - then what can we really worry about? What better friend can we have in the struggle for soul of the world, than the God who created it and us?

Fifth and finally, we need to be faithful to those who love us, and to those whom God calls us to love. So often we overlook the simple fabric of daily life and the persons who inhabit it. But that's where real love begins. That's where all discipleship starts. It's why Augustine wrote that "to be faithful in little things is a big thing."

God made each of us to make a difference. Whether we seem to succeed or fail is not the point. We may never see how God uses us to achieve his will. But it's enough that we try -- and then profound things can happen.

Readers my age may remember that Dag Hammarskjold was secretary general of the United Nations many years ago, during the Congo crisis in the early 1960s. He was also a Christian serious about his faith. Hammarskjold died when his plane crashed on a peace mission in Africa in September 1961. After his death, his diary was found and published under the title, Markings. This is a prayer he wrote in his diary shortly before his death:

[Oh God,]
Have mercy
Upon us.
Have mercy
Upon our efforts,
That we
Before Thee
In love and in faith
Righteousness and humility,
May follow Thee,
With self-denial, steadfastness and courage,
And meet Thee
In the silence.

Give us
A pure heart
That we may see Thee,
A humble heart
That we may hear Thee,
A heart of love
That we may serve Thee,
A heart of faith
That we may live Thee,

Thou
Whom I do not know
But Whose I am.
Thou
Whom I do not comprehend
But Who hast dedicated me
To my fate.
Thou --


We live in an era wounded by sadness and cynicism, but also ennobled by men and women of grace; people not so very different from you and me. This year, on this Pentecost, we get to choose which path to follow, because while God's Holy Spirit calls each of us by name to his service, we have the freedom to say yes or no.

If we really want to preach the Gospel, renew the Church and give glory to God in the years ahead, the only means that will work is to speak the truth in love through the witness of our lives. And it's always been so.

Lord, make us instruments of your peace -- now and always.

###


Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Office Of Catholic Education Announces Partnership Between Little Flower Catholic High School For Girls And Holy Family University

May 16, 2013

Office of Catholic Education Announces Partnership Between
Little Flower Catholic High School for Girls
and Holy Family University


Today, administrators from Little Flower Catholic High School for Girls, located in Philadelphia, were joined by officials from the Office of Catholic Education and Holy Family University to sign an agreement that enters both schools into a collaborative educational partnership. The agreement consists of three components, including admissions and scholarship, a university and dual credit agreement, and continuing education. The partnership reinforces the commitment of both schools to offer advanced educational opportunities for the personal and intellectual growth of their students and faculty.

"We are very happy to be able to announce a partnership between Holy Family University and Little Flower Catholic High School for Girls," said Doctor Carol Cary, Superintendent of Secondary Schools for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. "As with the previously announced partnership with Archbishop Ryan High School, this arrangement with Holy Family University will offer new opportunities and avenues for the young women of Little Flower Catholic High School for Girls to pursue. The faculty of Little Flower will also be able to reap the benefits of the partnership with a highly competitive local university. We are thrilled to expand our connection with Holy Family University and continue to look for opportunities to enhance the educational landscape for our students."

Students from Little Flower Catholic High School for Girls who graduate with a 2.5 GPA or higher are eligible for admission to Holy Family University with application fees waived. Little Flower students are also able to take dual-credit classes at Holy Family and earn both university credits and high school credit. Teachers, administrators, staff and employees of Little Flower Catholic High School for Girls are also able to enroll in Holy Family University undergraduate and graduate courses, as well as degree programs, with waived admission fees and opportunities for grants.

"Holy Family University continues to be committed to supporting and nurturing our local Catholic High Schools," stated University President Sister Francesca Onley, CSFN, PhD. "Through our latest partnership with Little Flower High School we look forward to offering students, faculty and staff new opportunities for educational growth through our promotion of values-based education."

Little Flower Catholic High School for Girls was founded in 1939. Rooted in the Gospel of Jesus and guided by St. Therese's spirituality of simple, loving service, Little Flower Catholic High School for Girls is committed to its mission of educating young women in a welcoming and diverse community by empowering them to recognize their God given potential, to deepen their faith, and to grow in awareness of their moral responsibilities to the global community through a comprehensive program which promotes academic excellence, integrity and generous service.

Holy Family University is a premier Catholic university of the liberal arts and professions with a main campus in Northeast Philadelphia and locations in Bensalem and Newtown, Pennsylvania. It has been recognized for providing outstanding undergraduate and graduate academic programs and professional career development in a faith-inspired, values-centered community. Founded in 1954 by the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth, Holy Family University offers purpose-driven, engaged students the knowledge, values, and skills to help them find their place and purpose in today's workplace and world.

# # #


Editor's Note: For information about Little Flower Catholic High School for Girls please visit www.littleflowerhighschool.org. For information about Holy Family University please visit www.holyfamily.edu/.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Celebrate Memorial Mass For Bishop Joseph P. Mcfadden

May 20, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO CELEBRATE MEMORIAL MASS FOR BISHOP JOSEPH P. MCFADDEN


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will be the principal celebrant for the Mass being offered for the soul of Bishop Joseph P. McFadden, Bishop of Harrisburg and former Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia. The homilist will be Reverend Monsignor Daniel J. Kutys, Moderator of the Curia.

Wednesday, May 22, 2013
7:00 p.m.
The Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


All are welcome to attend the Memorial Mass for Bishop P. McFadden being celebrated in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia on what would have been his 66th birthday.

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Editor's Note: For more information on the life and legacy of Bishop Joseph P. McFadden please visit http://www.hbgdiocese.org/category/news/


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Honors Distinguished Scholars From Catholic Secondary Schools 34th Annual Archdiocesan Academic Honors Convocation

May 21, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA HONORS DISTINGUISHED SCHOLARS
FROM CATHOLIC SECONDARY SCHOOLS

34th Annual Archdiocesan Academic Honors Convocation


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., will preach during a Liturgy of the Word before the Academic Honors Convocation at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul to honor Archdiocesan and private Catholic high school seniors for their academic excellence.

Tuesday, May 21, 2013
6:15 p.m. (procession)
6:30 p.m. (Liturgy of the Word)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103


The students, who are ranked in the top 3% of their senior class, will be honored for their academic success and dedication to their schoolwork. This year 158 students are included in this elite group according to their cumulative ranks at the end of the first semester of their senior year.

Jonathan Weyand, a student from Bishop Shanahan High School in Downingtown (Chester County) is this year's student speaker. Mr. Weyand will address those in attendance after all students have received their medals. Samuel Casey Carter, Chief Executive Officer of Faith in the Future, the independent foundation that now oversees the Office of Catholic Education and operates the 17 high schools in the Archdiocese, will offer closing remarks.

Those individuals with asterisks after their names are in the Neumann Scholars Program. Initiated in 1995, this scholarship program identifies academically talented eighth grade students through an independently administered competitive examination and provides four year scholarships to attend any Archdiocesan high school.

2013 ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA ACADEMIC SCHOLARS
Schools are categorized below according to county:

BUCKS COUNTY
Archbishop Wood High School

Adeline Schlussel
Jacklyn Emrich
Jill Snyder
Timothy J. Schisselbauer
Viktoria A. O'Donnell*
Peter S. Czerwonka
Jacquelyn M. Valori
Megan Suder

Conwell-Egan Catholic High School
Kristen Manto*
Daniel McCalley
Matthew Carroll*
Kayla Mood
Amy Gulbin

Holy Ghost Preparatory School
John H. Malin
Lawrence M. Gardner
Jeffrey J. Altmeier
Milton Padilla

CHESTER COUNTY
Academy of Notre Dame de Namur
Caroline Regina Manion
Tracey Merz
Morgan M. Sanei

Bishop Shanahan High School
Aurora N. Ireland
Danielle A. Kritz*
Jonathan M. Weyand
Kyle R. Reynolds*
Alexandra C. Brennan
Meaghan T. Dohoney
Gregory M. Elliott*
Catherine A. Ibarguen
Christina M. Goggin

Devon Preparatory School
Antonio D. Muscarella
Thomas F. Seykora
Ryan T. Shannon

Villa Maria Academy
Mary E. Shea
Cailey M. Bice
Kathryn J. Challis

DELAWARE COUNTY
Archbishop Carroll High School
Michael J. Baratta*
Aubrie M. Kletzel*
Faith K. Harrison
Regina Ann Brecker
Theodore Q. Vu*
Amanda M. Giuffrida
Stacey A. Oakes

Cardinal O'Hara High School
Alexander J. Fox*
Matthew Phillip McCalla
Grace Louise Schueren
Colleen M. Rogers
Rosemarie McLaughlin*
Charissa Ngoc Pham
Catherine E. Wroblewski
Christopher F. Pastore
Krista C. DeLone

Monsignor Bonner and Archbishop Prendergast High School
Obiajulu C. Adigwe
Sokona Diallo
Gregory N. DiDomenico
Timothy D. Ellis
Claire K. Kimilu
Catherine M. Pilling
John P. Young

MONTGOMERY COUNTY
Bishop McDevitt High School
Sophia C. DiCamillo
Steven Ferrigno*
Gabriel G. Dwyer
Kaitlyn M. Anticoli
Cecelia M. Lounsberry

Gwynedd Mercy Academy High School
Emily E. Fesnak
Monica Marandola
Isabella R. Menzies

Lansdale Catholic High School
Patrick C. Duggan*
Christine M. Nieman
Daniel N. Maloney*
Nicole Salfi*
Cole R. Sagan

LaSalle College High School
Eric W. Bridgeford
Nicholas U. D'Orazio
Robert J. Gormisky
William C. Lucas
Johnathan M. Neufeld
Ryan E. O'Donnell
Gregory C. Rogers
Robert V. Stratton

Merion Mercy Academy
Mary Kate Donahue
Mary C. Klatt
Katherine C. Riga
Marina Tsikouras

Mount Saint Joseph Academy
Kaitlyn Loftus
Jane Black
Lillian Flashner
Emily Eck

Pope John Paul II High School
Regina T. Capaldo
Alexis M. Ruber
Kerry M. Milligan
Haley J. Mesaros
Kaileigh P. DiFilippo
Keith A. Schival

Saint Basil Academy
Emily A. McCloskey
Mallory M. Tadley

PHILADELPHIA COUNTY
Archbishop Ryan High School
Stephen Michalowski
Ian Mathew Smith*
Anthony Carradorini*
Kevin Lee McNeil
Claire Tiffany Nguyen
Andrew Steven Lenherr*
Jillian M. Janowski
Danielle Taylor Petsis
Christopher Mager
Tara R. Kennedy
Amanda Michelle Peluzzo
Antonella Filipuzzi

Father Judge High School for Boys
Nicholas P. DeMarshall*
Austin G. Gwiazdowski*
Sean M. Hartman
Rosario A. Lomanno
Alexander L. Citerone*
Michael E. Benedykciuk
Lawrence J. Keys

John W. Hallahan Catholic Girls' High School
Kirsten A. Hewitt
Victoria C. Frazier
Ami M. Irvin
Tori T. Broz

Little Flower Catholic High School for Girls
Emily K. Zanker*
Megan Himes
Elizabeth V. Pierce*
Lindsey Gibbs
Natalie Midzak
Ngan Mguyen

Mercy Vocational High School
Danielle M. Friel
Michaiah S. Young

Nazareth Academy High School
Victoria C. Szafara
Michelle Ann Hillsman
Molly T. Scullion

Roman Catholic High School for Boys
Guy Joseph Campanella*
Casey Paul Howshall
Marc A. Stezzi
James Anthony Corcoran
Patrick Prendergast
Matthew S. Foster
Craig M. Diviny
Timothy M. Storino
Brendan W. White

Saint Hubert Catholic High School for Girls
Yingzhu J. Zhang
Jessica L. Conway
Nini H. Dinh
Emily T. Parker
Colleen M. Schindle

Saints John Neumann-Maria Goretti Catholic High School
Justina E. Tesauro
Christopher A. Berry
Robert Arrigo
Long Eo
Peter Pakstis

Saint Joseph's Preparatory School
James D. Finnegan
Nicholas P. Friedlander
Alexander J. Momenee
Alberto M. Pascucci
Vincent M. Pepe
Casey D. Rhode
John S. Shinn
Thomas J. Tomezsko

West Philadelphia Catholic High School
Kenny Ao
Theresa Ta


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Editor's Note: No mult-box feed will be available for media. Cameras will be permitted inside the Cathedral.

For more information on Catholic Schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia please visit http://www.catholicschools-phl.org/.


Contact
Bonnie Olinger
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput Calls For Day Of Prayer And Penance In Response To Gosnell Conviction

May 22, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT CALLS FOR DAY OF PRAYER AND PENANCE IN RESPONSE TO GOSNELL CONVICTION


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. is encouraging the clergy and faithful of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia to observe Friday, May 24, 2013 as a day of prayer and penance, in response to the trial and conviction of Philadelphia abortionist Kermit Gosnell.

Archbishop Chaput is asking that the faithful participate in this day, with others or alone, by: attending Mass and receiving Holy Communion, meditating on the Word of God, spending time in adoration of the Blessed Sacrament, praying the Sorrowful Mysteries of the Holy Rosary, reciting the Chaplet of Divine Mercy, making the Way of the Cross, or fasting and abstaining from eating meat.

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Editor's Note: For more information on the day of prayer, please visit http://archphila.org/pdfs/DayofPrayerandPenance_05-24-2013_AOPCuria.pdf


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia And Faith In The Future Foundation Announce New International Student Program

May 22, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA AND FAITH IN THE FUTURE FOUNDATION ANNOUNCE
NEW INTERNATIONAL STUDENT PROGRAM


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia, in conjunction with the Faith in the Future Foundation, will announce a partnership with Three W International to bring nearly 180 international students into three Archdiocesan High Schools over the next several years at a press conference taking place at Conwell Egan Catholic High School in Fairless Hills, Bucks County. The announcement will include Bishop Michael J. Fitzgerald, Auxiliary to the Archbishop of Philadelphia that oversees Catholic education, and representatives of the Faith in the Future Foundation, as well as the administrations from the three high schools that will be participating-Conwell Egan Catholic in Fairless Hills, Archbishop Ryan in Northeast Philadelphia, and Neumann Goretti in South Philadelphia.

Press Conference
3:00pm
Thursday, May 23, 2013
Conwell Egan Catholic High School
611 Wistar Road
Fairless Hill, PA 19030


At the press conference, officials from Three W International will discuss how three former religious housing buildings will be upgraded to serve as student dormitories to house the approximately 100 students that will be enrolled for the 2013-2014 school year. The Archdiocesan high schools currently have nearly 200 international students enrolled; these students are all housed with host families throughout the diocese.

Three W International is one of North America's largest student enrollment management companies with over 90 partner schools and 1,700 students in 18 U.S. states and 3 Canadian provinces. The three residential programs in Philadelphia will be under the direction of Lawrence Callahan, retired Superintendent of Schools of the Archdiocese of Baltimore and the Archdiocese of Washington, DC.

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Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director
215-587-3747

The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia And Faith In The Future Announce The Appointment Of Christopher Mominey As Chief Operating Officer And Secretary For Catholic Education

May 23, 2013

THE ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA AND FAITH IN THE FUTURE ANNOUNCE THE APPOINTMENT OF CHRISTOPHER MOMINEY AS CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER AND SECRETARY FOR CATHOLIC EDUCATION


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia and Faith in the Future, an independent foundation that oversees the Office of Catholic Education, today announced the appointment of Christopher Mominey as Chief Operating Officer and Secretary for Catholic Education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Mr. Mominey is a highly-respected Catholic school administrator and passionate advocate of the Church, whose appointment marks an important milestone for Catholic schools in the Archdiocese and the implementation of the Foundation's strategic vision to strengthen and grow Catholic schools across the region.

For the past 17 years, Mr. Mominey has served the Diocese of Syracuse in several roles. He began his career as Director of Campus Ministry at Christian Brothers Academy before becoming principal at Rome Catholic School. He then went on to be the Assistant Superintendent, Deputy Superintendent, and finally Superintendent of Schools for the Diocese of Syracuse. Mr. Mominey was responsible for leading a team of education professionals in the central office and across seven counties of upstate New York with oversight of technology integration, curriculum implementation, professional development, school finances, and personnel.

"It is a privilege to be appointed to serve the Archdiocese of Philadelphia in this new role as Chief Operating Officer and Secretary for Catholic Education," said Mominey. "Growth, leadership, and innovation are the key requirements of this assignment. Although the challenges here are real my career has prepared me well to make even stronger the great schools of this Archdiocese. Our guiding academic, strategic and operational principle in the years to come will always be simple: Do what is best for our students."

Mr. Mominey, the author of two books, is a member of the National Catholic Education Association, the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, and the Chief Administrators of Catholic Education. He holds a Bachelor's Degree in theology from Saint Bonaventure University and a Master's Degree in religious studies from John Carroll University as well as school district and school administrator certifications.

Bishop Michael Fitzgerald, who is responsible for Catholic Education across the entire Archdiocese, says, "Mr. Mominey has demonstrated his commitment to instructional innovation, academic excellence and Catholic values that are central to our schools-and the strongest possible future for Catholic education. We believe we have selected a candidate who best exemplifies the skill-set needed to lead the students of the Archdiocese in the 21st century."

Mr. Mominey's full-time appointment is effective July 1, and he will be relocating to Philadelphia from upstate New York. He and his wife, Stephanie, have two sons, Victor (9) and Michael (7) and two daughters, Hannah (11) and Sarah (7). During the month of June he and senior leadership from Faith in the Future will begin intensive meetings with the Office of Catholic Education as well as school administrators, teachers, pastors, and other key stakeholders.

"I believe with all of my heart that Catholic schools, parish catechetical programs, youth ministry, and Newman ministries, remain the most effective means of passing on the teachings and traditions of the Church," said Mominey. "For Catholics and non-Catholics alike our Catholic schools in particular provide the very richest setting for children to get a quality education. With this belief as my foundation, I am confident that all together, with a strong Office for Catholic Education, we will lead the Archdiocese of Philadelphia into a new and exciting era in the years to come."


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Editor's Note: For more information about Catholic schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, please visit www.catholicschools-phl.org.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Announces Parish Merger In Lower Northeast Philadelphia Resulting From Pastoral Planning Initiative

May 26, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE ANNOUNCES PARISH MERGER IN
LOWER NORTHEAST PHILADELPHIA RESULTING FROM
PASTORAL PLANNING INITIATIVE


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced today that Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has approved the recommendation of the Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee to merge parishes in the Bridesburg section of Philadelphia.

This merger is the result of ongoing restructuring that will ultimately strengthen parish communities throughout the Archdiocese positioning them for future growth and sustainability. It is hoped that the result will be revitalized parishes throughout the Archdiocese that are better equipped to meet the spiritual and pastoral needs of future generations.

The recommendations and resulting merger are an outcome of the Archdiocesan-wide Parish Pastoral Planning Area initiative, which began in 2011. Parishioners at all affected parishes learned of the final decision through letters mailed to all registered parishioners as well as announcements made at all Masses this weekend.

The merger announced today was based on a combination of factors, including, but not limited to, demographic shifts in Catholic populations, concentrated density of parishes in a limited geographic area, history of declining Mass attendance and sacramental activity, increasing economic challenges that threaten sustainability, a decrease in the availability of clergy to staff parishes, and a review of facilities.

In each instance, parishioners will attend daily and Sunday Mass at the church of the newly formed parish. The church of the former parish will remain open and be maintained as a worship site. At the discretion of the pastor, this will be utilized for weddings, funerals and feast days, as well as traditional and ethnic devotions for the time being. Sunday Mass may also be celebrated at a worship site at the discretion of the pastor and the newly formed pastoral council.

All parish property, assets and debts of the former parish will be assumed by the newly created parish, which will also be responsible for the care of all sacramental records. The pastors from the merging parishes will form a transitional team made up of lay leaders from each of the merging parishes to assist in moving forward with building the new parish community. The Archdiocese will provide ongoing guidance and support during the transition process.

The Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee, made up of lay persons, priests and Archdiocesan personnel, is examining all parishes within the Archdiocese to gauge their viability and assess whether they possess the resources to accomplish their role in the mission of the Church and remain sustainable and vibrant faith communities. Parishes within each pastoral planning area will continue to carefully and thoughtfully examine their viability in order to make future recommendations. Additional parish announcements are expected later this month and in the spring of 2014.

Parish Area Pastoral Planning is designed to be as collaborative and consultative as possible. Its goal is to provide pastors, after consulting their parish leadership, with the opportunity to dialogue with members of the Strategic Planning Committee in providing joint recommendations to the Archbishop for growth and sustainability within their respective geographic areas. Additionally, in the majority of cases, the regional bishop and the dean meet with the pastors as well as their pastoral and finance councils to hear their concerns and receive their recommendations.

The Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee shared all final proposals with the Council of Priests and the College of Consultors for their review before final approval by the Archbishop.

Parish Announcements Effective July 1, 2013:

Upper Northeast Philadelphia:
All Saints Parish (Bridesburg) and Saint John Cantius Parish (Bridesburg) will merge at the location of and keep the name of Saint John Cantius Parish. The All Saints church building will remain as a worship site for the time being.

When these mergers become effective there will be 250 parishes in the five-county Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

It is important to note that the effective date listed for these mergers is set for canonical purposes. The actual work of the transition to a new parish community is an ongoing one that will take varying lengths of time dependent upon the unique circumstances of each merger and needs of each parish. The Archdiocese will provide ongoing guidance and support to all parishes throughout the transitional process.

Earlier this year, Archbishop Chaput directed that the merger plans for the parishes listed below receive more input, broader consultation and further study.

North Philadelphia: Holy Innocents (Juniata Park/Feltonville), Mater Dolorosa (Frankford), Saint Joachim (Frankford), and Saint Joan of Arc (Richmond) began further study in February 2013. Final decisions are expected later this month.

West Philadelphia: Saint Barbara (Wynnefield) and Saint Rose of Lima (Haddington/Carroll Park) parishes began further study in February 2013. Final decisions are expected later this month.

Previous Announcements:

In January and February 2013, the Archdiocese announced parish mergers resulting from the Parish Area Pastoral Planning Initiative in North Philadelphia and West Philadelphia. Additional information regarding those mergers can be found at http://archphila.org/conversion/conversion_index.php.

Last year, the Archdiocese announced initial rounds of parish mergers resulting from the Parish Area Pastoral Planning Initiative in Coatesville and Phoenixville in Chester County as well as the Germanton, Harrowgate, and Manayunk sections of Philadelphia. Additional information regarding those mergers can also be found at http://archphila.org/conversion/conversion_index.php.

Future Announcements:

In September 2012, the following additional parishes began the Parish Area Pastoral Planning process:

Philadelphia: Holy Name of Jesus (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), Saint Agnes-Saint John Nepomucene (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), Saint Augustine (Center City East), Saint Bartholomew (Frankford), Saint Bernard (Mayfair), Saint Laurentius (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), Saint Michael (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), Saint Leo the Great (Tacony/Wissanoming), Old Saint Joseph's (Center City East), Old Saint Mary's (Center City East), Our Lady of Consolation (Tacony/Wissanoming), Saint Matthew (Mayfair), Saint Peter the Apostle (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), and Saint Timothy (Mayfair). Final decisions regarding parish mergers in these areas are expected later this month.

Delaware County: Blessed Virgin Mary (Darby), Holy Savior (Linwood), Immaculate Conception (Marcus Hook), Our Lady of Charity (Brookhaven), Saint Alice (Upper Darby), Saint Cyril of Alexandria (East Lansdowne), Saint Francis de Sales (Lenni), Saint John Fisher (Boothwyn), Saint Joseph (Aston), Saint Katharine Drexel (Chester), Saint Laurence (Upper Darby), Saint Louis (Yeadon), and Saint Philomena (Lansdowne). Final decisions regarding parish mergers in this area are expected later this month.

Last April, Archbishop Chaput directed that the merger plans for the following parishes receive more input, broader consultation and further study:

Philadelphia: Holy Cross Parish (East Mount Airy), Saint Benedict Parish (Ogontz/Belfield), Saint Madeleine Sophie Parish (West Mount Airy), and Saint Therese of the Child Jesus (West Mount Airy) Parishes will be studied further. That process began in September 2012. Final decisions are expected later this month.

Background on Philadelphia Parish Announcements Effective July 1, 2013

**A parish is always more than statistics as they do not represent the whole of parish life. They were only one part of the larger picture when developing recommendations for parish mergers. They do, however, provide a snapshot of a parish's sacramental activity and a gauge to project stability, growth or decline.**


All Saints and Saint John Cantius Parishes (Philadelphia)
All Saints Parish and Saint John Cantius Parish will merge at the location of and keep the name of Saint John Cantius Parish. The two parishes are located 0.3 miles away from each other.

The All Saints church building will remain as a worship site. The pastor of the newly formed parish will be appointed with the regular priest personnel announcements later this month.

As a result of the merger, the newly formed parish is projected to have over 4,900 registered parishioners and approximately 900 regular attendees at Sunday Mass.

All Saints Parish:       
Year 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 37 41
Marriages 18 7
Weekend Mass attendance 344 245

Saint John Cantius Parish:       
Year 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 29 37
Marriages 11 17
Weekend Mass attendance 600 635

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Editor’s Note: The Archdiocese of Philadelphia is comprised of 44 Pastoral Planning Areas (PPAs). It is expected that the remainder of the first 22 PPAs will complete the work of planning and implementation over the next 15 months. An additional two years will be required for the remainder of the PPAs. For more information on the Parish Area Pastoral Planning, please visit http://archphila.org/conversion/conversion_index.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Religious Freedom And The Need To Wake Up

May 24, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
RELIGIOUS FREEDOM AND THE NEED TO WAKE UP


"IRS officials have, of course, confessed that they inappropriately targeted conservative groups -- especially those with 'tea party' or 'patriot' in their names -- for extra scrutiny when they sought non-profit status. Allegations of abuse or harassment have since broadened to include groups conducting grassroots projects to 'make America a better place to live,' to promote classes about the U.S. Constitution or to raise support for Israel.

"However, it now appears the IRS also challenged some individuals and religious groups that, while defending key elements of their faith traditions, have criticized projects dear to the current White House, such as health-care reform, abortion rights and same-sex marriage."
Terry Mattingly, director, Washington Journalism Center; weekly column, May 22


Let's begin this week with a simple statement of fact. America's Catholic bishops started pressing for adequate health-care coverage for all of our nation's people decades before the current administration took office. In the Christian tradition, basic medical care is a matter of social justice and human dignity. Even now, even with the financial and structural flaws that critics believe undermine the 2010 Affordable Care Act, the bishops continue to share the goal of real health-care reform and affordable medical care for all Americans.

But health care has now morphed into a religious liberty issue provoked entirely - and needlessly -- by the current White House. Despite a few small concessions under pressure, the administration refuses to withdraw or reasonably modify a Health and Human Services (HHS) contraceptive mandate that violates the moral and religious convictions of many individuals, private employers and religiously affiliated and inspired organizations.

Coupled with the White House's refusal to uphold the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act, and its astonishing disregard for the unique nature of religious freedom displayed by its arguments in a 9-0 defeat in the 2012 Hosanna-Tabor Supreme Court decision, the HHS mandate can only be understood as a form of coercion. Access to inexpensive contraception is a problem nowhere in the United States. The mandate is thus an ideological statement; the imposition of a preferential option for infertility. And if millions of Americans disagree with it on principle - too bad.

The fraud at the heart of our nation's "reproductive rights" vocabulary runs very deep and very high. In his April 26 remarks to the Planned Parenthood Federation of America, the president never once used the word "abortion," despite the ongoing Kermit Gosnell trial in Philadelphia and despite Planned Parenthood's massive role in the abortion industry.

Likewise, as Anthony Esolen recently noted so well, NARAL Pro-Choice America's public statement on the conviction of abortionist Gosnell was a masterpiece of corrupt and misleading language. Gosnell was found guilty of murdering three infants, but no such mention was made anywhere in the NARAL Pro-Choice America statement.

None of this is finally surprising. Christians concerned for the rights of unborn children, as well as for their mothers, have dealt with bias in the media and dishonesty from the nation's abortion syndicate for 40 years. But there's a special lesson in our current situation. Anyone who thinks that our country's neuralgic sexuality issues can somehow be worked out respectfully in the public square in the years ahead, without a parallel and vigorous defense of religious freedom, had better think again.

As Mollie Hemingway, Stephen Krason and Wayne Laugesen have all pointed out, the current IRS scandal - involving IRS targeting of "conservative" organizations - also has a religious dimension. Selective IRS pressure on religious individuals and organizations has drawn very little media attention. Nor should we expect any, any time soon, for reasons Hemingway outlines for the Intercollegiate Review. But the latest IRS ugliness is a hint of the treatment disfavored religious groups may face in the future, if we sleep through the national discussion of religious liberty now.

The day when Americans could take the Founders' understanding of religious freedom as a given is over. We need to wake up.

American Catholics are called to observe a second annual "Fortnight for Freedom" this June 21-July 4. For more information, see the website of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Announcement Regarding Reverend James J. Collins

May 26, 2013

ANNOUNCEMENT REGARDING REVEREND JAMES J. COLLINS


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has placed Reverend James J. Collins on administrative leave following an allegation that he sexually abused a minor over forty years ago. No other allegation of this nature has been received against him. While on administrative leave he is not permitted to exercise his public ministry pending the outcome of the investigation. His leave is not connected to the cases of priests placed on administrative leave following the February 2011 Grand Jury Report.

Consistent with the Archdiocesan Policy for the Protection of Children and Young People promulgated in October of 2012, the allegation was received and immediately reported to law enforcement. The information was also reviewed by the Office of Investigations, the Office for Child and Youth Protection and the Office of the Vicar for Clergy. Those offices provided a joint recommendation to the Archbishop, who decided to place Father Collins on administrative leave pending any possible action by law enforcement and a full internal investigation. In keeping with standing Archdiocesan policy, that internal investigation will not proceed until after the allegation is reviewed by the district attorney's office.

An announcement regarding Father Collins was made this weekend at Saint Martha Parish in Philadelphia, where he had been residing, and crisis counselors were made available. Although he was in residence there, he had no formal duties at the parish, did not assist at Masses or make visits to the school. The Archdiocese also communicated information about this allegation to Holy Family University where Father Collins had been a faculty member since 1976. He retired from that position earlier this year.

Biographical Information
Father Collins is 74 years old. He was ordained in 1964. He served at the following parishes, schools and offices: Saint John the Evangelist, Philadelphia (1964); Roman Catholic High School for Boys (1964-1965); Saint Paul, Philadelphia (1964-1965); Office of the Metropolitan Tribunal (1964-1965); Our Lady of Pompeii, Philadelphia (1965); Student Priest at the Pontifical North American College, Rome (1965-1968); Saint Stephen, Philadelphia (1966); Cardinal Dougherty High School, Philadelphia (1968-1969); Immaculate Conception, Philadelphia (1968-1975); Roman Catholic High School for Boys, Philadelphia (1969-1976); Saint Paul, Philadelphia (1975-1976); Saint Christopher, Philadelphia (1976); Holy Family University (1976-2013); placed on administrative leave (2013).

To Make a Report
To report an allegation of sexual abuse, contact your local law enforcement agency and the Office for Investigations at 1-888-930-9010.

To report a violation of The Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries, contact the Archdiocesan Office for Investigations at 1-888-930-9010.

We recognize that this public notice may be painful to victims of sexual violence. If you need support or assistance, victim services and referrals are available to you through the Victim Assistance Office of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia at 1-888-800-8780 or philavac@adphila.org.

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Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Bishop Shanahan High School And Widener University Launch Innovative Academic Partnership

May 28, 2013

BISHOP SHANAHAN HIGH SCHOOL AND WIDENER UNIVERSITY
LAUNCH INNOVATIVE ACADEMIC PARTNERSHIP


Bishop Shanahan High School and Widener University's School of Engineering have created a first-of- its-kind partnership that will allow high school students to take selected college entry-level engineering courses at Bishop Shanahan, beginning this September.

Dr. James T. Harris, Widener University President, and Dr. Fred A. Akl, Widener University Dean of Engineering School, will be joined by Dr. Carol A. Cary, Archdiocesan Superintendent of Secondary Schools, as well as Sr. Regina Plunkett, Bishop Shanahan's President and Sr. Maureen McDermott, Bishop Shanahan's Principal, for a formal signing ceremony on the Widener campus.

Signing Ceremony
2:30pm
Wednesday, May 29, 2013
Widener University, Old Main Building
One University Place
Chester, PA 19013


At the signing, President Harris, Dr. Cary and Sr. Regina will provide remarks about the unique partnership and its benefits for students and their families at Bishop Shanahan and Widener University. Students from Widener University and Shanahan will also be available for interviews following the signing.

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Editor's Note: Offering rigorous academics, and diverse classroom and field experiences, Widener's Engineering students are encouraged and trained to use their minds creatively, as they learn the fundamentals of engineering in small class sizes with close interaction with professors. Widener boasts student internship placement with reputable companies, such as Air Products, Boeing, Disney, Dupont, Exelon, Naval Surface Warfare Center, PennDOT and SIEMENS.


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Ordain Fifteen Men To The Permanent Diaconate

May 28, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO ORDAIN FIFTEEN MEN TO
THE PERMANENT DIACONATE


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will ordain fifteen men to the Permanent Diaconate for service in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. The Rite of Ordination will take place during Mass following the Gospel.

Saturday, June 1, 2013
9:45 a.m. (Procession)
10:00 a.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Permanent deacons are members of the clergy of the Catholic Church. They may be single or married. As ministers of God's Word, permanent deacons preach and teach. They baptize, may witness marriages, carry out the funeral rites at the Vigil and the grave, and administer Holy Communion to the sick and dying.

Those being ordained include:

R. Lyle Benner is a member of Saint Agnes Parish in Sellersville, Bucks County, where he resides with his wife Donna. They have three children, Aaron, Elliott and Anna. Mr. Benner holds a Bachelor of Arts Degree in Economics from Millersville University. He is President of TBW Industries, Inc.

Daniel Bingnear is a member of Holy Savior Parish in Linwood, Delaware County, where he resides with his wife Barbara. They have two children, Claire and Adam. Mr. Bingnear holds a Bachelor of Science Degree from Neumann University. He is an Environmental Engineer at the Boeing Company.

William C. Bradley is a member of Saint Raymond of Penafort Parish in Philadelphia, where he resides with his wife Cynthia. They have two children, Christopher and Gina. Mr. Bradley holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Accounting/OPS Management from LaSalle University. He is Director of the Office for Black Catholics for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

Anthony J. Cincotta is a member of Saint Thomas the Apostle Parish in Glen Mills, Delaware County, where he resides with his wife Eileen. They have two daughters, Susan Harper and Jennifer. Mr. Cincotta holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Criminal Justice/History from the University of Maryland. He is a retired police officer with the Montgomery County Department of Police in Rockville, Maryland.

Donald P. Dicarlo, Jr. is a member of Saint Thomas of Villanova Parish in Villanova, Delaware County, where he resides with his wife Denise and their three children, Justin, Erica, and Tori.
Mr. Dicarlo earned his undergraduate degree from Villanova University and holds advanced degrees in both law and theology. He is a managing director and senior wealth strategist for Wilmington Trust Company (M&T Bank).

James J. Elliott is a member of Saint Patrick Parish in Kennett Square, Chester County, where he resides with his wife Marie. They have three sons, James, Michael and Steven. Mr. Elliott holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Engineering and an MBA from the University of Delaware. He is a Security Specialist at Anixter, Inc. in Media, Pennsylvania.

Matthew J. Hrobak is a member of Saint Titus Parish in Norristown, Montgomery County, where he resides with his wife Carol. They have four daughters, Debra, Jennie, Carol and Jacqueline. Mr. Hrobak graduated from Roxborough High School in Philadelphia. He is an Investigator with the Philadelphia Housing Authority at the Office of Audits and Compliance.

Patrick J. Kelly is a member of Saint Joseph Parish in Collingdale, Delaware County, where he resides with his wife Sandra. They have two children, Kayla and Brianna. Mr. Kelly is a graduate of Monsignor Bonner High School in Drexel Hill and is employed as a Union Laborer by JPC Group.

Ronald F. Kelley is a member of Our Lady of Perpetual Help Parish in Morton, Delaware County, where he resides with his wife Julie. They have six children, Rebecca, Aaron, Sarah, Michael, Thomas and Matthew. Mr. Kelly graduated from Saint Joseph's University with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Administration. He is a retired Senior Management Analyst for the Internal Revenue Service.

Louis Libbi is a member of Saints Peter and Paul Parish in West Chester, Chester County, where he resides with his wife Nancy. They have one son, Nicholas. Mr. Libbi holds a Bachelor of Science Degree from Pennsylvania State University. He is employed as an Operations Manager for U.S. Municipal.

Donald O. Nichols is a member of Saint Mary Parish in Schwenksville, Montgomery County. He resides with his wife Linda in Harleysville. They have three sons, Andrew, Peter and Jacob. Mr. Nichols holds a Bachelor's Degree in Accounting from the former Glassboro State College (now Rowan University). He is employed as a Controller by M&C Specialties Company.

Louis Quaglia is a member of Saint Charles Borromeo Parish in Bensalem, Bucks County, where he resides with his wife Marian. They have four children, Michele Donnelly, Danielle, Michael and Christopher. Mr. Quaglia holds a Bachelor of Science Degree in Chemistry from St. Peter's University. He is employed as a Purchasing Supervisor at Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc. in Bordentown, New Jersey.

John J. Rodgers is a member of Saint Colman Parish in Ardmore, Montgomery County, where he resides with his wife Vicky. They have five sons, Joel, Jeffrey, Stephen, Daniel and Timothy.
Mr. Rodgers holds a Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts (Religious Education) degrees from Villanova University and is employed as a teacher at Monsignor Bonner Archbishop Prendergast Catholic High School in Drexel Hill, Pennsylvania.

Raymond N. Scipioni is a member of Saint Charles Borromeo Parish in Bensalem, Bucks County, where he resides with his wife Linda. They have three daughters, Lori, Carolyn and Isabelle. Raymond holds an MBA in Management Information Systems from LaSalle University. He is employed as a Business Development Manager at Avalon Integration.

William V. Williams is a member of Sacred Heart Parish in Havertown, Delaware County, where he resides with his wife Lorraine. They have three children, Ronald, Christina and Jonathan. William holds Bachelor of Science degrees in Chemistry and Biotechnology from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Doctor of Medicine degree from Tufts University. He is employed as a research physician at Incyte Corporation.

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Editor's Note: For more information on the Permanent Deacons please contact Deacon James Owens at (610) 586-8535.

An audio and video mult-box will be provided in the parking lot of the Cathedral. Please enter the lot on 17th Street, between Race and Vine Streets. Crews will need a bnc connector and a recording deck or a live truck. Television cameras will not be permitted in the Cathedral. Reporters and still photographers will be permitted in the Cathedral but are asked to remain clear of the center aisle.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocesan High Schools Graduate The Class Of 2013

May 30, 2013

ARCHDIOCESAN HIGH SCHOOLS GRADUATE
THE CLASS OF 2013


Baccalaureate and Commencement Ceremonies scheduled throughout the five counties
of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia's seventeen high schools are proud to announce the baccalaureate and commencement schedules for the Class of 2013. Catholic schools are committed to academic excellence as well as fostering the intellectual development and growth of students within the context of a 21st century learning landscape.

The 2013 Archdiocesan high school baccalaureate and commencement schedule follows.

Archbishop John Carroll High School

Baccalaureate Mass: Wednesday, June 5, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: Saint Pius X Church; 220 Lawrence Road; Broomall, PA 19008 (Delaware County)

Commencement Exercises: Thursday, June 6, 2013 at 11:00 a.m.
Location: Cabrini College; 610 King of Prussia Road; Radnor, PA 19087 (Delaware County)
Presiding: Bishop Daniel Thomas

Archbishop Ryan High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Monday, June 3, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul; 18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway; Philadelphia, PA 19103

Commencement Exercises: Monday, June 3, 2013 at 11:00 a.m.
Location: The Liacouras Center; Temple University; 1776 North Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19121
Presiding: Bishop Michael Fitzgerald

Archbishop Wood High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Friday, May 31, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: Archbishop Wood High School Auditorium; 655 York Road; Warminster, PA 18974 (Bucks County)

Commencement Exercises: Monday, June 3, 2013 at 11:00 a.m.
Location: Villanova Pavilion; Villanova University; 800 East Lancaster Avenue; Villanova, PA 19085 (Delaware County)
Presiding: Bishop Timothy Senior

Bishop McDevitt High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Monday, June 3, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul; 18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway; Philadelphia, PA 19103

Commencement Exercises: Wednesday, June 5, 2013 at 9:00 a.m.
Location: Kuch Center; Arcadia University; 450 South Easton Road; Glenside, PA 19038 (Montgomery County)
Presiding: Bishop Timothy Senior

Bishop Shanahan High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Wednesday, June 5, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: Saint Elizabeth Church; Fellowship Road and Route 100; Uwchlan, PA 19480 (Chester County)

Commencement Exercises: Friday, June 7, 2013 at 10:00 a.m.
Location: Bishop Shanahan High School Auditorium; 220 Woodbine Road; Downingtown, PA 19335 (Chester County)
Presiding: Bishop Timothy Senior

Cardinal O'Hara High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Tuesday, June 4, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul; 18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway; Philadelphia, PA 19103

Commencement Exercises: Wednesday, June 5, 2013 at 2:00 p.m.
Location: Villanova Pavilion; Villanova University; 800 East Lancaster Avenue; Villanova, PA 19085 (Delaware County)
Presiding: Bishop Daniel Thomas

Conwell-Egan Catholic High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Monday, June 3, 2013 at 6:00 p.m.
Location: Saint Michael the Archangel Church; 66 Levittown Parkway; Levittown, PA 19054 (Bucks County)

Commencement Exercises: Tuesday, June 4, 2013 at 10:30 a.m.
Location: Holy Family University, 9801 Frankford Avenue, Philadelphia, PA 19114
Presiding: Bishop Michael Fitzgerald

Father Judge High School for Boys
Baccalaureate Mass: Tuesday, June 4, 2013 at 6:00 p.m.
Location: Resurrection of Our Lord Church; Castor Avenue and Vista Street; Philadelphia, PA 19149

Commencement Exercises: Wednesday, June 5, 2013 at 11:00 a.m.
Location: Liacouras Center; Temple University; 1776 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19121
Presiding: Bishop John McIntyre

John W. Hallahan Catholic Girls' High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Monday, June 3, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. Commencement to immediately follow
Location: Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul; 18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway; Philadelphia, PA 19103
Presiding at Commencement Exercises: Bishop Daniel Thomas

Saint Hubert Catholic High School for Girls
Baccalaureate Mass: Wednesday, June 5, 2013 at 9:00 a.m.
Location: Our Lady of Ransom Church; Roosevelt Boulevard and Unruh Street; Philadelphia, PA 19149

Commencement Exercises: Wednesday, June 5, 2013 at 5:00 p.m.
Location: Holy Family University; 9801 Frankford Avenue; Philadelphia, PA 19114
Presiding: Bishop John McIntyre

Lansdale Catholic High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Monday, June 3, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: Saint Stanislaus Church; 51 Lansdale Avenue; Lansdale, PA 19446 (Montgomery County)

Commencement Exercises: Tuesday, June 4, 2013 at 10:00 a.m.
Location: National Shrine of Our Lady of Czestochowa; Ferry Road; Doylestown, PA18901 (Montgomery County)
Presiding: Bishop Robert Maginnis

Little Flower Catholic High Schools for Girls
Baccalaureate Mass: Thursday, June 6, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul; 18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway; Philadelphia, PA 19103

Commencement Exercises: Friday, June 7, 2013 at 2:00 p.m.
Location: Holy Family University; 9801 Frankford Avenue; Philadelphia, PA 19114
Presiding: Bishop John McIntyre

Monsignor Bonner and Archbishop Prendergast Catholic High School
Archbishop Prendergast Division
Baccalaureate Mass: Wednesday, June 5, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: Holy Cross Church; Bishop and Springfield Roads; Springfield, PA 19064 (Delaware County)

Commencement Exercises: Friday, June 7, 2013 at 10:00 a.m.
Location: Villanova Pavilion; Villanova University; 800 East Lancaster Avenue; Villanova, PA 19085 (Delaware County)
Presiding: Dr. Carol Cary

Monsignor Bonner and Archbishop Prendergast Catholic High School
Monsignor Bonner Division
Baccalaureate Mass: Thursday, June 6, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: Holy Cross Church; Bishop and Springfield Roads; Springfield, PA 19064 (Delaware County)

Commencement Exercises: Friday, June 7, 2013 at 10:00 a.m.
Location: Villanova Pavilion; Villanova University; 800 East Lancaster Avenue; Villanova, PA 19085 (Delaware County)
Presiding: Dr. Carol Cary

Saints John Neumann and Maria Goretti Catholic High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Thursday, June 6, 2013 at 3:00 p.m.
Location: Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul; 18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway; Philadelphia, PA 19103

Commencement Exercises: Friday, June 7, 2013 at 9:00 a.m.
Location: Temple Performing Arts Center; Temple University; 1837 North Broad Street; Philadelphia, PA 19122
Presiding: Bishop Michael Fitzgerald

Pope John Paul II High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Tuesday, June 4, 2013 at 6:30 p.m.
Location: Pope John Paul II High School Auditorium; 181 Rittenhouse Road; Royersford, PA 19468 (Montgomery County)

Commencement Exercises: Wednesday, June 5, 2013 at 10:30 a.m.
Location: Pope John Paul II High School Auditorium; 181 Rittenhouse Road; Royersford, PA 19468 (Montgomery County)
Presiding: Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.

Roman Catholic High School for Boys
Baccalaureate Mass: Friday, June 7, 2013 at 6:30 p.m. Commencement to immediately follow
Location: Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul; 18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway; Philadelphia, PA 19103
Presiding at Commencement Exercises: Dr. Carol Cary

West Philadelphia Catholic High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Thursday, May 30, 2013 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: Divine Mercy Church; 67th Street and Chester Avenue; Philadelphia, PA 19142

Commencement Exercises: Monday, June 3, 2013 at 10:30 a.m.
Location: West Philadelphia Catholic High School Auditorium; 4501 Chestnut Street; Philadelphia, PA 19139
Presiding: Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.



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Contact
Bonnie Olinger
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Papal Honors Bestowed Upon Dr. Richard Mccarron And Donna Farrell During The Final Days Of Pope Benedict Xvi's Pontificate Two Former Archdiocesan Staff Members Were Recognized For Service To The Church

May 30, 2013

PAPAL HONORS BESTOWED UPON
DR. RICHARD MCCARRON AND DONNA FARRELL

During the Final Days of Pope Benedict XVI's Pontificate
Two Former Archdiocesan Staff Members Were Recognized for Service to the Church


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has announced that Dr. Richard McCarron, former Secretary of Catholic Education for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, has been named a Knight Commander in the Order of Saint Gregory the Great. He also announced that Donna Farrell, former Director of Communications for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, has received the Cross Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice ("Cross for the Church and Pontiff").

The honors were bestowed by Pope Benedicxt XVI in the closing days of his Pontificate and will be presented by Archbishop Chaput this Sunday.

Sunday, June 2, 2013
6:30 p.m. (Mass)
Presentation of Papal Honors (immediately following)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Pope John Paul II previously appointed Dr. McCarron to the Order of Saint Gregory the Great in 1998. He served as the Secretary of Catholic Education for 12 years, overseeing 17 Archdiocesan high schools, four schools of special education, and more than 160 parish elementary schools. He also managed curriculum, religious education programs, youth groups and the Newman Apostolate on behalf of the Archdiocese. His service in that role closed a career in Catholic education that spanned more than 40 years.

The rank of Knight Commander in the Order of Saint Gregory the Great is one of the highest honors the Holy Father can bestow on an individual. The Order of Saint Gregory the Great, one of the five pontifical knightly orders, was founded by Pope Gregory XVI in 1831 to honor his great sixth century predecessor. In the nearly 200 years since, the Holy Father has awarded it to diplomats, artists, scientists, world leaders and interfaith leaders from all walks of life who have shown, by their service, extraordinary love for Jesus Christ and his Church. Membership signifies recognition from the Holy Father himself for service already rendered and an invitation from His Holiness to continue a life of exemplary Christian witness.

Donna Farrell, the first layperson in the Archdiocese to receive the Cross Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice since 2003, is currently the Manager of External Affairs for Independence Blue Cross. Her dedication to the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and the Catholic faith was consistently evident through her efforts to highlight the good works of the local Church and promote Catholic values and teachings. She devoted countless hours to managing internal communications and media relations surrounding many of the largest challenges the Archdiocese has faced in its history. She began her service to the Archdiocese in 1998 and served as the Director of Communications from 2005-2012.

The Cross Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice, also known as the Cross of Honor, comes directly from the Holy See and is composed of a gold medal with the name of the honor inscribed, as well as a scroll. The honor was established in 1888 and is given to Catholics who have shown distinguished service to the Church and to the Papal office.

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Editor's Note: No mult-box feed will be available for media. Cameras will be permitted inside the Cathedral.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Announces Participation In The "Spiritual Motherhood/pray For My Priest" Program

May 31, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA ANNOUNCES PARTICIPATION IN
THE "SPIRITUAL MOTHERHOOD/PRAY FOR MY PRIEST" PROGRAM


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia will participate in the ministry of Spiritual Motherhood and Adoration Cenacles, a program begun by the apostolate Pray For My Priest. It seeks to organize faithful Roman Catholic women to put the spiritual care of all priests in the Archdiocese at the forefront of their prayer life and good works.

Its goal is to match each priest anonymously with a "Spiritual Mother", a woman of prayer, who will raise her "priest son" up to God unceasingly in prayer and sacrifice so that he may best fulfill his vocation to serve God and His people.

Additionally, Adoration Cenacles for Priests will invite the faithful to come together in prayer for one hour in front of the Holy Eucharist specifically for the sanctification and fortification of priests.

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Editor's Note: For more information or to spiritually adopt a priest, please visit www.stmariagoretti.net/smgyouthgroup.html. Additional information is also available at www.prayformypriest.org.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Announces Parish Mergers In Philadelphia And Delaware County Resulting From Pastoral Planning Initiative

June 2, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE ANNOUNCES PARISH MERGERS IN
PHILADELPHIA AND DELAWARE COUNTY
RESULTING FROM PASTORAL PLANNING INITIATIVE


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced today that Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has reviewed recommendations of the Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee and made decisions to merge parishes in Philadelphia and Delaware County.

These mergers are the result of ongoing restructuring that will ultimately strengthen parish communities throughout the Archdiocese positioning them for future growth and sustainability. It is hoped that the result will be revitalized parishes throughout the Archdiocese that are better equipped to meet the spiritual and pastoral needs of future generations.

The recommendations and resulting mergers are an outcome of the Archdiocesan-wide Parish Pastoral Planning Area initiative, which began in 2011. Parishioners at all affected parishes learned of the final decisions through letters mailed to all registered parishioners as well as announcements made at all Masses this weekend.

The mergers announced today were based on a combination of factors, including, but not limited to, demographic shifts in Catholic populations, concentrated density of parishes in a limited geographic area, history of declining Mass attendance and sacramental activity, increasing economic challenges that threaten sustainability, a decrease in the availability of clergy to staff parishes and a review of facilities.

In each instance of a merger, parishioners will attend daily and Sunday Mass at the church of the newly formed parish. The church of the former parish will remain open and be maintained as a worship site. At the discretion of the pastor, this site will be utilized for weddings, funerals and feast days, as well as traditional and ethnic devotions for the time being. Sunday Mass may also be celebrated at a worship site at the discretion of the pastor and the newly formed pastoral council.

Additionally, all parish property, assets and debts of the former parish will be assumed by the newly created parish, which will also be responsible for the care of all sacramental records. The pastors from the merging parishes will form a transitional team made up of lay leaders from each of the merging parishes to assist in moving forward with building the new parish community. The Archdiocese will provide ongoing guidance and support during the transition process.

The Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee, made up of lay persons, priests and Archdiocesan personnel, is examining all parishes within the Archdiocese to gauge their viability and assess whether they possess the resources to accomplish their role in the mission of the Church while remaining sustainable and vibrant faith communities. Parishes within each pastoral planning area will continue to carefully and thoughtfully examine their viability in order to make future recommendations. Additional parishes are expected to begin the process of study in the Fall of 2013.

Parish Area Pastoral Planning is designed to be as collaborative and consultative as possible. Its goal is to provide pastors, after consulting their parish leadership, with the opportunity to dialogue with members of the Strategic Planning Committee in providing joint recommendations to the Archbishop for growth and sustainability within their respective geographic areas. Additionally, in the majority of cases, the regional bishop and the dean meet with the pastors as well as their pastoral and finance councils to hear their concerns and receive their recommendations.

The Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee shares all final proposals with the Council of Priests and the College of Consultors for their review before final approval by the Archbishop.

When the mergers detailed below become effective there will be 236 parishes in the five-county Archdiocese of Philadelphia. The pastors assigned to all of the newly formed parishes resulting from this round of mergers were announced this week with the regular priest personnel assignments. A complete list of those assignments can be found at www.CatholicPhilly.com.

*It is important to note that the effective date listed for these mergers is set for Canonical (Church law) purposes. The actual work of the transition to a new parish community is an ongoing one that will take varying lengths of time dependent upon the unique circumstances of each merger and needs of each parish. The Archdiocese will provide ongoing guidance and support to all parishes throughout the transitional process.*

*The statistics presented below do not represent the whole of parish life. They were only one part of the larger picture when developing recommendations for parish mergers. They do, however, provide a snapshot of a parish's sacramental activity and a gauge to project stability, growth or decline.*


Delaware County Parish Announcements Effective July 1, 2013:


Eastern Delaware County:

Saint Laurence and Saint Alice Parishes
Saint Laurence (Upper Darby) and Saint Alice (Upper Darby) Parishes will merge at the location and keep the name of Saint Laurence Parish. The two parishes are located 1.5 miles from each other. The Saint Alice church building will still be maintained as a worship site for the time being.

As a result of the merger, the newly formed parish is projected to have over 6,000 registered parishioners and approximately 2,000 regular attendees at Sunday Mass.
Saint Laurence Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 46 36
Marriages 20 18
Weekend Mass attendance 1157 1110

Saint Alice Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 45 34
Marriages 10 15
Weekend Mass attendance 1016 923


Saint Philomena and Saint Cyril of Alexandria Parishes
Saint Philomena (Lansdowne) and Saint Cyril of Alexandria (East Lansdowne) Parishes will merge at the location and keep the name of Saint Philomena Parish. The two parishes are located .86 miles from each other. The Saint Cyril of Alexandria church building will still be maintained as a worship site for the time being.

As a result of the merger, the newly formed parish is projected to have over 4,000 registered parishioners and approximately 650 regular attendees at Sunday Mass.
Saint Philomena Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 13 7
Marriages 8 6
Weekend Mass attendance 471 379

Saint Cyril of Alexandria Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 27 33
Marriages 16 14
Weekend Mass attendance 378 275


Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint Louis Parishes
Blessed Virgin Mary (Darby) and Saint Louis (Yeadon) Parishes will merge at the location and keep the name of Blessed Virgin Mary Parish. The two parishes are located 1.5 miles from each other. The Saint Louis church building will still be maintained as a worship site for the time being.

As a result of the merger, the newly formed parish is projected to have over 2,500 registered parishioners and approximately 500 regular attendees at Sunday Mass.
Blessed Virgin Mary Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 8 12
Marriages 10 8
Weekend Mass attendance 438 395

Saint Louis Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 5 3
Marriages 5 3
Weekend Mass attendance 295 152


Western Delaware County:

Saint John Fisher, Holy Saviour and Immaculate Conception Parishes
Saint John Fisher (Boothwyn), Holy Saviour (Linwood) and Immaculate Conception (Marcus Hook) Parishes will merge at the location and keep the name of Saint John Fisher Parish. Saint John Fisher is located 2.88 miles from the other two churches. For the time being, the Holy Saviour and Immaculate Conception church buildings will still be maintained as worship sites.

As a result of the merger, the newly formed parish is projected to have over 9,000 registered parishioners and approximately 1,500 regular attendees at Sunday Mass.
Saint John Fisher Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 57 49
Marriages 12 5
Weekend Mass attendance 750 780

Holy Saviour Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 43 21
Marriages 11 10
Weekend Mass attendance 570 497

Immaculate Conception Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 7 9
Marriages 4 7
Weekend Mass attendance 430 311

Free Standing Parishes:


As a result of the Pastoral Planning Area initiative it has been determined that the following will remain free standing parishes at this time:

Saint Joseph (Aston), Saint Francis de Sales (Lenni), Our Lady of Charity (Brookhaven) and Saint Katharine Drexel (Chester)

Philadelphia Parish Announcements Effective July 1, 2013


Northwest Philadelphia:

Saint Athanasius and Saint Benedict Parishes
Saint Athanasius (West Oak Lane) and Saint Benedict (Ogontz/Belfield) Parishes will merge at the location and keep the name of Saint Athanasius Parishes. The two parishes are located one mile from each other. For the time being, the Saint Benedict church building will still be maintained as a worship site.

As a result of the merger, the newly formed parish is projected to have over 1,700 registered parishioners and approximately 500 regular attendees at Sunday Mass.
Saint Athanasius Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 15 8
Marriages 3 3
Weekend Mass attendance 387 268

Saint Benedict Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 7 10
Marriages 0 2
Weekend Mass attendance 208 212


Holy Cross, Saint Madeleine Sophie and Saint Therese of the Child Jesus Parishes
Holy Cross (East Mount Airy) Saint Madeleine Sophie (West Mount Airy) and Saint Therese of the Child Jesus (East Mount Airy) Parishes will merge at the location and keep the name of Holy Cross Parish. Holy Cross is located 1.2 miles from Saint Madeleine Sophie and 1.5 miles from Saint Therese of the Child Jesus. For the time being, the Saint Madeleine Sophie and Saint Therese of the Child Jesus church buildings will still be maintained as worship sites.

As a result of the merger, the newly formed parish is projected to have over 2,400 registered parishioners and approximately 460 regular attendees at Sunday Mass.
Holy Cross Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 10 5
Marriages 3 2
Weekend Mass attendance 298 222

Saint Madeleine Sophie Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 4 2
Marriages 3 0
Weekend Mass attendance 210 88

Saint Therese of the Child Jesus Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 0 0
Marriages 1 0
Weekend Mass attendance 363 157



Free Standing Parishes:


As a result of the Pastoral Planning Area initiative it has been determined that the following will remain a free standing parish at this time:

Saint Vincent de Paul (East Germantown, Morton, Wister).

Northeast Philadelphia:

Our Lady of Consolation and Saint Leo the Great Parishes
Our Lady of Consolation (Tacony/Wissinoming) and Saint Leo the Great (Tacony/Wissinoming) Parishes will merge at the location and keep the name of Our Lady of Consolation Parish. The two parishes are located .75 miles from each other. For the time being, the Saint Leo the Great church building will still be maintained as worship sites.

As a result of the merger, the newly formed parish is projected to have over 5,500 registered parishioners and approximately 650 regular attendees at Sunday Mass.
Our Lady of Consolation Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 28 33
Marriages 10 5
Weekend Mass attendance 621 312

Saint Leo the Great Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 17 21
Marriages 5 6
Weekend Mass attendance 555 342



Free Standing Parishes:


As a result of the Pastoral Planning Area initiative it has been determined that the following will remain free standing parishes at this time:

Saint Bartholomew (Frankford), Saint Bernard (Mayfair), Saint Matthew (Mayfair), and Saint Timothy (Mayfair).

Lower Northeast Philadelphia:

Holy Innocents, Saint Joan of Arc, Mater Dolorosa and Saint Joachim Parishes
Holy Innocents (Juniata Park/Feltonville), Saint Joan of Arc (Harrowgate), Mater Dolorosa (Frankford) and Saint Joachim (Frankford) Parishes will merge at the location and keep the name of Holy Innocents Parish. Holy Innocents is located less than 1.5 miles from Saint Joan of Arc, Mater Dolorosa and Saint Joachim. For the time being, the Saint Joan of Arc, Mater Dolorosa, and Saint Joachim church buildings will still be maintained as worship sites.

As a result of the merger, the newly formed parish is projected to have over 8,800 registered parishioners and approximately 1,600 regular attendees at Sunday Mass.
Holy Innocents Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 44 64
Marriages 16 22
Weekend Mass attendance 965 1187

Saint Joan of Arc Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 9 5
Marriages 2 0
Weekend Mass attendance 149 111

Mater Dolorosa Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 6 8
Marriages 3 3
Weekend Mass attendance 153 194

Saint Joachim Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 9 4
Marriages 5 0
Weekend Mass attendance 324 197


West Philadelphia:

Saint Barbara and Saint Rose of Lima Parishes
Saint Barbara (Wynnefield) and Saint Rose of Lima (Haddington/Carroll Park) Parishes will merge at the location and keep the name of Saint Barbara Parish. The two parishes are located 1.2 miles from each other. For the time being, the Saint Rose of Lima church building will still be maintained as worship sites.

As a result of the merger, the newly formed parish is projected to have over 1,400 registered parishioners and approximately 260 regular attendees at Sunday Mass.
Saint Barbara Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 2 3
Marriages 0 0
Weekend Mass attendance 138 126

Saint Rose of Lima Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 3 0
Marriages 0 0
Weekend Mass attendance 184 143


Holy Name of Jesus and Saint Laurentius Parishes
Holy Name of Jesus (Fishtown/Northern Liberties) and Saint Laurentius (Fishtown/Northern Liberties) Parishes will merge at the location and keep the name of Holy Name of Jesus. The two parishes are located a half mile from each other. For the time being, the Saint Laurentius church building will still be maintained as a worship site.
Holy Name of Jesus Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 21 19
Marriages 8 5
Weekend Mass attendance 407 276

Saint Laurentius Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 11 10
Marriages 7 2
Weekend Mass attendance 418 326


Saint Helena, Saint Veronica and Incarnation of Our Lord Parishes:
Incarnation of Our Lord Parish (Olney) will be divided and merge with Saint Helena (Olney) and Saint Veronica (Hunting Park) Parishes. These parishes were not previously engaged in the Parish Pastoral Planning area initiative. However, earlier this year serious concerns regarding the financial condition of Incarnation of Our Lord Parish were brought to the attention of the Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee. After a thorough review of the situation and ongoing dialogue between the Archdiocese and leadership from Incarnation of Our Lord Parish, it was determined that the parish did not possess the resources to sustain itself any longer.

Incarnation of Our Lord Parish is 1.1 miles from Saint Helena Parish and 1.8 miles from Saint Veronica Parish. Parishioners who live north of the Roosevelt Boulevard will attend Mass at Saint Helena Parish. Parishioners who live south of the Roosevelt Boulevard will attend Mass at Saint Veronica Parish. The Incarnation of Our Lord church building will remain open as a worship site of Saint Helena Parish for the time being.
Saint Helena Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 66 41
Marriages 13 16
Weekend Mass attendance 1282 1124

Saint Veronica Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 18 10
Marriages 9 5
Weekend Mass attendance 742 691

Incarnation of Our Lord Parish: 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 48 20
Marriages 12 9
Weekend Mass attendance 1210 685


Free Standing Parishes:


As a result of the Pastoral Planning Area initiative it has been determined that the following will remain free standing parishes at this time:

Saint Agnes-Saint John Nepomucene (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), Saint Augustine (Center City East), Saint Michael (Fishtown/Northern Liberties), Old Saint Joseph's (Center City East), Old Saint Mary's (Center City East), and Saint Peter the Apostle (Fishtown/Northern Liberties).

Previous Announcements:


In January, February and May 2013, the Archdiocese announced parish mergers resulting from the Parish Area Pastoral Planning Initiative in North Philadelphia, Lower Northeast Philadelphia and West Philadelphia. Additional information regarding those mergers can be found at http://archphila.org/conversion/conversion_index.php.

Last year, the Archdiocese announced initial rounds of parish mergers resulting from the Parish Area Pastoral Planning Initiative in Coatesville and Phoenixville in Chester County as well as the Germantown, Harrowgate, and Manayunk sections of Philadelphia. Additional information regarding those mergers can also be found at http://archphila.org/conversion/conversion_index.php.

Future Announcements:


It is expected that additional parishes will engage in the Parish Pastoral Planning Area Initiative in the Fall of 2013. Appropriate announcements will be made in those parishes as well as to the general public at that time.

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Editor's Note: The Archdiocese of Philadelphia is comprised of 44 Pastoral Planning Areas (PPAs). It is expected that the remainder of the first 22 PPAs will complete the work of planning and implementation over the next 15 months. For more information on the Parish Area Pastoral Planning, please visit http://archphila.org/conversion/conversion_index.php.

The pastors assigned to all of the newly formed parishes resulting from this round of mergers were announced this week with the regular priest personnel assignments. A complete list of those assignments can be found at www.CatholicPhilly.com.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput Calls For Relief Efforts To Support Oklahoma Tornado Victims

June 3, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT CALLS FOR RELIEF EFFORTS TO SUPPORT OKLAHOMA TORNADO VICTIMS


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has requested that all parishes in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia take up a one-time, special collection during the month of June to support continued relief efforts in the wake of the tornadoes that devastated Oklahoma last month.

This special collection is part of a national initiative called for by Cardinal Timothy M. Dolan of New York, President of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, to benefit the victims of natural disaster throughout the nation.

All contributed funds will support Catholic Charities' relief efforts for tornado victims and other victims of natural disasters.

The collection will take place on the weekend of either June 8th and 9th or June 15th and 16th at the discretion of individual pastors. It is hoped that, as people take the opportunity to express gratitude for the blessings present in their lives, they will be as generous as possible to those who are still lacking basic necessities and common comforts.

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Editor's Note: For information on Catholic Charities USA please visit https://www.catholiccharitiesusa.org/.


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

The Archdiocesan Choir Of Philadelphia Featured In Finale Of Cathedral Basilica Of Saints Peter And Paul 2012-2013 Concert Series Experience The Best In Sacred And Classical Music In A Cathedral Setting

June 4, 2013

THE ARCHDIOCESAN CHOIR OF PHILADELPHIA FEATURED IN FINALE OF
CATHEDRAL BASILICA OF SAINTS PETER AND PAUL
2012-2013 CONCERT SERIES

Experience the best in Sacred and Classical Music in a Cathedral Setting


The Archdiocesan Choir of Philadelphia and the Archdiocesan Girls' Choir of Philadelphia will present the final installment of the Cathedral Basilica 2012-2013 Concerts Series under the theme, From the Choir Lofts of Paris.

Sunday, June 9, 2013
3:00 p.m.
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Tour the great churches of Paris through an afternoon of sacred music by Franck, Dupré, Messiaen, Fauré, Gounod and Vierne. End the afternoon's musical tour at Notre Dame Cathedral with the center piece, Messe Solennelle by Louis Vierne.

The annual Cathedral Basilica Concert Series, which began last September, features local and international groups in a seven concert series in the historic Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul.

Tickets are on sale and can be purchased by visiting cathedralphilaconcerts.org, and clicking the "Buy Tickets Here" link on the left side of the page.

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Editor's Note: For more information please contact Dr. John Romeri, Director, Office for Liturgical Music, at (215) 587-3696 or email concerts@adphila.org.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: The Evidential Power Of Beauty

June 4, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
THE EVIDENTIAL POWER OF BEAUTY


"Beauty is the battlefield where God and Satan contend for the hearts of men."
-- Dostoyevsky, The Brothers Karamazov

"Late have I loved thee, Beauty so old and so new; late have I loved thee. Lo, you were within, but I was outside, seeking there for you, and upon the shapely things you have made I rushed headlong -- I, misshapen. You were with me, but I was not with you. They held me back far from you, those things which would have no being, were they not in you."
-- Augustine, The Confessions


A friend once told me the story of how she first met God. She doesn't remember her age; it must have been about 4 or 5. Her family lived in the countryside on the rim of one of our big eastern cities. And one June evening, cloudless, moonless, with just the hint of a humid breeze, her father took her out into the back yard in the dark and told her to look up at the sky. From one horizon to the other, all across the black carpet of the night, were the stars -- thousands of them, tens of thousands, in clusters and rivers of light. And in the quiet, her father said, "God made the world beautiful because he loves us."

That was more than 50 years ago. My friend grew up and learned all about entropy and supernovae and colliding galaxies and quantum mechanics and the general theory of relativity. But still, when she closes her eyes, she can see that carpet of stars and hear her father's voice. God made the world beautiful because he loves us.

Creation is more than an accident of dead matter. It's a romance. It has purpose. It sings of the Living God. It bears his signature.

The story of my friend offers several lessons we might consider this week as summer begins and life starts to briefly slow down.

First, the most powerful kind of witness doesn't come from a classroom or pulpit. It doesn't need an academic degree or special techniques. Instead, it grows naturally out of the lives of ordinary people - parents and spouses and friends; people confident in the love that God bears for them and eager to share it with others; people who know the world not as a collection of confused facts but as a symphony of truth and meaning.

Second, nature is sacramental. It points to things outside itself. God speaks and creation sings in silence. We can't hear either if we're cocooned in a web of manufactured distraction, anxiety and noise. We can't see the heavens if our faces are buried in technologies that turn us inward on ourselves. Yet that's exactly what modern American life seems to promote: a restless and relentless material appetite for "more," that gradually feeds selfishness and separates each of us from everyone else.

Third and finally, every experience of real beauty leads us closer to three key virtues: humility, because the grandeur of creation invites awe and lifts us outside ourselves; love, because the human heart was made for glory and joy, and only the Author of life can satisfy its longings; and hope, because no sadness, no despair, can ultimately survive the evidence of divine meaning that beauty provides.

If the world we see taking shape around us today in the name of a false freedom often seems filled with cynicism, ugliness, little blasphemies and sadness, we need to ask why. And then we need to turn our hearts again to the God of beauty - Augustine's "Beauty so old and so new" -- who created us, who sings his longing for us in the grandeur of the world he made, and who renews our souls.

God lives in the summer rain, the stars in the night sky, the wind in the leaves of the trees. He speaks to us through a creation alive with his love. We need to be silent, and watch and listen. And then we need to join in nature's symphony of praise.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Statement Of Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.f.m. Cap. Regarding The Passage Of House Bill 818 Bill Prohibits Taxpayer Funded Insurance Plans From Covering Elective Abortions

June 7, 2013

STATEMENT OF ARCHBISHOP CHARLES J. CHAPUT, O.F.M. CAP.
REGARDING THE PASSAGE OF HOUSE BILL 818

Bill prohibits taxpayer funded insurance plans from covering elective abortions


Pennsylvanians can be pleased that House Bill 818 has passed the full state senate and is headed to Governor Corbett for signature. The legislation wisely prohibits taxpayer funded insurance plans created by the federal healthcare exchange from covering elective abortions. Abortion is violence of the most intimate sort. It has nothing to do with sound medical care, and people shouldn't be forced to fund it.

I'm grateful to the legislators who had the courage to take a stand for the dignity of human life and to all who encouraged them to do so.

Much work remains to be done. The effort to protect and promote a culture of life will be ongoing. May God deepen our commitment to advancing the dignity of women and their children -- born and unborn.

# # #


Editor's Note: For more information on House Bill 818, please visit http://www.pacatholic.org/pro-life-bill-passes-senate-heads-to-governor/.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Catholic Social Services Selected As New Community Umbrella Agency By Philadelphia Department Of Human Services

June 10, 2013

CATHOLIC SOCIAL SERVICES SELECTED AS NEW COMMUNITY UMBRELLA AGENCY BY
PHILADELPHIA DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES


Catholic Social Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia (CSS) has been selected as a Community Umbrella Agency (CUA) for the Department of Human Services (DHS) under their new model Improving Outcomes for Children. Catholic Social Services is one of three community based organizations most recently selected by DHS to manage the cases of the city's most at-risk youth. CSS will serve children and families in the 2nd, 7th and 8th police districts. When DHS completes the selection process, there will be ten CUAs serving the entire city.

With more than 200 years of meeting basic human needs within the Philadelphia area, CSS has a proven track record of providing services to transform the lives of children and families in need. As a Community Umbrella Agency, CSS will have sole responsibility managing all DHS cases in the Far Northeast sections of Philadelphia. Wordsworth and First Home Care were also selected as Community Umbrella Agencies, managing cases in the Logan/Olney area and in the Lower Northeast respectively, bringing the total of Community Umbrella Agencies to five.

"Catholic Social Services sees working under the Improving Outcomes for Children model as an opportunity to keep children safely in their homes and communities and out of congregate care," said CSS Director of Youth Services, Joe Lavoritano. "Key to the success of this initiative will be our ability to involve the entire community in addressing safety and well-being needs, and our ability to address the impact of trauma and the promotion of non-violence as a public health issue in our work with the children and families we serve."

CSS will have case managers, supervisors and administrative support staff in place in the Northeast beginning October 1st, 2013.

CSS is the largest subcontractor with DHS. 165,000 clients are annually served throughout the full spectrum of CSS programs. Motivated by its mission to serve the most vulnerable and at-risk members of our society, CSS offers a variety of community-based and residential programs and services to assist and support men, women and children living in Philadelphia and its four surrounding counties. Each day, services touch the lives of immigrants, the homeless, women in crisis, dependent or delinquent youth, senior citizens, and the developmentally disabled. Catholic Social Services provides help and creates hope for people from every walk of life.

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Editor's Note: For more information about Catholic Social Services, please visit http://www.catholicsocialservicesphilly.org/.


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocesan Class Of 2013 Earns $277 Million In College Scholarships Figure Reflects One Of The Largest Totals In Archdiocesan History.

June 13, 2013

ARCHDIOCESAN CLASS OF 2013 EARNS
$277 MILLION IN COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS

Figure reflects one of the largest totals in Archdiocesan history.


The Office of Catholic Education (OCE) and the Faith in the Future Foundation are proud to announce that 3,616 young men and women who graduated from the 17 high schools of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia this June have earned a grand total of $276,806,921 in scholarships. This scholarship total, which includes both academic and athletic scholarships, is one of the largest in Archdiocesan history. 93% of the Class of 2013 will pursue a post-secondary education. The Archdiocese of Philadelphia also had a high school graduation rate of 99% this year.

Among the scholarship winners are two Gates Millennium Scholars, Sharnita Midgett of Archbishop Ryan High School and Sadiyah Malcom of West Philadelphia Catholic High School. The Gates Millennium Scholars Program selects 1,000 talented students each year to receive a good-through-graduation (B.A., M.A., and Ph.D.) scholarship to use at any college or university of their choice. Ms. Midgett and Ms. Malcom were chosen from among 50,000 applicants nationally.

"We couldn't be prouder of the Class of 2013. Through hard work and dedication, these students have earned an impressive amount of scholarship money towards their post-secondary education," said Dr. Carol Cary, Superintendent for Secondary Schools. "The Class of 2013's success further highlights the value of a Catholic Education. Students from our secondary schools are some of the most gifted and talented students in the area. All graduates remain in our prayers as they continue their educational journeys."

"We believe so strongly in these students and the quality Catholic Education they've earned," said Samuel Casey Carter, Chief Executive Officer of Faith in the Future. "The staggering amount of scholarship money this class has achieved is a testament to the strength of this school system and the importance of continuing its growth." "The tools their education has given them will carry the Class of 2013 far into the future. We wish them much success and happiness in their pursuits."


Faith in the Future, is the independent foundation that now oversees the Office of Catholic Education and operates the 17 high schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

Over half (53%) of the members of the Archdiocesan Class of 2013 were offered at least one college scholarship. 6,172 total scholarships were awarded to members of the Archdiocesan Class of 2013. Since 2000, Archdiocesan graduates have received more than $2.3 billion in scholarships.

# # #


Editor's Note: For information about Catholic Schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, please visit www.catholicschools-phl.org.


Contact
Bonnie Olinger
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput Calls For Sunday For Justice For Immigrants Sunday, June 30th Will Be Designated As A Day Of Prayer For The Development Of Just Immigration Policy.

June 17, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT CALLS FOR
SUNDAY FOR JUSTICE FOR IMMIGRANTS

Sunday, June 30th will be designated as a day of prayer
for the development of just immigration policy.


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has designated Sunday June 30th as Sunday for Justice for Immigrants in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. This call comes in light of recent deliberations in the United States Senate regarding Senate Bill 744.

This proposed legislation would tighten border security while creating a clear path to citizenship within a reasonable timeframe and cost for the estimated 11 million immigrants living in the country illegally. The bill would also remove some obstacles that currently obstruct family unification.

Archbishop Chaput will celebrate a Mass for the intention of Justice for Immigrants. All are welcome to attend.

Sunday June 30, 2013
6:30 p.m.
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Faithful throughout the Archdiocese are encouraged to respond to the plight of immigrants in our parishes and communities in three ways: Catholics should understand the challenges immigrants face each day and know the Church's position in support of just immigrant reform, write to Congress offering support of the U.S. Catholic Bishops Immigrants Campaign, and bring concerns for justice before the Lord in personal prayer.

Editor's Note: No multi-box feed will be provided. Television cameras and still photographers will be permitted inside the Cathedral. For more information on the Catholic Church's position on immigration, please visit http://www.usccb.org/issues-and-action/human-life-and-dignity/immigration/.

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Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Nutritional Development Services To Hold Annual Blessing Of The Summer The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Kicks Off Its Summer Meals Program

June 19, 2013

NUTRITIONAL DEVELOPMENT SERVICES
TO HOLD ANNUAL BLESSING OF THE SUMMER
The Archdiocese of Philadelphia kicks off its Summer Meals Program


Nutritional Development Services (NDS) of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia is sponsoring its annual
Blessing of the Summer to kick off its Summer Meals Program. Monsignor Daniel Sullivan, President of the NDS Board, will preside over the blessing at Mercy Neighborhood Ministries in North Philadelphia.

Friday, June 21, 2013
12:00 pm
Immediately Followed by Lunch
Mercy Neighborhood Ministries
1939 West Venango Street
Philadelphia, PA 19140


The Summer Meals Program is federally funded, operated nationally by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and administered by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. This year the NDS Summer Meals Program runs from June 17th through August 23rd.

In Summer 2012, NDS worked with 468 sites and served over 873,000 meals throughout the Philadelphia region. NDS partners with dedicated community leaders to provide service to families and contribute to the health and well-being of children in Philadelphia and the surrounding area.

So far this year, NDS has coordinated over 400 sites and introduced a new menu. NDS meals follow the new federal guidelines closely. Half of the meal components are now fruits and vegetables. The new menu includes more fresh products, whole grains and skim milk.

Participating sites offer children lunch and a choice of breakfast or a snack. Most Philadelphia and many suburban neighborhoods qualify for the program. Children participating in the program are invited to enter a Creative Writing Contest and a Poster Contest which promotes peace in the community.

# # #


Editor's Note: To sign up for the Summer Meals Program or for more information on Nutritional Development Services, please call Anne Ayella at 267-262-8901.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Launches New Website For Youth And Young Adult Ministry

June 17, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA LAUNCHES
NEW WEBSITE FOR YOUTH AND YOUNG ADULT MINISTRY


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia is pleased to announce the launching of its new Youth and Young Adult Ministry website: www.PhillyCatholicYYAM.org.

It features information and events for Youth and Young Adult Ministry, which includes college students. It is an endeavor of the Office for Catechetical Formation, under the direction of Father John Ames. His office is responsible for organizing and promoting ministry to youth and young adults throughout the five-county Archdiocese.

Father Ames sees the new website as an opportunity to evangelize youth and young adults in the Archdiocese. "Pope John Paul II, Pope Benedict XVI and Pope Francis have encouraged the use of modern technology in the service of spreading the Gospel," said Father Ames. "With the help of the Holy Spirit, this website, combined with our efforts in social media, will ignite a renewed enthusiasm to reach out to young people in parishes throughout the Archdiocese."

Youth and Young Adult Ministry seeks to empower parishes to foster the mission of evangelizing and catechizing youth and young adults and increase the professional development of youth ministers and volunteers.

Through its digital communications efforts Youth and Young Adult Ministry will strengthen its catechetical component and youth ministry leaders will be offered support and resources to assist them in their work with young people. The Office for Catechetical Formation is collaborating with priests, youth ministry leaders, parishes and schools throughout the Archdiocese to accomplish these goals.

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Editor's Note: For more information, please contact the Office for Catechetical Formation at 215-587-4544.
Facebook: Philly Catholic Youth and Young Adult Ministry Twitter: @PhillyCathYYAM
Web: www.PhillyCatholicYYAM.org.


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Saint John's Hospice Announces 50th Anniversary Celebration This Agency Of Catholic Social Services Has Served More Than 6 Million Men Struggling With Homelessness

June 19, 2013

SAINT JOHN'S HOSPICE ANNOUNCES
50TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

This Agency of Catholic Social Services Has Served
More than 6 Million Men Struggling with Homelessness


Since opening its doors on September 7th 1963 Saint John's Hospice has served the needs of homeless and hungry men in the city of Philadelphia. Providing food, shelter, clothing and counseling, Saint John's Hospice prides itself in being a community grounded in faith and service, where homeless persons can find dignity, respect, nourishment and opportunities for new beginnings.

To celebrate 50 years of service to Philadelphia's male homeless population, an Anniversary Gala will be held to raise funds in support of its mission.

Sunday September 7, 2013
7:30 p.m.
Reading Terminal Market
51 North 12th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19107


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will be the guest of honor. Other distinguished guests, staff, volunteers and benefactors are expected to attend. Guests will enjoy entertainment provided by Joe Conklin and the Greaseband, along with food, drink, auctions and raffles.

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Editor's Note: Saint John's Hospice offers a daily lunch program currently serving an average of 350 men each day. Showers, clothing, personal hygiene articles and mail service are also offered to those in need. The facility includes a 52-bed shelter for homeless men, including 12 beds specifically for those men in fragile medical condition.

Major funding for the services provided comes from private donations. To learn more about Saint John's Hospice, to register to attend, or to become a sponsor for the 50th Anniversary Gala, please visit www.saintjohnshospice.org.


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Saint Gabriel's Hall Achieves Healthierus School Challenge Saint Gabriel's Hall To Receive Silver Award For Actively Emphasizing Healthy Menus And Physical Education

June 20, 2013

SAINT GABRIEL'S HALL ACHIEVES HEALTHIERUS
SCHOOL CHALLENGE

Saint Gabriel's Hall to receive Silver Award for actively emphasizing
healthy menus and physical education.


Saint Gabriel's Hall (SGH) of Catholic Social Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia has been presented a Silver Award by the HealthierUS School Challenge (HUSSC), which is sponsored by the USDA. The Silver Award included a $1000 prize. As part of the challenge, Saint Gabriel's Hall worked to support and improve the health of its students by offering healthy items on its school lunch menu, and emphasizing nutrition education and physical activity.

HUSSC is a voluntary national certification initiative for schools participating in the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs. Saint Gabriel's Hall met HealthierUS School's criteria by demonstrating its commitment to a healthy school environment, as well as implementing a school wellness policy. Schools receiving a HUSSC award commit to meeting this standard throughout their four-year certification period.

Saint Gabriel's Hall School lunch program is provided through Nutritional Development Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

Saint Gabriel's Hall (SGH) is a residential program for delinquent male youths located in Audubon, PA. It offers a year-round academic program as well as career and technical education in Culinary Arts, Microsoft Office, Building and Landscape Maintenance, and Youth BuildConstruction.

# # #


Editor's Note: For more information on Saint Gabriel's Hall please contact Kathleen Statue at (215) 895-3470 or visit st-gabes.org/residential/saint-gabriels-hall.

Nutritional Development Services (NDS) mission is to provide meals, food assistance and additional support to organizations serving children and the poor as an extension of the services and mission of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Speacialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Human Dignity And Human Trafficking

June 19, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
HUMAN DIGNITY AND HUMAN TRAFFICKING


"[T]oday there are millions of women and children around the world enslaved without a voice in situations of forced labor and sexual exploitation from which they cannot free themselves. This horrific phenomenon is the third largest crime in the world, behind only the illicit sale of drugs and arms."

-- James Nicholson, former U.S. Ambassador to the Holy See, 2004

"Prostitution is not a new phenomenon. What is new is the existence of a global and complex trade that exploits situations of poverty and vulnerability that many women find themselves in, and exports [these women] into the sex industry.

"In Italy, there are an estimated 50,000-70,000 women and girls from East Africa, Latin America and Eastern Europe who are prostituted on streets, in nightclubs and in private brothels. Some 30 percent to 40 percent are minors. They typically have no documents, because traffickers seize their passports and papers in order to control them. Upon arrival, traffickers and pimps often tell women they must work off a huge debt, which they had not heard about before leaving home.

"To pay back this debt bond set at 40,000-70,000 Euros [$54,000-$94,000], Nigerian women must undergo at least 4,000 sexual encounters. On top of this, they are charged for food, lodging and even the space on the sidewalk where they stand."

-- Consolata Missionary Sister Eugenia Bonetti, anti-trafficking activist, 2007


James Nicholson is probably best known as a successful businessman, attorney and former U.S. secretary for veterans' affairs. But he also served with distinction as our country's envoy to the Holy See. One of the issues he championed during his tenure, working closely with the Vatican, was the global fight against human trafficking - the lifeblood of modern forced labor and sexual exploitation.

Officially, worldwide slavery ended more than a century ago. Unofficially, it's a growth industry. Hundreds of thousands of women and children - some estimates place the number as high as 1.2 million - are trafficked every year. Many come from poor countries and end up as prostitutes in the developed world. Others are forced to work for little or no money in hotels, sweat shops, massage parlors and in agriculture. Some are simply abducted. Some are homeless runaways. For many others, well-organized criminal recruiting rings promise young people in the developing world an opportunity for marriage, good jobs or a better life in Europe and United States. Then they break down their victims' dignity with rape, blackmail and beatings, and use them as objects for labor and sex until their health collapses.

In many countries, traffickers bribe the police to look the other way. But even in places where the authorities vigorously attack human trafficking, laws are often inadequate, and victims are often too frightened or ashamed to step forward.

All of this sounds barbaric, and of course it is; a word like "barbaric" frankly understates the bitter suffering involved. The Holy See, religious communities and many other people of good will - Consolata Sister Eugenia Bonetti has given global and heroic witness on this issue -- have worked to publicize the plague of human trafficking for years and to mobilize government action against it. The reason is obvious. If every human being is made in the image of God and loved infinitely by his or her Creator, then human trafficking is a kind of blasphemy, a sacrilege; a crime against God himself. The same reverence for human life that drives Christians to speak out for the poor, the disabled, the immigrant and the unborn child should lead us to work against human trafficking and to help its victims.

What we need to realize as we end this column this week is that human trafficking isn't something that only happens "out there" in some faraway foreign country. Many thousands of women and children are victims of trafficking right here in the United States every year. That includes Philadelphia, our home; our own backyard. And I hope that in the year ahead, more and more of our people in the Catholic community will become aware of human trafficking and get involved to end this kind of contempt for human dignity.

A good place to start is by contacting Mr. Hugh Organ, associate executive director of Covenant House Pennsylvania, at 215.951.5411, x2118. Covenant House is a member of the Philadelphia Anti-Trafficking Coalition, and Hugh is a dedicated and well-informed source on the local dimensions of the human trafficking issue. Or contact the National Human Trafficking Resource Center directly at 1.888.3737.888.

God created men and women to be his sons and daughters, not property; not trash; not chattel. The way to end this ruinous evil is through good people fighting it now.

Hugh Organ can also be reached by surface mail at: Covenant House Pennsylvania, 31 East Armat Street, Philadelphia, PA 19144; or by email at horgan@covenanthousepa.org.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Immigration Reform-renewing The Soul Of A Nation

June 24, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
IMMIGRATION REFORM-RENEWING THE SOUL OF A NATION


"Why should Pennsylvania, founded by the English, become a Colony of Aliens, who will shortly be so numerous as to Germanize us instead of us Anglifying them, and will never adopt our Language or Customs?"

-- Benjamin Franklin, 1751

"Immigration is about more than immigration. It is about renewing the soul of America."

-- +Jose H. Gomez, Archbishop of Los Angeles, 2013


Last week, in a June 18 editorial, the Wall Street Journal reminded Americans that "the evidence overwhelmingly shows that today's immigrants are acculturating and moving up the economic ladder like previous generations," and that "despite fears and much bad data [among the general public], immigrants continue to be the American asset they have always been." Hispanic and Asian immigrants make up about 70 percent of foreign-born adults in the United States. And studies show - no surprise -- that "second generation Hispanics and Asians place more importance than does the general public on hard work and career success."

For Hispanics and Asians, as with earlier waves of immigrants, education is highly valued, with "English [the] dominant language of the second generation, and by the fourth generation, fewer than a quarter can still speak the immigrant tongue."

The Journal speaks from economic common sense. But sane voices have been rare in America's immigration debates. We're a nation of immigrants constantly worried that the next gang of newcomers will ruin the country. More than 260 years ago, Benjamin Franklin fretted that newly arrived hordes of German-speaking aliens would steal the identity of Pennsylvania. We know how that turned out.

So it goes today. Both political parties share the blame. Republicans, especially in the House, channel the country's fears of being overrun by foreign freeloaders and criminals. The current (Democratic) administration, for all its pro-Latino rhetoric, has kicked out roughly 1.5 million people over the past four years, more than the previous Bush administration. The current White House had no qualms about declining to enforce the Defense of Marriage Act, yet it relentlessly deported more than 400,000 "illegals" in 2012 alone - a record number.

The human cost of this immigration gridlock is massive. As Los Angeles Archbishop Jose Gomez writes in his extraordinary new book, Immigration and the Next America:

"More than 5 million children [in the United States] are growing up in homes with one or more 'illegal' parents, and about 80 percent of these kids are American citizens, born in this country . . . We say we are worried about the long-term social costs of illegal immigration. If we are, then we should be looking for every way possible to integrate the undocumented into our economy so that they do not become a permanent underclass of dependent people. Our policy today, unfortunately, is only helping that underclass grow in numbers. The underclass grows every time we break apart a family by deporting a working father and leaving women and children behind in poverty. We [risk] creating, through our inaction, the very conditions that we claim to be afraid of - a generation of people who can't assimilate, and who don't have the education and skills to contribute to our economy."


The word "extraordinary" doesn't fully capture the value of Gomez's brief book. The Wall Street Journal sees immigration as mainly an economic matter. But Archbishop Gomez goes deeper into the issue, tying together culture, faith, social research, history, a hemispheric perspective and his personal experience as an immigrant. Born in Monterrey, Mexico, and a naturalized U.S. citizen, the archbishop has roots in both cultures, with family on both sides of the border. But the special love he bears for his adopted country emerges from every page. He has no use for the politics of ethnic bitterness or entitlement. He wastes no time on naïve sloganeering. Instead, he repeatedly makes clear his respect for those who are wary of immigration reform out of concern for public safety, financial stability and the integrity of our nation's laws. He shares some of the same concerns.

At the same time, he makes a powerful case - the best case I've seen so far - for the urgency of deep reform now. Real reform must include a reasonable path to citizenship for the 11 million undocumented workers now living in the United States; an end to the deportations that destroy families; and - eventually - a serious effort to remedy the hemispheric inequities that drive foreign workers into our country out of desperation. For Gomez, what's at stake is the soul of our nation in the years ahead:

"If immigration reform is to succeed - if the American dream is to be renewed - we need to reject the [cynicism of America's cultural elites] and the careless disregard for American identity. We need to restore the ideal of citizenship based on integration and Americanization. Immigrants should be welcomed within a civic framework built on a common American story and universal values. We should be promoting broad expectations for citizens - including the understanding that individual rights presume common duties; and that freedom doesn't mean doing whatever we want, but instead means doing what is true and beautiful and good."

For Archbishop Gomez, "a civic framework built on a common American story" demands that we honor our Anglo-Protestant roots as a nation. But it also demands that we recover -- at long last -- the other, missing half of our story: the Hispano-Catholic legacy that predates the Thirteen Colonies by many decades. America's real "first Thanksgiving" took place in Spanish Catholic Florida, not Puritan Massachusetts. "Two hundred years before any of the founding fathers were born," the archbishop reminds us, "this land's people were being baptized in the name of Christ. The people of this land were called Christians before they were called Americans. And they were first called this name in the Spanish tongue."

On June 30, we celebrate Justice for Immigrants Sunday across the archdiocese. It's a key moment in the life of our Church. I urge every one of our parishes in the coming months to read and discuss Archbishop Gomez's words. Rich in content, vividly written and profoundly hopeful in spirit, Immigration and the Next America is a priceless gift in a small package; the kind of book we need to carry around in our hearts as we deal with the changing landscape of our nation. Read it. Pray over it. Then share it with others. It's that important.

"Immigration and the Next America: Renewing the Soul of Our Nation," by Archbishop Jose H. Gomez, will be published in English (July 5) and Spanish (July 19) by Our Sunday Visitor, Huntington, IN. Available now for pre-order on Amazon.com.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Statement Of Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.f.m Cap. Regarding Supreme Court Ruling On Doma

June 26, 2013

STATEMENT OF ARCHBISHOP CHARLES J. CHAPUT, O.F.M CAP.
REGARDING SUPREME COURT RULING ON DOMA


In striking down Sec. 3 of the federal Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in United States v. Windsor, the Court leaves intact - at least for now -- state constitutional definitions of marriage as an institution restricted to one man and one woman. As Justice Samuel Alito points out in his dissent, no federal "right" to same-sex marriage exists. The Constitution simply does not establish one.

As Catholics we believe marriage needs to be strengthened, not redefined. It is a great gift to men, women, children and society. Affirming the true definition of marriage denies no one his or her basic rights. On the contrary protecting marriage affirms the equal dignity of women and men and safeguards the basic rights of children.

Same-sex unions, whatever legal form they take, cannot create new life. They cannot duplicate the love of a man and woman. But they do copy marriage and family, and in the process, they compete with and diminish the uniquely important status of both. The legal battle about marriage will continue. And the Church's commitment to promote the authentic meaning of marriage and family will be vigorously pursued.

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Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Saint Gabriel's System Graduates Record Number Of Students This Agency Of Catholic Social Services Has Prepared At Risk Youth For A Brighter Future

June 27, 2013

SAINT GABRIEL'S SYSTEM GRADUATES
RECORD NUMBER OF STUDENTS

This agency of Catholic Social Services has prepared at risk youth for a brighter future


Catholic Social Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia (CSS) is proud to announce that 142 young men have graduated from Saint Gabriel's System (SGS) with a diploma and career technical education certificate. This year's class marks the highest number of graduates since CSS Youth Services began tracking graduates in 1985.

This year's record number of graduates, up from only 57 in 2007, can be attributed to the tracking and recording of students released from Saint Gabriel's Hall residential program and to the investments made in a night school, giving students more options to further their education. SGH's own tracking data showed that the young men with diplomas and certifications were more likely to continue their education elsewhere, gain employment and avoid immediate incarceration.

"Our research has shown us that youths in possession of a diploma and a career technical education (CTE) certificate were much less likely to be rearrested," said Joe Lavoritano, Executive Director of St. Gabriel's System. "We used this data and placed an emphasis on obtaining that diploma and certification. Since we made this a priority, the results have been outstanding."

Partnering with Pennsylvania Academic and Career Technical Training Alliance (PACTT), Saint Gabriel's Hall has developed a quality academic curriculum aligned with state standards and fully integrated with career technical training. The combination of academics and vocational training has helped students become more employable.

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Editor's Note: The St. Gabriel's System is a multi-service agency of the Archdiocese under CSS Youth Services that provides residential and community-based services for court adjudicated delinquent youth between the ages of 10 and 19 years old. For more information on these services, please visit http://www.st-gabes.org/.


Contact
Annie Korp
Communications Assistant
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Looking Ahead To The Archdiocesan Financial Report

June 28, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
LOOKING AHEAD TO THE ARCHDIOCESAN FINANCIAL REPORT


The wife of a friend once quipped that there's not much sizzle or romance in balancing a check book - but try feeding the kids if you can't. I've never forgotten her words. No sensible adult goes very long without paying close attention to the finances of his or her own family. And for good reason: Without the necessary resources, no family survives. If a family has financial problems, it needs to know why. That requires accurate information, no matter how complex and sobering, so the problems can be fixed.

So it is with the Church. As I've said many times over the past 22 months, the resources of the Church don't belong to the bishops or the clergy or some remote institution. They belong to her people. The Church is a steward. She holds her resources in trust for her people, to carry out their apostolic work as a community in furthering the Gospel of Jesus Christ. That means she has an obligation to use her resources well. She also has a duty to make an accurate yearly accounting to her people of how she manages those resources, whether the news is happy or not.

One of the many urgencies facing the Church when I arrived here in September 2011 was the need to understand and start fixing our financial problems. We've made progress. Over the past year, we've benefitted from strong, new financial leadership from our CFO, Timothy O'Shaughnessy; our controller, Peter Yecco; and a reinvigorated Archdiocesan Finance Council with talent from across the Catholic business community.

Despite every difficulty we have faced, our people have increased their giving to the annual Catholic Charities Appeal as well as the annual Seminary Appeal. And along with monies raised from the sale of the archbishop's residence and a home on the New Jersey shore - beautiful properties, but unsuited to the needs of the Church today - we've taken big steps toward raising new resources and eventually eliminating our annual budget deficit.

This good news, however, will need to wait until later when we'll publish the results of Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 - i.e., the year beginning July 1, 2012, and ending this weekend, on June 30, 2013.

In other words, the fiscal report we plan to publish next week will reflect almost none of the progress I just described. Why? Because it will show our financial results from July 1, 2011 - two months before I arrived in Philadelphia - through June 30, 2012, barely two months after our new financial team began their work.

I've asked our staff to make the report on FY 2012 as thorough and clear as possible. The audited financial statements for every major archdiocesan entity will appear on our website for public review. I've also directed that in the future, as we continue to improve our operations, our annual financial reports will appear for our people's scrutiny far more promptly and with proper standards of transparency.

I've reviewed the FY 2012 audited financial statements for our central operations run through the Archdiocesan Pastoral Center; or more technically, the "Office for Financial Services." While the results are serious - and that's an understatement - they have the virtue of being honest and accurate. The statements also include several major adjustments to reporting made in previous years. Most of the financial pain we now face as a local Church is inherited and due to chronic patterns of behavior. It has nothing to do with fraud or the abuse crisis. Instead it flows out of well-intentioned but poor management decisions made over a period of nearly two decades at every level of archdiocesan and parish leadership - a crippling habit of trying to hang on to the past and keep unsustainable ministries, schools and parishes afloat, despite great changes in our demographic and financial realities.

We have too many good people in the Archdiocese to let these problems continue to hobble our discipleship in the years ahead. We owe too much to the believers who came before us to fail in renewing the health of our Church. And we owe even more to the young people who will follow us. They need to encounter Jesus Christ through our witness. That's why our financial problems matter so seriously. And that's why, with honesty and hard work and the grace of God, we'll resolve them.

We will post the audited financial statements for the Office for Financial Services on www.CatholicPhilly.com on Wednesday, July 3 at 10:00 a.m. Please note that these statements only relate to operations and ministries stemming from Archdiocesan headquarters. They do not include financials for the Office of Catholic Education, Catholic Healthcare Services, Catholic Social Services, Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary, Catholic Charities Appeal or the Heritage of Faith-Vision of Hope Capital Campaign. Audited reports for those entities will be posted in the coming weeks.

Also note that none of these reports will include financial statements for parishes -- and for good reason: All parishes are autonomous entities. The Archdiocese has no authority over their assets.


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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Catholic Press Association Honors Archdiocesan Online Publication Catholicphilly.com Brings Home Two Awards From Convention

July 1, 2013

Catholic Press Association Honors Archdiocesan Online Publication
CatholicPhilly.com Brings Home Two Awards from Convention


CatholicPhilly.com was presented with two awards at the third annual Catholic Media Convention, held by the Catholic Press Association, on June 21st in Denver Colorado.

The Archdiocese's official digital news outlet won third place for "Best General Publisher Website" and honorable mention for "Best Electronic Newsletter." As the digital successor to The Catholic Standard and Times, CatholicPhilly.com was applauded for its "clean navigation," inviting readers to continue browsing the site for news and information daily. Their newsletter, in existence since 2012, is now sent to over 2,000 subscribers, linking to local, national and world news stories, features about Catholics around the globe and Archbishop Chaput's weekly column.

"The recognition CatholicPhilly.com receives through these awards reflects the desire of Catholics in Southeastern Pennsylvania for Catholic news and information they can depend on, as well as the efforts of our talented staff to produce it," said Matthew Gambino, Director and General Manager of CatholicPhilly.com. "We bring this quality content, as well as the advertisers who support it, to the Catholic community every day, as we proclaim the Good News of Christ and the good works of the Catholic Church in this region."

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Editor's Note: For more information, please visit www.CatholicPhilly.com


Contact
Annie Korp
Communications Assistant
215-587-3727

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Christian Witness And America's Birthday

July 2, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
CHRISTIAN WITNESS AND AMERICA'S BIRTHDAY


In his great biography of Benjamin Franklin, Walter Isaacson noted that Franklin donated money to "the building funds of each and every sect in Philadelphia." For Franklin and his founding brothers, religion promoted the civic virtue essential to sustaining the republican model of government. Franklin was a deist throughout his life. But he understood, nonetheless, that religious belief had concrete, powerful and very positive implications for shaping public life.

There are many Benjamin Franklins today, who, whether believers or not, welcome the contributions of religious faith to the public square. Many others, however, including some who hold public office, view religion as a problem and a threat to democratic values. They see its moral norms not as benefiting the public but as limiting individual rights. Yet, without the vigorous religious freedom that was supported by Franklin and enshrined by Madison and others - as opposed to the far more restricted "freedom of worship" preferred by some of today's public officials -- the United States faces the prospect of undermining the very civic virtues that were meant to sustain it.

In this Year of Faith, we Catholics are called to carve out some time for daily silence; to examine our priorities in a fresh way; and to educate ourselves in the vital elements of our faith. Unfortunately, over the last two generations, Catholic catechesis has too often tended to be both boring and uninformative. As a Church, we've too often done a poor job of transmitting the joy and the urgency of the Gospel's message of liberation from sin. Our appetite to evangelize, to preach the message of the reign of God through the example of our daily lives, has not fared much better. But that can change; and for the sake of the generations who will follow us, it - and we -- need to change. Pope Benedict and now Pope Francis have asked Catholics to make a conscious, sustained effort to return to the basics of Christian discipleship.

Some of the practical steps Catholics can take to enrich their experience of the Year of Faith are obvious: studying what the Church teaches through Scripture, the Catechism and the documents of Vatican II; taking part in the sacraments with renewed zeal; cultivating a deeper prayer and family life; and performing works of charity and service. These things are no different from what Catholics are asked to do every year. But the Year of Faith is a chance to reenergize our discipleship with mindfulness and intention.

We should also consider two more practical suggestions, especially for young Catholics: Nurture good friendships, and cultivate hope. Good Christian friendships are the most powerful way of building, sharing and reinforcing our faith, and promoting communion with others. We need to remind ourselves every day that Jesus Christ has already won the final victory through his death and resurrection. We should never lose hope for ourselves or the world around us.

Fidelity to the Gospel may sometimes seem like an overwhelming and thankless task. Popular culture is often cold to religious practice. Government increasingly seems hostile to the good work done by religious organizations. But boldly and faithfully living our Baptism is the single greatest contribution we can make to the Church and our nation. The obstacles to vigorous religious faith and practice are far greater today than they were in the time of Franklin. But the consequences of religious indifference - both for the Church and for our country - are extraordinarily damaging.

The moral renewal of our nation begins with the moral renewal we allow God to work in each of our own hearts. That's something to pray for this week as we honor the birthday of the United States, and every day of our lives in the months and years ahead.

May God bless all of us, and the nation we call home, this Independence Day.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Statement Of Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.f.m Cap. Regarding Announcement Of Sainthood For Blessed Pope John Paul Ii And Blessed Pope John XXIII

July 6, 2013

STATEMENT OF ARCHBISHOP CHARLES J. CHAPUT, O.F.M CAP.
REGARDING ANNOUNCEMENT OF SAINTHOOD
FOR BLESSED POPE JOHN PAUL II AND BLESSED POPE JOHN XXIII


I received with joy the news from the Vatican that both Blessed Pope John Paul II and Blessed Pope John XXIII will be canonized saints. The pontificates of these two men shaped Catholicism as we know and practice it today. In convening the Second Vatican Council, John XXIII ushered in an era of reform that touched every facet of the universal Church. Throughout his long reign, John Paul II exhibited compassion and love for members of the Church around the world and worked diligently to advance social justice issues on behalf of those neglected by society.

I invite all of the priests, deacons, religious and lay faithful of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia to join me in raising their voices and hearts in prayerful thanksgiving for the lives and saintly examples of John XXIII and John Paul II.

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Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Celebrate Mass Of Thanksgiving For Saint Kateri Tekakwitha

July 8, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO CELEBRATE MASS OF THANKSGIVING FOR SAINT KATERI TEKAKWITHA


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will be the main celebrant and homilist at a Mass of Thanksgiving for the Canonization of Saint Kateri Tekakwitha.

Sunday, July 14, 2013
5:30 p.m. Confession Available
6:30 p.m. Mass
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Saint Kateri Tekakwitha is the first Native American to be declared a saint. She was canonized by Pope Benedict XVI on October 21, 2012. The patron saint of the environment and ecology was just 24 years old when she died. Her feast day is July 14th.

All are welcome to attend. Confessions before Mass will begin at 5:30 p.m.

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Editor's Note: No multi-box feed will be provided. Television cameras and still photographers will be permitted inside the Cathedral.


Contact
Annie Korp
Communications Assistant
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Wisdom And Christian Witness

July 11, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
WISDOM AND CHRISTIAN WITNESS


In a few months we'll close out the Year of Faith that began under Pope Benedict and was highlighted so beautifully in Pope Francis' first encyclical, Lumen Fidei. In the past year - in fact, in every year now, according to the Holy See - more than 100,000 Christians are killed worldwide for reasons related to their faith. That's the real cost of discipleship. That's a measure of heroic character.

I've spoken many times about the importance of religious freedom and the need for all of us to actively witness our Christian faith not only in our private lives but also in the public square. The sacrifice of Christians in other countries, who write their Gospel witness in their own blood, places an obligation on all of us to live our faith with courage and zeal, endurance and hope, and to begin every new day by grounding our hearts and our actions in the wisdom of the Church.

Nothing is more compelling than a good man, or a good woman, in an evil time. Wisdom is the pursuit of the true, the right and the lasting. In the record of Scripture and the witness of the Church, all these things find their source in God, and nowhere else but God.

Genesis tells the story of the Tower of Babel (11:1-9), and it carries a useful lesson. The pride of men in seeking "to make a name for [themselves]" and to build a tower to heaven leads God to confuse man's language and scatter humanity. But I think God intervened against Babel not to punish man but to save humanity from itself. In the Bible passage, God says, "If now, while they are one people all speaking the same language, they have started to do this, nothing will later stop them from doing whatever they presume."

In an age of genetics, neuroscience and nanotechnology; an age of political arrogance; an age that refuses to admit the purpose of human sexuality, or even that man himself has an inherent identity, free will or nature, those words from Scripture should make each of us pause.

In his great work, The City of God, St. Augustine created a portrait of the world divided into two cities -- the City of God with its eyes set on heaven, and the City of Man rooted in pride and sin. Life consists in choosing one or the other. It's a choice we can't avoid. And each of us faces that choice right here, today, now. The wisdom which the Church offers the world is for the humble, not the proud, and it's the only wisdom that counts: the path to salvation.

But this salvation is not a philosophy or an ideology, an idea or ideals. No one can "love" an idea, and yet the heart of real wisdom is the ability and willingness to love. Augustine says that all of the wisdom in the Old Testament literally takes on flesh in the New Testament. The reason is simple. Jesus Christ is the Word of God -- the Wisdom of God - God as love incarnate. Jesus himself says, "I am the bread of life." He says, "I am the way, the truth, and the life."

No one can love an idea. But we can love and be loved by Jesus Christ. We can meet and be met by God's Son. The true, the right and the lasting meet in a Man. Our task is to follow him, no matter what the cost, and to lead others to do the same.

This week's column is excerpted from "Wisdom. Christian Witness and the Year of Faith," remarks by Archbishop Chaput delivered at the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, Washington, D.C, on July 8.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Knights Of Peter Claver To Host National Convention In Philadelphia The 98th Annual National Convention Will Open With Mass At Cathedral Basilica Of Saints Peter And Paul

July 15, 2013

Knights of Peter Claver to Host National Convention in Philadelphia
The 98th Annual National Convention will open with Mass at Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul


The Knights of Peter Claver and its Ladies Auxiliary will host the 98th Annual National Convention the Catholic Fraternal Order July 19-24, 2013 in Philadelphia.

Bishop Timothy C. Senior will be the principal celebrant and homilist at the opening Mass. All are welcome to attend.

Sunday, July 21, 2013
2:00 p.m. (Opening Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


The convention will open on Monday, July 22nd at downtown Philadelphia Marriott. The Knights of Peter Claver have invited local civic officials to attend.

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Editor's Note: The Knights of Peter Claver, Inc. is the nation's only African-American Catholic fraternal order and the largest historically black Catholic organization in the world. The Order is named after Saint Peter Claver, a Jesuit priest from Spain who ministered to African slaves in Cartagena, Colombia during the 1600s. The Knights of Peter Claver operates in 72 Catholic Dioceses in the United States and South America. For more information on the Knights of Peter Claver, please visit www.kofpc.org.


Contact
Annie Korp
Communications Assistant
215-587-3747

Two Archdiocesan Elementary School Students Named National Ambassadors After Winning "do The Write Thing" Essay Contest

July 16, 2013

TWO ARCHDIOCESAN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL STUDENTS
NAMED NATIONAL AMBASSADORS

AFTER WINNING "DO THE WRITE THING" ESSAY CONTEST


Two elementary school students from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will represent the City of Philadelphia as National Ambassadors in Washington, D.C. after recently winning the "Do the Write Thing, Stop the Violence" Essay Contest. The Honorable Paul P. Panepinto, is the Pennsylvania State Chair for the "Do the Write Thing, Stop the Violence Challenge." The essay winners are Sabratini Simeon, 8th grade student at St. Cecilia Parish Elementary School in Philadelphia and Vincent Harvey, 7th grade student from Our Lady of Hope Regional Catholic School, also in Philadelphia.

The students will travel to Washington, D.C. for "National Recognition Week" activities being held during the week of July 20th. An awards dinner was held locally for the students in Philadelphia on Monday, June 3, 2013 to honor their work.

Sabratini and Vincent's essays were chosen from entries submitted by Catholic, charter and public school students throughout the city. They were asked to compose an essay on the topic of violence and its impact on society. Sabratini wrote her essay on "youth violence" and bullying. Vincent chose to write about those who work to combat violence in their local communities. On the Archdiocesan level the essay contest was used as a cross curricular activity involving Religion, English Language Arts and Social Studies.


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Editor's Note: For more information on Catholic Schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia please visit http://www.catholicschools-phl.org/.


Contact
Bonnie Olinger
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

>Middle School Students Win $10,000 Grant To Develop Anti-cyber Bullying Campaign Catholic Social Services Out Of School Time Programs Teaching Cyber Safety In Summer Camp

July 18, 2013

Middle School Students Win $10,000 Grant
to Develop Anti-Cyber Bullying Campaign

Catholic Social Services Out of School Time Programs
Teaching Cyber Safety in Summer Camp



Two Catholic Social Services Out of School Time (OST) Programs for middle school students were recently awarded a $10,000 grant to support their Cyber Cadets Summer Workshop, an anti-bullying, community-building campaign developed and led by the very youth who will participate in the program. Fifty students enrolled in OST Summer Camp Programs at St. Martin de Porres in North Philadelphia and DePaul School in Germantown will work to find common ground, with the goal of bringing youth from very different neighborhoods together for a united purpose - to promote cyber safety.

The grant was awarded through Project: Connect Summer Youth Programming Competition, a national effort recognizing non-profit organizations for innovative programming that maximizes learning by making "the online experience" for young people one that is more civic, safe, and empowering. This project is funded by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.

"The competition this year is designed to engage young people in solving a real-world challenge - making the Internet a safer and more powerful place to advance learning," said Connie Yowell, Director of Education at the MacArthur Foundation. "The ability to meet that challenge will help determine whether education will be more relevant to both young people and the economy where they will be eventually looking for work."

Over eight weeks this summer, participating students will work collaboratively online using Google Docs, Skype, and KidBlog.org to create and share an anti-cyber bullying message with peers in hopes of promoting change within their communities. Students will learn how to make a Public Service Announcement video, develop print campaign materials, design web content, and maintain social media components that send an anti-bullying message. Joint social activities throughout the summer include a "Meet and Greet" Barbecue, fieldtrip to iPlay America, Scavenger Hunts, and Youth Dance, all focused on putting anti-bullying efforts into practice.

OST Programs Education Coordinator Kate McDowell comments, "It is vitally important today for staff leading our youth to be aware that digital media is the pulse fueling the interests of our children. It is our responsibility as educators and mentors to help kids develop proper etiquette for communicating and collaborating online. We are pleased to receive the funding to help our staff to do just that."

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Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocesan Youth To Depart For World Youth Day Pilgrimage In Rio De Janeiro They Will Join Pope Francis On His First Visit International Visit As The Holy Father

July 19, 2013

ARCHDIOCESAN YOUTH TO DEPART FOR
WORLD YOUTH DAY PILGRIMAGE IN RIO DE JANEIRO

They will join Pope Francis on his first visit international visit as the Holy Father


A delegation of youth and young adults from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will depart on a pilgrimage to Brazil that focuses on World Youth Day (WYD) with Pope Francis in Rio de Janeiro from July 23-28, 2013. This will be Pope Francis' first appearance at World Youth Day as the Holy Father.

Young people from parishes throughout the Philadelphia area will attend WYD, 20 of whom will also visit the Basilica of Our Lady of Aparecida, patroness of Brazil. This Basilica is the fourth most popular Marian shrine in the world. More than 9,500 young people from the United States are expected to attend WYD. Local participation is being coordinated by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia's Office for Catechetical Formation.

Photo Opportunity: Pilgrims departing for World Youth Day

Monday, July 22, 2013
Approximate departure time- 12:00 p.m.
Saint David Church
316 North Easton Road
Willow Grove, PA 19090


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, OFM Cap. will gather with the Philadelphia contingency at the United States Gathering on July 24th at the Vivo Veranda in Rio de Janeiro.

World Youth Day (WYD) is a gathering of Catholic youth with the Holy Father, established by Pope John Paul II in 1985. It is celebrated annually in Rome at the diocesan level on Palm Sunday and at a week-long event international every two to three years.

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Editor's Notes: Elizabeth Riordan from the Office for Catechetical Formation will be available for interviews while on the Pilgrimage. To arrange an interview, please contact the Office for Communications at 215-587-3747.
Follow the Philadelphia pilgrims on Facebook by visiting: Philly-Catholic-Youth-Young-Adult-Ministry/185808491583742

For more information on World Youth Day, please visit its official website at rio2013.com/en.


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Representatives From White House, Usda To Visit Archdiocesan Summer Meals Program Site

July 23, 2013

REPRESENTATIVES FROM WHITE HOUSE, USDA TO VISIT
ARCHDIOCESAN SUMMER MEALS PROGRAM SITE


Nutritional Development Services (NDS) of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will host representatives from the White House, the USDA and the University of Pennsylvania at one of their Summer Meals Program sites.

Tuesday July 23, 2013
11:00 a.m.
Salvation Army, The Learning Zone
1340 Brown Street
Philadelphia, PA 19123


Melissa Rogers, Director of the White House Office of Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships, and Norah Deluhery, Director of the U.S. Department of Agriculture Center for Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships, will be joined by Dr. John Dilulio and Mr. Joseph Tierney of the Fox Leadership Program at the University of Pennsylvania as they tour the Learning Zone, a summer enrichment program located at the Salvation Army which serves lunch and snacks free of charge to 110 children ages 18 and younger daily.

The visit will provide an opportunity to discuss some of the challenges that NDS faces in providing summer meals throughout the Greater Philadelphia area and ways to improve the program.

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Editor's Note: The NDS Summer Meals program is a federally funded child nutrition program that provides a nutritious lunch and snack each day. Last year NDS served 873,000 meals at 468 sites in the five county area. To learn more please visit http://www.ndsarch.org/.


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Advisory Council For Elementary Education Works To Sustain And Grow Catholic Schools In Chester County

July 23, 2013

Advisory Council for Elementary Education Works to
Sustain and Grow Catholic Schools in Chester County


The Advisory Council for Elementary Education in Chester County has been working for the last 4 months to provide strategic planning, institutional advancement, professional development and advancing opportunities for Catholic Education at the local county level. The Chester County council, which was originally formed four years ago and re-launched in late February 2013, is the model for four other County Advisory Councils (Bucks, Delaware, Montgomery and Philadelphia) being established in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. The Advisory Council in Chester County was re-launched in response to recommendations from the Blue Ribbon Commission and was created to better assist the 15 local elementary and regional schools with strategic planning, marketing, enrollment and governance to help sustain, grow, and strengthen their schools.

The 20 member Chester County council includes principals, pastors, parents, two Catholic University representatives and several local business leaders. Council members are selected based upon recommendations made to Bishop John J. McIntyre, who is responsible for overseeing the Chester County region.

The Chester County Advisory Council makes recommendations to the Archdiocesan Executive Board of Elementary Education regarding Chester County Catholic Schools.

In addition, the council is also responsible for the creation and maintenance of The Foundation for Catholic Education in Chester County, a county educational foundation, which includes the establishment and maintenance of a tuition assistance program and gathering financial support from local businesses through the Educational Improvement Tax Credits and other education related State and Federal Funding. The Foundation for Catholic Education in Chester County also sponsors a Hall of Fame Gala held each October. The Foundation selects Hall of Fame inductees who have made significant contributions to Catholic Education in Chester County through their time, talent and dedication.

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Editor's Note: To learn more about The Foundation for Catholic Education in Chester County visit www.Foundationforcatholiceducation.org.

For more information on Catholic Schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia please visit http://www.catholicschools-phl.org/.


Contact
Bonnie Olinger
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia To Join Catholic Charities Usa For Annual Partners In Excellence Regional Gathering Over 300 Catholic Charities Staff, Board, And Volunteers Meet For Spiritual And Professional Development

July 26, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA TO JOIN
CATHOLIC CHARITIES USA FOR ANNUAL
PARTNERS IN EXCELLENCE REGIONAL GATHERING

Over 300 Catholic Charities Staff, Board, and Volunteers Meet for
Spiritual and Professional Development


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia will join Catholic Charities USA (CCUSA) in their Partners in Excellence Regional Conference in Philadelphia on July 29th and 30th gathering over 300 members of the Catholic Charities family for workshops on mission, connection, and professional development.

The Partners in Excellence series seeks to connect all levels of the Catholic Charities family: CCUSA leadership, board members, heads of local Catholic Charities agencies, and volunteers. Specifically, it will provide an opportunity for reflection upon both the spiritual and practical role of Catholic Charities in the fight against poverty.

"As the largest program of its kind to date, the convening of the Partners in Excellence in Philadelphia allows the Catholic Charities family to come together to combine national advocacy with local outreach" said Fr. Snyder, President of Catholic Charities USA. "We are called to be one church, united in faith, with a dedication to social justice not only on a local, community-wide level but also on a national one as well."

In addition to presentations from CCUSA leadership, the program will include numerous workshops and breakout sessions. Presenters include members of the CCUSA team as well as Catholic Social Services, Nutritional Development Services, and Catholic Health Care Services and will allow for a more thorough and in-depth analysis of pressing issues facing Catholic Charities, including advocacy, immigration reform, youth mentoring, disaster awareness, senior services, and housing for veterans.

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Editor's Note: Catholic Charities USA is the national office for Catholic Charities agencies nationwide. Catholic Charities USA's members provide help and create hope for more than 10 million people a year regardless of their religious, social, or economic background. To learn more about CCUSA, please visit www.catholiccharitiesusa.org.


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Catholic Social Services And Philadelphia Veterans Outreach Center Receive $1 Million Grant To Help End Veteran Homelessness The Supportive Services For Veteran Families Program Awarded $300 Million Nationwide

July 26, 2013

CATHOLIC SOCIAL SERVICES AND PHILADELPHIA VETERANS OUTREACH CENTER RECEIVE $1 MILLION GRANT
TO HELP END VETERAN HOMELESSNESS

The Supportive Services for Veteran Families program awarded $300 million nationwide


Catholic Social Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia (CSS) and the Philadelphia Veterans Multi-Service & Education Center (PVMSEC) will share a one million dollar grant awarded through the US Department of Veterans Affairs' Supportive Services for Veterans Families program to help target homeless and at-risk veterans and their families.

Over the next year, CSS and PVMSEC intend to use the $1,007,000 grant to create a coordinated system in Chester County to prevent homelessness or rapidly re-house veteran families in transition from homelessness. The partnership will combine expertise and leverage resources and relationships to provide access to permanent supportive housing settings for homeless veterans as well as assistance with temporary financial assistance, related case management and support services. Approximately 150 participating veteran households in Chester County will be served through this new program.

"We are very excited about this collaborative partnership with the Philadelphia Veterans Multi-Service & Educational Center, a well-respected leader and champion in our region providing comprehensive services and support to veterans," said Amy Stoner, Director of CSS Community Based Services. "We will now be able to fill a great need in Chester County to provide services that will offer veterans and their families housing stability and resources to achieve self-sufficiency. CSS is very pleased to resume a strong presence in Coatesville, and our partnerships with other provider agencies. It is an honor to be able to serve those who have dedicated their lives to serve our country so well and sacrificed so much on our behalf."

Under the Supportive Services for Veteran Families (SSVF) program, VA awarded nearly $300 million in grants to private nonprofit organizations that provide services to very low-income veteran families living in - or transitioning to - permanent housing. This is the third year SSVF grants have helped veterans and their families find or remain in their homes. Last year, VA provided about $100 million to assist approximately 50,000 veterans and family members.

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Editor's Note: For more information on Catholic Social Services, please visit http://www.catholicsocialservicesphilly.org/


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Local Women To Depart To Washington, D.C. To Attend "women Speak For Themselves" Rally Group To Gather Across From The White House At Lafayette Park

July 30, 2013

LOCAL WOMEN TO DEPART TO WASHINGTON, D.C.
TO ATTEND "WOMEN SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES" RALLY

Group to gather across from the White House at Lafayette Park


Women from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will join the group Women Speak for Themselves (WSFT) to demonstrate against the HHS Contraception and Abortion Mandate in Lafayette Square in Washington, D.C., on August 1, 2013 from 11:30 p.m. to 12:20 p.m.

They will depart from Saint Matthias Church in Bala Cynwyd.

Thursday, August 1, 2013
Approximate departure time- 8:00 a.m.
Saint Matthias Church
128 Bryn Mawr Avenue
Bala Cynwyd, PA 19004 (Montgomery County)


The nearly hour long demonstration will be led by Dr. Helen Alvaré, George Mason Law Professor and WSFT founder, and will include speeches from women members of WSFT who are traveling to Washington, D.C. for the event. Following the event, members of WSFT hope to meet with members of Congress.

The HHS Mandate requires religious individuals and institutions to insure, without any co-pay, contraception and some drugs which can act as early abortifacients. It was scheduled to go into effect August 1, 2013; but a final rule has pushed the date back to January 1, 2014.

WSFT is a grassroots coalition of more than 40,000 women from many religions, political backgrounds, and states, who stand for religious freedom and against the simplistic notion that women's freedom is grounded in contraception and abortion.

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Editor's Notes: For more information please contact Meghan Cokeley, Director of the Office for the New Evangelization
at 215-587-5630.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Security, Immigration Reform And Human Dignity

August 7, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
SECURITY, IMMIGRATION REFORM AND HUMAN DIGNITY


Americans have a right to secure borders, especially in an era of anti-American violence. We have a right to reasonably regulate our immigration policies. We have a right to exclude criminals from our country and to protect the financial health of our public institutions and services. We have a right to verify foreign visitors and guest workers, and to expect their compliance with the law.

But most undocumented immigrants in the United States - the vast majority -- never commit a violent act, have no desire to undermine the common good and contribute productively to American prosperity. Thousands of farmers and businessmen rely on their services. The life many of us enjoy depends, in part, on the labor of "illegals." Taking advantage of their work, and then blaming them for being here, is a uniquely unworthy form of doublethink.

For Catholics - who belong to a Church that supports the fundamental right of every person to migrate to seek a better life for his or her family, and who themselves were disdained as "outsiders" for much of American history - anti-immigrant resentment is especially wrong.

The United States has a right to press for the kind of legal and economic reforms in Latin America and elsewhere that would help stabilize the flow of workers back and forth across our borders. Hypocrisy in the immigration debate is not a monopoly of the north side of the Rio Grande.

But we're not licensed to mistreat anyone in our midst, whether they have papers or not. People derive their human dignity and their rights from the God who created us all - whether others find their presence convenient or not. We need to remember that in the months ahead.

The U.S. Catholic bishops, along with millions of fellow American Catholics, seek reasonable legislation that will offer undocumented persons a path to citizenship and promote family unity. Specifically, the bishops hope for the following elements in any immigration reform bill:

First, a path to citizenship for undocumented workers that's fair, accessible and achievable in a reasonable timeframe. Second, reform of the family-based immigration system to reunite husbands, wives and children in a more rapid manner. Third, a program that would allow low-skilled migrant workers to enter the United States legally as needed labor. Fourth, due process protections for immigrants. And fifth, policies which at least begin to address the root causes of migration, such as economic inequities and persecution.

Congress adjourned for summer recess on August 2. It won't reconvene until September 9. The Senate passed a major immigration reform bill (S. 744) on June 27, by a vote of 68-32. The House of Representatives will likely take up the issue in September or October. Unfortunately, some House members have committed themselves to blocking almost any serious new reform legislation. That would be more than a political error. It would be a bitter human tragedy.

Immigration is an issue where committed Catholics can legitimately disagree. But real reform of our immigration laws is long overdue. We need to act now. And the five key legislative elements sought by America's bishops make good economic, political and human sense.

During these weeks of summer recess, I ask Catholics across our archdiocese to consider and pray about the immigration issue. And I hope many of us will contact our federal representatives to press them to vote for the kind of deep immigration reform we so urgently need.

Contact information for Pennsylvania congresspersons can be found through the Pennsylvania Catholic Conference at https://www.votervoice.net/PACC/Address.

The national "Justice for Immigrants" campaign seeks to inform the general public, and especially Catholics, about the ways immigrants benefit the nation; to advocate changes in immigration law and policies; and to organize networks to assist immigrants with legal problems. The campaign's website can be found at: http://www.justiceforimmigrants.org/index.shtml


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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Mr. Francis E. Fox Named New President Of Archbishop John Carroll High School

August 9, 2013

Mr. Francis E. Fox Named New President of
Archbishop John Carroll High School


The Office of Catholic Education (OCE) and the Faith in the Future Foundation are pleased to announce the appointment of Mr. Francis E. Fox as the 5th President of Archbishop John Carroll High School in Delaware County. Mr. Fox is a proud graduate of Archbishop Carroll, Class of 1977. He has served on Archbishop Carroll's advisory board since 1997 and was the chairman of that body from 2000-2011.

Mr. Fox said, "It is with great humility and excitement that I accept the position of President of Archbishop John Carroll High School. My decision to serve was certainly based on my love for the school and previous years of involvement on the Board. In an equally important way, it was also influenced by, the recent appointment of Chris Mominey as Chief Operating Officer at the Office of Catholic Education and the creation of the Faith in the Future Foundation. Carroll has felt their support and empowerment over the past several months, and I believe now is the perfect time to offer my expertise and professional skills to the Archdiocese and Archbishop Carroll on a full-time basis."

Mr. Fox brings over 30 years of leadership experience to Archbishop Carroll. In 1995, he founded Fox Commercial Real Estate Services, Inc., a full service development, brokerage and property management company. He also served as consultant to the City of Hercules, California during the disposition of a city owned $200 Million redevelopment portfolio, which included retail, multi-family, residential and industrial properties. Most recently, Mr. Fox was associated with Newmark Grubb Knight Frank, a global real estate service firm, as Senior Managing Director of its Philadelphia regional industrial team.

Christopher Mominey, the new Chief Operating Officer and Secretary for Catholic Education for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia said of the appointment, "21st century Catholic schools need strong executive leadership coupled with committed board members who can articulate a strategic vision. In Frank Fox we have found both qualities. As a long-time board member, business leader and as a member of the Class of 1977, Frank brings a wealth of knowledge, passion and dedication to the Carroll community. The role of the President in a Catholic high school is critical to the success of fund development, alumni engagement, and community relations. Without a doubt, Frank will be an example to all of our stakeholders at Carroll, and beyond, that we are serious about the growth and sustainability of Catholic education here in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia."

Mr. Fox holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Marketing and Management from Saint Joseph's University in Philadelphia. He is a parishioner of Saint Denis Parish in Havertown, Delaware County.

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Editor's Note: For information about Catholic Schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, please visit www.catholicschools-phl.org.

For information about the Faith in the Future Foundation please visit www.faithinthefuture.com/splash/


Contact
Bonnie Olinger
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Seminarians Move-in To Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary To Kick-off 2013-2014 Academic Year

August 13, 2013

SEMINARIANS MOVE-IN TO SAINT CHARLES BORROMEO SEMINARY
TO KICK-OFF 2013-2014 ACADEMIC YEAR


The College and Theology Division seminarians of Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary will return to campus to mark the start of the academic year on Tuesday, August 20th beginning with registration and moving-in to the dorms. This fall, over 40 new men will be entering Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary for 2013-2014 for the first time from approximately 9 Dioceses and Religious Orders, including approximately 8 men from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

Tuesday, August 20, 2013
9:00 a.m. - 10:15 a.m.
Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary
College Building, Center House
100 East Wynnewood Road
Wynnewood, PA 19096


Opening week at the seminary will include campus tours, in which returning seminarians will pair with new seminarians and their families to tour the grounds and facilities. In addition, during the first week, group activities such as day trips to Philadelphia and daily Mass are also planned. Fall classes for the College and Theology Division of Saint Charles Borromeo officially begin on Thursday, August 22, 2013.

Founded in 1832, Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary has been forming young men for priestly service to the community for more than 180 years. This year, approximately 150 young men have answered God's call to attend the Seminary to be formed after the heart of Jesus Christ. With the generosity of many, these young seminarians are able to successfully transform into the compassionate and loyal priests and inspiring leaders of tomorrow's Church.


# # #


Editor's Note: For more information on Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary please visit http://www.scs.edu/.



Contact
Bonnie Olinger
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Announces Plans To Market Nursing Homes For Potential Sale And Seek Outsourced Management Agreement For Catholic Cemeteries These Potential Actions Follow The Recent Release Of The Archdiocesan Financial Report And Seek To Rebuild A Solid Financial Foundation For The Church Of Philadelphia

August 20, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE ANNOUNCES PLANS TO MARKET
NURSING HOMES FOR POTENTIAL SALE AND SEEK OUTSOURCED MANAGEMENT AGREEMENT FOR
CATHOLIC CEMETERIES

These potential actions follow the recent release of the Archdiocesan financial report and seek to rebuild a solid financial foundation for the Church of Philadelphia


Contextual Background

This July, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia published audited financial statements for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012. The financial statements disclosed a $39.2 million operating deficit for that period as well as several very significant and ongoing balance sheet issues that measure in the hundreds of millions of dollars.

Since his arrival in Philadelphia nearly two years ago, Archbishop Chaput has repeatedly expressed his commitment to financial transparency and prudent stewardship of the resources of the Archdiocese. Beginning last summer, a series of steps were taken to begin to remedy Archdiocesan fiscal challenges. The Archbishop's residence along with a property in Ventnor, New Jersey, were both sold to provide necessary immediate cash flow. Many other actions followed including a reduction of 25% of the workforce at the Archdiocesan Pastoral Center in order to stem the operating deficit. Additionally, an evaluation of various Archdiocesan real estate assets and operating entities was undertaken. This evaluation focused on assets that could potentially be used to remedy the balance sheet issues. None of those measures were taken lightly, but all were essential to maintaining the presence of the Catholic Church in the Philadelphia region and the good works accomplished through its various ministries.

Background Regarding Today's Announcement

Among the operating entities evaluated were Catholic Health Care Services and the Office of Catholic Cemeteries, which have both been well managed for many years. As a result, Archbishop Chaput has decided to market the six nursing homes and one assisted living facility operated by Catholic Health Care Services for potential sale. He has also decided to pursue a possible outsourced management and leasing agreement for the 11 active Archdiocesan cemeteries and two sites designated for future cemetery development.

In making this announcement, Archbishop Chaput said, "Our difficult financial situation must be addressed and the actions that we need to take may be painful ones. I understand this fact fully, but it is of critical importance that we rebuild our financial foundation so that we can continue our collective good works.

None of the decisions I have made about our finances thus far were made lightly. They have all come after much careful discernment and prayer as well as significant discussion and consultation. In the end, any final decisions about our nursing homes and cemeteries will be mine. They'll be made with full and due consideration to the mission of our local Church and all those who would be affected."

Background Regarding the Potential Sale of Catholic Health Care Services


Founded in 1913, Catholic Health Care Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia is the seventh largest faith-based provider of skilled nursing and assisted living care in the country with a total occupancy of just over 1,400 beds. In addition to the services noted above, it also provides adult day care, rehabilitation therapy, memory support, affordable housing, community support outreach and end-of-life care programs. The system currently has approximately 1,100 full-time and 950 part-time employees.

A condition to any possible sale would be the retention of all current nursing home residents regardless of their payor status. Every effort will be made to ensure continued employment for all those currently working within the system. Employees were provided with information regarding the marketing of Catholic Health Care Services at meetings today. Written follow up communication will also be sent to them. A letter has also been sent to the families of all of our current residents.

The following is a list of the facilities being marketed for potential sale: Immaculate Mary Home, Philadelphia; Villa Saint Martha, Downingtown (Chester County); Saint Francis Country House, Darby (Delaware County); Saint John Neumann Home, Philadelphia; Saint Martha Manor, Downingtown (Chester County); Saint Mary Manor, Lansdale (Montgomery County); and Saint Monica Manor, Philadelphia.

Background Regarding the Pursuit of an Outsourced Management Agreement for Catholic Cemeteries

Founded in 1849, the Catholic Cemeteries Office of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia operates 11 cemeteries located in Chester, Delaware, Bucks, Montgomery and Philadelphia counties. It also owns two land parcels that have been designated for future use. One is in Bucks County. The other is in Chester County. Last year, it conducted nearly 6,900 committals. It is staffed by approximately 160 full-time and approximately 30 seasonal employees in its central office at the Archdiocesan Pastoral Center and at individual cemeteries.

It is important to note that the cemeteries will not be sold. Any potential arrangement would result in the Archdiocese retaining ownership while outsourcing management and operations, which would still be conducted in a manner consistent with Catholic values and the core mission of the cemeteries. Parish cemeteries would not be affected as they are operated at the local level. Every effort will also be made to ensure continued employment for those currently working within the system. Employees were provided with information regarding the pursuit of a possible outsourced management agreement at meetings today. Written follow up communication will also be distributed to them. All priests of the Archdiocese as well as funeral directors with whom the Catholic cemeteries work are also being informed.

The following is a list of cemeteries that would be affected by a potential outsourced management agreement: All Souls Cemetery, Coatesville (Chester County); Calvary Cemetery, West Conshohocken (Montgomery County); Cathedral Cemetery, Philadelphia; New Cathedral Cemetery, Philadelphia; Holy Cross Cemetery, Yeadon (Delaware County); Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, Philadelphia; Immaculate Heart of Mary Cemetery, Linwood (Delaware County); Resurrection Cemetery, Bensalem (Bucks County); Saint John Neumann Cemetery, Chalfont (Bucks County); Saint Michael Cemetery, Chester (Delaware County); and Saints Peter and Paul Cemetery, Springfield (Delaware County). Additionally, All Saints Cemetery, Newtown (Bucks County) and Holy Savior Cemetery, Penn Township (Bucks County) are not currently active cemeteries, but sites designated for future use. They would also be affected.

When final decisions are made regarding both Catholic Health Care Services and the Catholic Cemeteries Office, appropriate announcements will be made to employees, other stakeholders and the general public.

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Editor's Note: To view the financial reports released by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia in July, please visit www.CatholicPhilly.com.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Office Depot Foundation To Donate Sackpacks To Archdiocesan Schools

August 21, 2013

OFFICE DEPOT FOUNDATION TO DONATE SACKPACKS TO ARCHDIOCESAN SCHOOLS


The independent, nonprofit Office Depot Foundation is donating 400 sackpacks to two Archdiocesan elementary schools as part of their National Backpack Program. This year students from Saint Francis of Assisi School in Norristown and Visitation B.V.M. School in Philadelphia will be receiving the sackpacks containing essential schools supplies at the Back-to-School Celebration.

Wednesday, August 21, 2013
3:30 p.m.
Office Depot Store
2400 Chemical Road
Plymouth Meeting, PA 19462


Superintendent for Elementary Schools Jacqueline Coccia and students from each of the schools will be presented with the sackpacks at the event. The school year begins on Wednesday, September 4, 2013 for students who attend the 123 elementary schools, 17 high schools and four schools of special education of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

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Editor's Note: For information about Catholic Schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, please visit www.catholicschools-phl.org.

More information about the National Backpack Program can be found on the Office Depot Foundation's Facebook page at www.facebook.com/officedepotfoundation. To learn more about the Office Depot Foundation and its initiatives, go to www.officedepotfoundation.org/.


Contact
Annie Korp
Communications Assistant
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Students Go Back To School For 2013-2014 Academic Year

August 28, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA STUDENTS
GO BACK TO SCHOOL FOR 2013-2014 ACADEMIC YEAR


The 2013-2014 school year begins on Wednesday, September 4, 2013 for students who attend the 123 elementary schools, 17 high schools and four schools of special education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

This academic year begins on the heels of several key announcements including the hiring of Mr. Christopher Mominey as Chief Operating Officer and Secretary of Catholic Education for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, the official designation of 14 Independent Mission Schools and the formation of an Executive Board of Elementary Education.

Back-to-School Events in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia


Several back-to-school events at Archdiocesan high schools, elementary schools and schools of special education are planned including:

Wednesday, September 4, 2013 at 10:00 a.m.
Classroom Blessing of Special Education Students by Bishop Daniel Thomas
Saint Katherine Day School, 930 Bowman Avenue; Wynnewood, PA 19096 (Montgomery County)

Bishop Daniel Thomas will offer a classroom blessing to students and staff for the start of the 2013-2014 school year at the main school site in Wynnewood (Montgomery County). Mr. Christopher Mominey, Chief Operating Officer and Secretary of Catholic Education and Ms. Jacqueline Coccia, Superintendent of Elementary Schools, will also attend the blessing and greet students and staff.

Saint Katherine Day School is a Special Education school for Mentally & Physically Challenged & Developmentally Delayed Students ages 4 ½ to 21.

Thursday, September 5, 2013 at 2:30 p.m.
Signing of Collaborative educational partnership between Saint Hubert High School and Holy Family University
Saint Hubert Catholic High School for Girls, 7320 Torresdale Ave., Philadelphia, PA 19136

Administrators from Saint Hubert Catholic High School for Girls will be joined by officials from the Office of Catholic Education and Holy Family University to sign an agreement that enters both schools into a collaborative educational partnership. The agreement consists of three components, including admissions and scholarship, a university and dual credit agreement, and continuing education opportunities.

The partnership document will be signed by Mr. Francis Farrell, President of Saint Hubert High School; Dr. Joanne Walls, Principal of Saint Hubert High School; Dr. Carol Cary, Superintendent for Secondary Schools; Sister Francesca Onley, CSFN, Ph.D., President of Holy Family University; Sister Maureen McGarrity, CSFN, Ph.D., Provost Holy Family University, and Dr. Michael Markowitz, Vice President of Academic Affairs Holy Family University.

Friday, September 6, 2013: at 9:30 a.m.
Opening Mass for Cardinal John Foley Regional School
Saint Denis Church, 2401 Saint Denis Lane, Havertown, PA 19083 (Delaware County)

Bishop John McIntyre will be the celebrant and homilist at the opening school Mass for Cardinal John Foley Regional Catholic School. Mr. Christopher Mominey, Chief Operating Officer and Secretary of Catholic Education and Ms. Jacqueline Coccia, Superintendent of Elementary Schools will attend Mass with Cardinal Foley students, faculty and staff. The 2013-2014 school year marks Cardinal John Foley Regional Catholic School's second year as a regional school formed by the merger of Saint Denis and Annunciation B.V.M. schools in Havertown (Delaware County) in 2012. Rev. Kevin J. Gallagher, Pastor of Saint Denis Parish and Rev. James Cox, Pastor of Annunciation B.V.M. Parish were appointed pastors of their respective Parishes this past spring 2013.

Tuesday, September 10, 2013 at 8:00 a.m.
Mayor Nutter visit in Celebration of Mayor's Education Month at West Catholic Preparatory High School
West Catholic Preparatory High School, 4501 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19139

In celebration of the Mayor's Education Month, The Honorable Michael A. Nutter, Mayor of Philadelphia, Bishop Michael Fitzgerald, Mr. Christopher Mominey, Chief Operating Officer and Secretary of Catholic Education, Mr. Samuel Casey Carter, Chief Executive Officer Faith in the Future Foundation and Dr. Carol A. Cary, Superintendent of Secondary Schools, will visit West Catholic and participate in the presentation of the school's new flag reflecting West Catholic Preparatory High School's updated name. Mayor Nutter and Chris Mominey will also briefly address the student body. Following the presentation, Mayor Nutter, and Dr. Cary will take a tour of the school and visit with students in several classrooms.


Recent Major Announcements Regarding Catholic Education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia


New Chief Operating Officer and Secretary of Catholic Education Announcement:
On May 23, 2013 the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and the Faith in the Future Foundation, announced the appointment of Mr. Christopher Mominey as the new Chief Operating Officer and Secretary for Catholic Education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, effective July 1, 2013.

Mr. Mominey came to the Archdiocese of Philadelphia after 17 years of education related roles in the Diocese of Syracuse. Most recently he was the Superintendent of Schools for the Diocese of Syracuse.

Mr. Mominey is a highly-respected Catholic school administrator and passionate advocate of the Church, whose appointment marked an important milestone for Catholic Schools in the Archdiocese and the implementation of the Foundation's strategic vision to strengthen and grow Catholic schools across the Philadelphia region.

Independence Mission Schools Announcement:
At a press conference on July 15, 2013 Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. joined Mr. Brian McElwee, Chairman of the Independence Mission Schools (IMS), and Mr. Al Cavalli, President of IMS, to announce that 14 Catholic elementary schools were officially designated operationally independent of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia allowing them to form the Independence Mission Schools system.

IMS is the umbrella organization overseeing these 14 independent private Catholic schools, which provides central staff to drive development and enrollment as well as standardized business practices and management of the school facilities.

Formation of Executive Board of Elementary Education and Five County Advisory Councils:
In February 2013 the Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced the creation of an Executive Board of Elementary Education. This entity was formed in response to recommendations from the Blue Ribbon Commission and was created to better assist local pastors, parishes, elementary and regional schools with strategic planning, marketing, enrollment and governance to help sustain, grow, and strengthen their schools.

In addition to the Executive Board, Advisory Councils for elementary education are being created in each of the surrounding five counties.

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Editor's Note: For more information about schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia please visit
www.catholicschools-phl.org.


Contact
Bonnie Olinger
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Confirmation Schedule - Fall 2013

August 28, 2013

Confirmation Schedule - Fall 2013
(As of August 27, 2013 - subject to change)


CELEBRANT: ARCHBISHOP CHARLES J. CHAPUT, O.F.M. CAP.

Thursday, November 7, 2013 at 6:00 PM, Saint Bernard, Philadelphia
Thursday, November 21, 2013 at 6:00PM, Our Lady of Charity, Brookhaven
Saturday, November 23, 2013 at 10:00 AM, Saint William, Philadelphia
Friday, December 13, 2013 at 6:30 PM, Saint Thomas Aquinas, Croydon

CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND DANIEL E. THOMAS
(Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia)

Monday, October 21, 2013 at 4:00 PM, Saint Helena, Philadelphia
Thursday, October 24, 2013 at 4:00 PM, Christ the King, Philadelphia
Saturday, October 26, 2013 at 10:00 AM, Corpus Christi, Lansdale
Sunday, October 27, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Saint Cyprian, Philadelphia
Sunday, November 24, 2013 at 12:00 Noon, Saint Martha, Philadelphia
Wednesday, December 4, 2013 at 4:00 PM, Saint Denis, Havertown
Thursday, December 5, 2013 at 4:00 PM, Annunciation B.V.M., Havertown
Saturday, December 7, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Saint Martin of Tours, New Hope



CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND TIMOTHY C. SENIOR
(Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia)

Thursday, November 14, 2013 at 4:00 PM, Saint Gabriel, Norwood
Saturday, November 16, 2013 at 10:00 AM, Saint Mary Magdalen, Media
Saturday, November 23, 2013 at 10:00 AM, Saint Dorothy, Drexel Hill
Sunday, November 24, 2013 at 11:30 AM, Our Lady of Peace, Milmont Park
Sunday, December 1, 2013 at 4:00 PM, Saint Jude, Chalfont
Thursday, December 5, 2013 at 5:00 PM, Notre Dame de Lourdes, Swarthmore
Saturday, December 7, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Saint Patrick, Malvern

CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND JOHN J. MCINTYRE
(Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia)

Monday, October 21, 2013 at 4:30 PM, Saint Margaret, Narberth
Monday, November 4, 2013 at 4:00 PM, Saint George, Philadelphia
Thursday, November 7, 2013 at 4:00 PM, Saint Joseph, Ambler
Saturday, November 16, 2013 at 10:30 AM, Saint Catherine of Siena, Horsham
Monday, November 18, 2013 at 4:00 PM, Saint Anthony of Padua, Ambler
Thursday, November 21, 2013 at 4:00 PM, Saint Alphonsus, Maple Glen
Monday, November 25, 2013 at 4:00 AM, Saint Aloysius, Pottstown

CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND MICHAEL J. FITZGERALD
(Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia)

Sunday, October 6, 2013 at 10:30 AM, Saint Anne, Philadelphia
Monday, October 14, 2013 at 4:00 PM, Presentation B.V.M., Cheltenham
Saturday, October 19, 2013 at 10:30 AM and 1:30 PM, Saint Anastasis, Newtown Square
Sunday, October 20, 2013 at 10:00 AM, Saint Joseph, Cheltenham
Thursday, October 24, 2013 at 4:00 PM, Saint Kevin, Springfield
Saturday, October 26, 2013 at 9:00 AM and 12:00 Noon, Saint Ann, Phoenixville
Sunday, October 27, 2013 at 10:30 AM, Holy Martyrs, Oreland
Saturday, November 9, 2013 at 10:00 AM, Saint Madeline, Ridley Park
Sunday, November 24, 2013 at 12:00 Noon, Saint Isaac Jogues, Wayne

CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND ROBERT P. MAGINNIS
(Retired Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia)

Thursday, October 24, 2013 at 4:00 PM, Saint Anslem, Philadelphia
Sunday, November 10, 2013 at 10:00 AM, Sacred Heart, Swedesburg
Thursday, November 14, 2013 at 4:00 PM, Assumption B.V.M., West Grove
Saturday, November 16, 2013 at 10:00 AM, Our Lady of Perpetual Help, Morton
Tuesday, November 19, 2013 at 4:00 PM, Immaculate Heart of Mary, Philadelphia
Tuesday, December 3, 2013 at 4:00 PM, Saint Ephrem, Bensalem

CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND JOSEPH F. MARTINO
(Retired Bishop of Scranton)

Sunday, October 20, 2013 at 2:00 PM, Saint Thomas Aquinas, Philadelphia
Saturday, November 9, 2013 at 10:00 AM, Saint Francis de Sales, Lenni
Saturday, November 16, 2013 at 11:00 AM, Our Lady of Grace, Penndel
Sunday, November 17, 2013 at 10:30 AM, Mother of Divine Grace, Philadelphia
Saturday, November 23, 2013 at 10:00 AM and 1:00 PM, Our Lady of Calvary, Philadelphia
Sunday, November 24, 2013 at 3:00 PM, Saint Vincent de Paul, Richboro
Sunday, December 1, 2013 at 10:00 AM, Saint Martin de Porres, Philadelphia
Wednesday, December 11, 2013 at 5:00 PM, Holy Innocents, Philadelphia

CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND HERBERT A. BEVARD
(Bishop of Saint Thomas, Virgin Islands)

Saturday, October 26, 2013 at 10:00 AM and 2:00 PM, Sacred Heart, Oxford
Monday, October 28, 2013 at 4:30 PM, Saint John Bosco, Hatboro
Tuesday, October 29, 2013 at 7:00 PM, Old Saint Joseph, Philadelphia
Monday, November 4, 2013 at 4:00 PM, Holy Trinity, Morrisville
Tuesday, November 5, 2013 at 4:30 PM, Our Lady of Fatima, Secane
Wednesday, November 6, 2013 at 4:00 PM, Saint Dominic, Philadelphia
Thursday, November 7, 2013 at 5:00 PM, Queen of Peace, Ardsley
Friday, November 8, 2013 at 3:00 PM, Saint Michael the Archangel, Levittown


Contact
Annie Korp
Communications Assistant
215-587-3747

Catholic Charities Appeal Partners With The Philadelphia Phillies For Catholic Charities Night At Citizens Bank Park

August 29, 2013

CATHOLIC CHARITIES APPEAL PARTNERS WITH
THE PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES FOR
CATHOLIC CHARITIES NIGHT AT CITIZENS BANK PARK


For the first time ever the Catholic Charities Appeal (CCA) will partner with the Philadelphia Phillies for "Catholic Charities Night". A portion of the proceeds from tickets purchased through a dedicated link will go directly to the appeal.

Orders must be placed by September 13th. To purchase tickets to this game and support the Catholic Charities Appeal please visit www.phillies.com/catholiccharitiesnight.

Tuesday, September 17, 2013
7:05 p.m.
Citizens Bank Park
1 Citizens Bank Way
Philadelphia, PA19148


If 500 tickets are sold, CCA will have the opportunity to select representatives to throw out the first pitch and perform the National Anthem. Seating will be located in the Outfield (101-107) at $38 per ticket, Pavilion (201-207) at $30 per ticket, Pavilion Deck (306-310) at $28 per ticket and Pavilion Deck (301-305) at $20 per ticket.

# # #


Editor's Note: Every year, the Philadelphia Catholic Charities Appeal feeds, clothes, shelters, and educates more than 200,000 people across our region, regardless of their faith. Care is provided for the homeless, the elderly, disadvantaged youth and the developmentally delayed through more than 80 highly effective social service programs that build up the dignity of those served. To learn more about the Catholic Charities Appeal, visit http://catholiccharitiesappeal.org/.


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Catholic Charities Appeal Partners With The Philadelphia Phillies For Catholic Charities Night At Citizens Bank Park

August 30, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
WELCOMING STUDENTS AND UNDERSTANDING OUR MISSION


On September 4, tens of thousands of students across the Archdiocese of Philadelphia return to class for a new academic year in our 123 parish schools, 17 secondary schools and four schools for persons with special needs.  Philadelphia rightly claims one of the finest Catholic educational systems in North America.  Catholics across the archdiocese can take pride in its extraordinary achievements, which include, most recently, our 15 schools honored by the U.S. Department of Education for their “blue ribbon” excellence.

It’s a good moment to consider some history.

Catholic schools began in this country in the early 19th century, and Philadelphia played a leading role in their founding.  Catholics started them as an alternative to the public schools of the day, which taught a curriculum often critical of Catholic belief.  In many ways times have changed, but the mission of Catholic schools – quite properly – has remained.  The main purpose of Catholic schools is religious; in other words, to form students in Catholic faith, Catholic morality and Catholic social values. 

We place great importance on the academic excellence of our schools.  The reason is simple.  A strong, well-rounded academic education helps to create mature citizens who build up the wider community.  We also take great pride in our schools that exist as a service outreach in largely non-Catholic communities, welcoming students of every faith and no faith.  These schools too are a vital part of our mission.  In all of her social, spiritual and educational ministry, the Church seeks to benefit all persons of good will.  We’re grateful for our role in serving Philadelphia’s families; and we’re grateful to help cultivate the next generation of Philadelphia leaders – Catholic and non-Catholic alike.

Nonetheless, our schools exist primarily to develop the whole human person with an education shaped by Catholic faith, virtue and moral formation.  The goal of the Church, and by extension, the goal of all Catholic education, is to make disciples.

God renews the world with our actions, not our intentions. What separates real discipleship from surface piety is whether we actually do what we say we believe.

Our vocation as Christians is not simply to pass along good morals to our children, or to convey a sense of God’s hand in the world. These things are vital, of course; but they don’t exhaust our purpose for being here. Our mission is to bring the world to Jesus Christ, and to bring Jesus Christ to the world. Each of us is called to be a missionary at baptism, and our primary task is the conversion of our own hearts and the hearts of others, so that someday the whole world will acknowledge Jesus Christ as humanity’s savior and Lord.

That’s a big job. We can’t do it by just talking about it, any more than Christ could redeem us by writing an essay on sin. The Gospels have power because they tell the story of what God did; what his only Son did; and what Christ’s followers did. The Passion accounts of Christ’s suffering and death move us so deeply because they show in vivid detail how unashamedly God loves us.

This is the hot spark at the heart of every sincere attempt to tell the story of our redemption. God spared not even his own Son in saving us. It’s no wonder the cross draws the eye of great artists again and again down through the centuries. The cross reminds us that -- at least on one day in history -- love had no limits. And since then, everything has been different.  God built the Church we’ve inherited through the love of generations of believers. Their generosity and witness made our faith possible. It’s now our turn to shape the future by the zeal we bring to our own daily witness, especially with young people. It’s our turn to act. It’s our turn to live our Catholic faith with all the courage and strength Christ brought to loving the Church he founded.

The Church depends on God who will always protect her. But she also depends on you and me -- teachers, principals, pastors, deacons, catechists, parents and devoted single Catholics -- to carry Christ’s mission into the world.

On September 4, when the doors of our schools open, let’s remember to pray for the young people we’re privileged to educate.  And let’s also recall the reason our schools exist.  Each of these students is eternally precious and infinitely loved by God.  What they learn in our classrooms, they need to see lived with joy in our lives.  Words are important.  Actions are more important.  We need to live our Catholic faith as the apostles did; and through the young people that our witness forms, God will reshape the world.



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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Celebrate Annual Mass For Religious Jubilarians

September 3, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO CELEBRATE ANNUAL
MASS FOR RELIGIOUS JUBILARIANS


The Office for Consecrated Life of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia is pleased to announce this year's Annual Religious Jubilarian Mass honoring religious priests, sisters, and brothers celebrating milestone anniversaries of 25 years or more.

Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will be the main celebrant.

Sunday, September 8, 2013
11:00 a.m.
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Of this year's 253 jubilarians, 100 are expected to attend the mass with their guests. The 210 sisters, 37 priests and 6 religious brothers represent a combined 14,600 years of consecrated life. Included in this year's honorees are more than 40 religious men and women who have served 70 years or more.

# # #


Editor's Note: No multi-box feed will be provided. TV cameras and still photographers will be permitted inside the Cathedral.


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Responds To Pope Francis' Call For Day Of Fasting And Prayer For Peace In Syria

September 5, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE RESPONDS TO POPE FRANCIS' CALL FOR DAY
OF FASTING AND PRAYER FOR PEACE IN SYRIA


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has invited all people of goodwill to respond to Pope Francis' request to gather and pray for peace in Syria, the Middle East, and throughout the world at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul.

The Most Blessed Sacrament will be exposed for adoration and communal prayers for peace will be offered every hour.

Saturday, September 7, 2013
7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


September 7, 2013, the Vigil of the Nativity of the Blessed Virgin Mary, has been designated by the Holy Father as a universal day of fasting and prayer for peace in Syria, the Middle East and throughout the world. The Pope asks all local churches to gather in prayer and in a spirit of penance, asking God for the gift of peace in Syria and all places of conflict.

All Catholics in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia are encouraged to observe a personal fast day on Saturday, September 7, 2013. This fast may take the form of simple meals or no food in between meals or refraining from meals.

# # #


Editor's Notes: For more information on the Universal Day of Fasting and Prayer please visit the United States Catholic Bishops Conference at http://www.usccb.org/issues-and-action/human-life-and-dignity/global-issues/middle-east/syria/index.cfm.

To make a donation for relief efforts for Syrian refugees visit Catholic Relief Services at emergencies.crs.org.

No mult-box feed will be available for media. Cameras will be permitted inside the Cathedral.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: The Road Traveled, And The Road That Lies Ahead

September 6, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
THE ROAD TRAVELED, AND THE ROAD THAT LIES AHEAD


Two years ago this week (September 8), I began my service here in Philadelphia as archbishop. Two years from now, this same week, we'll be in the final stages of preparing for the eighth World Meeting of Families (September 22-27). It's a good moment to pause and reflect.

The future is always shaped in part by the past, because we become what we do. Our choices and decisions, our mistakes, virtues, sins and achievements - all these things become the record of "character encountering circumstance" that we call history. All of us are influenced by events in the past. None of us is determined by them. The future depends on our willingness to learn the right lessons from our history and apply them honestly to the new realities we face, here and now. So it is with individuals. And so it is with the Church.

Philadelphia Catholics have lived through a decade of tough news: the suffering of abuse victims and their families; two grand jury reports; priests removed from ministry; parish mergers; school closings; declining Mass attendance; well-intentioned but poor financial management; outright embezzlement - all of it compounded by complacency, inertia and too little transparency and accountability at almost every level of Church life.

I've said these things before, many times. They're painful to say and difficult to hear. But they're worth remembering this September because we're on a different course now, a better one; and we've come a long way in a short time. I get plenty of angry emails and letters every week - it goes with the job - but I've also been deeply moved by the number of people, both clergy and lay, from Pennsylvania and all over the country, who've offered extraordinary words of encouragement and support.

I think I know why. Philadelphia is not just another diocese. The Church here has roots that go to the heart of the American Catholic experience and to the core of our nation's best ideals. And if God can use poor instruments like you and me to rekindle the fire of the Gospel in the churches of Philadelphia, then he can work that miracle anywhere. I want my life as a Christian to be part of that story; and again and again over the past two years, I've met good people in parishes across the archdiocese who want exactly the same.

The history that shapes Philadelphia Catholics is more than just the wounds of the last 10 or 20 years, as serious as they are. It's a history built from 205 years of growing and extending the faith; two centuries of serving the sick and the poor, educating young people, welcoming the stranger, and humanizing the wider Pennsylvania community with a witness of Christian love and justice. We need to keep these truths about our Church vividly in our memory. They belong to us as our inheritance. Generations of Philadelphia Catholics proved their faith by their suffering, generosity and hard work. We need to recover that same kind of vigorous faith in our own lives - a zeal to renew the Church in the present, and to shape the future with the message of Jesus Christ.

A lot remains to be done. As our financial reports made clear earlier this summer, the material needs of the Church are real and severe. Ministry is the work of Gospel. That's always our priority. It always will remain so. Ministry, however, runs on resources. When the Church in Philadelphia pursues the sale of properties, or the leasing of our cemeteries, or the marketing of a vitally important ministry like our health care system, we do it reluctantly. We also remain keenly aware of the obligations we have to our employees, to the wider Catholic and non-Catholic community, and especially to the people we serve.

But we can't renew the life of our local Church with good intentions and plans ungrounded in fact. We need prudence and clear thinking. The future depends on what we do right now, and right now we need to be willing to continue the hard work of personal conversion and institutional reform that we've already begun. There's no other path to a vigorous and fruitful Catholic presence in Philadelphia in the decades ahead.

The past two years have seen difficult times. More challenges will surely come. But the people of this extraordinary Church - priests, deacons, religious and lay persons across the Archdiocese of Philadelphia - have been, and are, and will always be, the greatest gift from God in my life as a pastor. Please pray for me, as I pray every day for you.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Philadelphia Eagles, Chef Jose Garces Help Open New Food Pantry With Catholic Social Services At Casa Del Carmen

September 6, 2013

PHILADELPHIA EAGLES, CHEF JOSE GARCES
HELP OPEN NEW FOOD PANTRY WITH
CATHOLIC SOCIAL SERVICES AT CASA DEL CARMEN


The Green Light Pantry at Casa del Carmen, a ministry of Catholic Social Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, is now one of two food pantries in the city solely providing nutritious foods to clients, as well as free nutrition workshops, health screenings and other services.

Christina Weiss Lurie, President of the Philadelphia Eagles Youth Partnership, and Jose Garces, award-winning Iron Chef and co-founder of the Garces Foundation, will take part in the grand opening event of the new food pantry.

Tuesday, September 10, 2013
3:00 p.m.
Casa del Carmen
4400 North Reese Street
Philadelphia, PA 19140


The Green Light Pantry, developed by the Greater Philadelphia Coalition Against Hunger, is focused on promoting healthy eating while helping low-income families put food on the table. It will provide families with foods categorized as "green light foods" under a system developed by the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank, which ranks foods based on their nutritional value and USDA dietary guidelines.

Chef Garces will perform a cooking demonstration for Casa del Carmen families using foods available from The Green Light Pantry.

# # #


Editor's Note: Casa del Carmen has served the Latino community of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia since 1954, providing counseling, family support services, daycare and afterschool programs for children. For more information on Casa del Carmen please visit http://www.catholicsocialservicesphilly.org/family_service_centers_casadelcarmen.php.


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia To Host September Installments Of The Year Of Faith Lecture Series

September 10, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA TO HOST SEPTEMBER INSTALLMENTS OF
THE YEAR OF FAITH LECTURE SERIES


Prominent Catholic speaker and writer, Brad S. Gregory, Professor and Director of the Institute for Advanced Study at the University of Notre Dame, will be the presenter at the 3rd installment of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia's Year of Faith Lecture Series. Science vs. Religion: The Compatibility of Catholicism and the Natural Sciences is the title of Professor Gregory's presentation.

Professor Brad Gregory
Thursday, September 12, 2013
7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary (Vianney Hall Auditorium)
100 East Wynnewood Road
Wynnewood, PA 19096 (Montgomery County)


Ross Douthat, author and New York Times columnist, will be the presenter at the 4th installment of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia's Year of Faith Lecture Series. His presentation is titled Bad Religion: How We Become a Nation of Heretics.

Ross Douthat
Thursday, September 19, 2013
7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary (Vianney Hall Auditorium)
100 East Wynnewood Road
Wynnewood, PA 19096 (Montgomery County)


The Year of Faith is currently being celebrated throughout the Archdiocese of Philadelphia as the Universal Church commemorates the 50th anniversary of the opening of the Second Vatican Council.
The Year of Faith Lecture Series is sponsored by the Office for the New Evangelization of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. All are welcome to attend.

# # #


Editor's Note: For more information on this lecture series please contact Meghan Cokeley,
Director, Office for the New Evangelization at 215-587-5630 or visit http://www.phillyevang.org/.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Immaculate Mary Home Honors Five Women At Centenarian Luncheon

September 12, 2013

IMMACULATE MARY HOME HONORS
FIVE WOMEN AT CENTENARIAN LUNCHEON


Immaculate Mary Home, a Catholic Health Care Services skilled nursing and rehabilitation center of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, will be hosting a Centenarian Luncheon for five of their residents.

Thursday, September 12, 2013
12 p.m.
Immaculate Mary Home
2990 Holme Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19136


Guests of honor include:
Irma Macho, 107 (second oldest woman in the city of Philadelphia)
Mary Oliver, 103
Margaret Palermo, 102
Zelma Finnegan, 101
Marie Villella, 101

Family members and staff members are also invited to attend this special event in the First Floor Meeting Room.

# # #


Editor's Note: Immaculate Mary Home is a Catholic, non-profit, 296-bed Skilled Nursing Facility located in Northeast Philadelphia. For more information please visit http://www.immaculatemaryhome.org/.


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Announces Continuation Of Parish Area Pastoral Planning Initiative 46 Parishes In Philadelphia, Bucks, Delaware And Montgomery Counties Will Begin Parish Area Pastoral Planning Initiative

September 16, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA ANNOUNCES
CONTINUATION OF PARISH AREA
PASTORAL PLANNING INITIATIVE

46 parishes in Philadelphia, Bucks, Delaware and Montgomery counties
Will begin Parish Area Pastoral Planning Initiative


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced today the continuation of the Parish Area Pastoral Planning Initiative among 46 parishes in Philadelphia, Bucks, Delaware and Montgomery Counties. This process is designed to allow groups of parishes known as Pastoral Planning Areas (PPAs) within the same geographic area to undertake a program of self-study. It is led by the pastors in conjunction with parish leadership, parishioners, and the Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee.

The need for this process was outlined in a pastoral letter from the Fall of 2010 which called on all parishes in the Archdiocese to determine if they possess the resources necessary to accomplish their roles in the mission of Christ while remaining sustainable and vibrant faith communities. It is hoped that the end result will be the strongest possible parishes that are poised for stability, growth, and service to God's people now and far into the future throughout the Archdiocese.

The work of Parish Area Pastoral Planning is conducted in multiple stages. It involves a review of information related to demographic, financial and spiritual activity followed by consultation with parish leadership, parishioners and the Archdiocese. Finally, recommendations are made for the future. There are three possible outcomes from the work: parish mergers, no change in structure with a plan for future sustainability, or a recommendation for future study.

Every outcome is based on a combination of factors, including, but not limited to, demographic shifts in Catholic populations, concentrated density of parishes in a limited geographic area, history of declining Mass attendance and sacramental activity, increasing economic challenges that threaten sustainability, a decrease in the availability of clergy to staff parishes and a review of facilities.

The Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee, made up of lay persons, priests and Archdiocesan personnel, is examining all parishes within the Archdiocese to gauge their viability and assess whether they possess the resources to accomplish their role in the mission of the Church while remaining sustainable and vibrant faith communities.

Parish Area Pastoral Planning is designed to be as collaborative and consultative as possible. Its goal is to provide pastors, after consulting their parish leadership, with the opportunity to dialogue with members of the Strategic Planning Committee in providing joint recommendations to the Archbishop for growth and sustainability within their respective geographic areas. Additionally, in the majority of cases, the regional bishop and the dean meet with the pastors as well as their pastoral and finance councils to hear their concerns and receive their recommendations.

The Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee shares all final proposals with the Council of Priests and the College of Consultors for their review before final approval by the Archbishop.

Parishes Undergoing Study

Delaware County


PPA310

Holy Spirit, Sharon Hill
Sacred Heart, Clifton Heights
Saint Eugene, Primos
Saint Joseph, Collingdale

PPA300
Our Lady of Fatima, Secane
Our Lady of Peace, Milmont Park
Our Lady of Perpetual Help, Morton
Saint Gabriel, Norwood
Saint George, Glenolden
Saint Madeline, Ridley Park
Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque, Tinicum
Saint Rose of Lima, Eddystone
Notre Dame de Lourdes, Swarthmore

Montgomery County


PPA 460

Mother of Divine Providence, King of Prussia
Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Bridgeport
Sacred Heart, Swedesburg
Saints Cosmas and Damian, Conshohocken
Saint Augustine, Bridgeport
Saint Gertrude, West Conshohocken
Saint Mary, Conshohocken
Saint Matthew, Conshohocken

PPA 480
Queen of Peace, Ardsley
Saint David, Willow Grove
Saint John of the Cross, Roslyn
Saint Luke the Evangelist, Glenside

Philadelphia


PPA 630
Holy Spirit, South Philadelphia
Saint Charles Borromeo, South Philadelphia
Saint Edmond, South Philadelphia
Saint Gabriel, South Philadelphia
Saint Monica, South Philadelphia
Saint Richard, South Philadelphia
Saint Rita of Cascia, South Philadelphia
Saint Thomas Aquinas, South Philadelphia

Lower Bucks County


PPA 100

Our Lady of Fatima, Bensalem
Saint Ann, Bristol
Saint Charles Borromeo, Bensalem
Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton, Bensalem
Saint Ephrem, Bensalem
Saint Mark, Bristol
Saint Thomas Aquinas, Croydon

PPA 110
Immaculate Conception BVM, Levittown
Our Lady of Grace, Penndel
Queen of the Universe, Levittown
Saint Frances Cabrini, Fairless Hills
Saint Joseph the Worker, Fallsington
Saint Michael the Archangel, Levittown

# # #


Editor's Note: There are currently 235 parishes in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. When the Pastoral Planning Initiative began there were 266 parishes.


Contact
Kenneth Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Annual Blessing Of The School Bag Liturgy At Saint Helena School

September 16, 2013

Annual Blessing of the School Bag Liturgy at Saint Helena School


Saint Helena School will host their annual Blessing of the School Bag Liturgy for students in kindergarten through eighth grade.

Tuesday, September 24, 2013
9:00 a.m. (Liturgy)
Saint Helena School
1499 DeKalb Pike
Blue Bell, PA 19422


The Liturgy is held on the feast day of Our Lady of Mercy, the patron saint of the Sisters of Mercy. Saint Helena is a Mercy School.

Family and friends of the students are welcome to attend.

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Editor's Note: For more information about Saint Helena School visit http://www.sainthelenaschool.org/.


Contact
Annie Korp
Communications Assistant
215-587-3747

Catholicphilly.com Wins Web Marketing Association's Award For Outstanding Achievement In Web Development Catholic Philly Is The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia's Official Online News Agency

September 19, 2013

CATHOLICPHILLY.COM WINS WEB MARKETING ASSOCIATION'S AWARD FOR OUTSTANDING ACHIEVEMENT
IN WEB DEVELOPMENT

Catholic Philly is the Archdiocese of Philadelphia's official online news agency


CatholicPhilly.com was awarded the Faith-Based Standard of Excellence Award on September 12, 2013 by the Web Marketing Association. Websites considered for this award were judged based on seven criteria: design, user friendliness, copywriting, interactivity, use of technology, innovation and content.

The official digital news outlet of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia was the only Catholic organization to win an award in the national contest this year.

CatholicPhilly.com scored higher-than-average marks in the areas of design, content and writing. The website continues the mission of the former Catholic Standard and Times newspaper: to present Catholic news and catechesis to Catholics in the Philadelphia region that informs, inspires and forms them in the faith.

The WebAward Competition is the premier event for Web developers and marketers worldwide.

# # #



Editor's Note: For more information on the Web Marketing Association's 2013 WebAward visit
http://www.webaward.org/winner.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Saint Katherine Of Siena School Awarded $20,000 Grant Recognized By The Healey Education Foundation For Advancement Successes

September 20, 2013

SAINT KATHERINE OF SIENA SCHOOL
AWARDED $20,000 GRANT

Recognized by the Healey Education Foundation for Advancement Successes


Saint Katherine of Siena School in Philadelphia was awarded a $20,000 grant by the Healy Education Foundation at the Celebration of Achievement event earlier this month.

The foundation's School Advancement Grants for Excellence (SAGE) recognize outstanding work in implementing the foundation's Catholic School Development Program (CSDP) Methodology to achieve sustainable growth. Saint Katherine of Siena was selected from among 17 schools that submitted proposals on how the award would be used to significantly strengthen advancement efforts.

"Its proposal was not only visionary and detailed just as any grant proposal should be, but it demonstrated a real understanding of the CSDP Methodology," said Christine Healey, president of HEF.

The Methodology establishes best practices in five key areas: governance, enrollment management, development, communications, and operations. Saint Katherine's winning proposal highlighted its early achievements: enrollment growth of 11% in just one year, the successful opening of two Pre-K classes in 2012-13, formation of a 21-member board of limited jurisdiction, contact initiated with more than 5,000 alumni, and introduction of an annual fund. It then provided an action plan and budget for upgrading marketing materials, implementing data management systems, and creating an advancement team to achieve its broader public relations goals and represent the mission of the school.

"We are most grateful to the Healey Educational Foundation for recognizing the wonderful work of Saint Katherine of Siena School who has shown boldness and innovation with their CSDP initiative," said Christopher Mominey, Secretary for Catholic Education. "This stands as another example of the excellent Catholic education that we are building upon here in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia."

Saint Katherine of Siena School is one of six elementary schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia participating in the pilot project PACE (Partners Advancing Catholic Education), made possible through the HEF partnership with the Connelly Foundation.

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Editor's Notes: For more information about Saint Katherine of Siena School please visit http://www.sksgradeschool.org/.


Contact
Annie Korp
Communications Assistant
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Colum: Lessons We Need To Learn

September 20, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUM:
LESSONS WE NEED TO LEARN



Most Americans have immigrant roots. I'm no exception. While my mother's family was Native American (Prairie Band Potowatomi), my father's heritage was French Canadian. Growing up in the 1950s, I was very aware that French-speaking Canada - Quebec - was among the most deeply Catholic regions in the world. For more than 200 years, the Church in Quebec not only preached the Gospel, educated the young and ministered to the poor and infirm, but also sustained French language and culture in the face of Canada's English-speaking Protestant majority.

Quebec's "Quiet Revolution" destroyed all that in just a few decades. Starting in the mid-20th century and speeding up quickly after Vatican II, Quebeckers left the Church in droves. Today barely 5 percent of Quebeckers attend Mass regularly. The Church is often seen as an object of scorn. How did it happen? There's no single reason. Church leaders brought some of the trouble on themselves through overconfidence, inertia and an inability to see the changing terrain of their people. Consumerism colonized the lay faithful. And the culture became dominated by new and highly secularized leaders in politics, education and mass media.

Quebec's ruling party - the Parti Quebecois (PQ) - is now pressing for a "Charter of Quebec Values." The charter seeks to solidify Quebec as a secularist state and, among other things, ban government employees from wearing religious dress and symbols in the name of social unity. Quebec's bishops have voiced concern about the charter's impact on religious freedom - not just for minorities like Muslims and Sikhs, but for Catholics as well. More broadly, critics have attacked the PQ for using liberal democracy and religious neutrality as alibis for hostility to any vigorous religious role in the public square. In the words of one Canadian political observer, "Quebec, for the purposes of its own ruling elites, has renounced its past."

Of course, America has a very different history from Canada and especially from Quebec. Even in Quebec, support for the proposed charter has declined in recent weeks as criticism has grown. Religious freedom is embedded deeply in the U.S. Constitution. So why should any of this matter to American Catholics?

It matters because the impulse to muzzle religious faith as a public force, to confine religious witness to churches and private homes, to bully faith-related ministries into shedding their religious principles in order to do their public work, is now just as real in the United States as it is in Europe and Quebec. It merely takes different forms.

The lessons we can learn from events like those in Quebec are two.

Here's the first lesson: Our faith needs to be more than a nostalgic habit; more than a sentimental exercise in good will; and the Church needs to be more than a religious institution. Christianity, as C.S. Lewis once famously wrote, is a "fighting religion" - not in the sense of belligerence or ill will, but as a struggle against our own sins and complacency; a struggle to give ourselves wholly to Jesus Christ, and then bring Jesus Christ to the world.

As individuals and as a Church, if we don't have a restlessness for God, a passion for Jesus Christ and the poor and needy he loves, then we should stop telling ourselves that we're Christians. A religion of words and habit, a religion without daily inner repentance and commitment, hollows out from the inside. And it can evaporate overnight.

Here's the second lesson. If we don't live our Catholic faith and defend our religious liberty vigorously, then sooner or later we'll lose both. For more than a year, America's bishops have repeatedly stressed the coercive - even vindictive - nature of the current administration's HHS contraceptive mandate. No one "needs" this mandate as a matter of health. It's purely an imposition of ideology on the freedom of religious communities and individuals to live their convictions in their public work. If Catholics fail to resist this coercion, then more coercion will follow. It's that simple.

No one grasps the nature of this issue better than New York's Cardinal Timothy Dolan, and we should consider his words in closing this week's column:

"The Catholic Church in America has long been a leader in providing affordable health care, and in advocating for policies that advance that goal. The bishops on a national level have been at it for almost one hundred years, and our heroic women and men religious have done so even longer. Yet, instead of spending our time, energy, and treasure on increasing access to health care, as we have done for many decades, we're now forced to spend those resources on determining how to respond to recently enacted government regulations that restrict and burden our religious freedom. Catholics - our parents and grandparents, religious sisters, brothers and priests - were among the first at the table to advance and provide health care, and now we are being burdened because of the same Catholic values that compel us into these ministries! All this in a country that puts religious liberty first on the list of its most cherished freedoms. As I've said before, this is a fight that we didn't ask for, and would rather not be in, but it's certainly one that we won't run from."

Amen.

Readers are encouraged to voice their support for religious liberty at the website of the Pennsylvania Catholic Conference, https://www.votervoice.net/PACC/Campaigns/30694/Respond.



Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Carmelite Monastery Of Philadelphia Holds Annual Triduum Honoring Saint Therese

September 24, 2013

CARMELITE MONASTERY OF PHILADELPHIA HOLDS ANNUAL TRIDUUM HONORING SAINT THÉRÈSE


The annual Triduum in honor of Saint Thérèse will again be held at the Carmelite Monastery of Philadelphia.

Sunday - Tuesday, September 29 - October 1, 2013
6:45 p.m. (Rosary and Litany each evening)
7:30 p.m. (Mass each evening)
Carmelite Monastery
1400 66th Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19126


The Triduum is especially noteworthy this year as the relics of Saint Thérèse and her parents will be brought to Philadelphia for Magnificat Day on November 9, 2013. The relics will be kept at the Carmelite Monastery for veneration after Magnificat Day.

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Editor's Note: A Discalced Carmelite nun, Saint Thérèse of the Child Jesus and the Holy Face is also known as the Little Flower of Jesus. She was canonized May 17, 1923 by Pope Pius XI. Her feast day is October 1st.


Contact
Annie Korp
Communications Assistant
215-587-3747

Two Archdiocesan Elementary Schools Named National Blue Ribbon Schools

September 25, 2013

TWO ARCHDIOCESAN ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS NAMED
NATIONAL BLUE RIBBON SCHOOLS


Saint Andrew (Bucks County) and Saint Patrick (Chester County) Parish Elementary Schools selected as 2013
National Blue Ribbon Schools


Saint Andrew (Bucks County) and Saint Patrick (Chester County) Parish Elementary Schools were selected as part of the 2013 cohort of National Blue Ribbon Schools during an announcement made by United States Secretary of Education, Arne Duncan, live on Tuesday, September 24, 2013 via the United States Department of Education's (USDOE) USTREAM channel. Saint Andrew and Saint Patrick were two of only 286 schools nationally, 15 schools statewide and the only Catholic schools in Pennsylvania selected this year.

Saint Andrew and Saint Patrick schools will be honored by the USDOE at a recognition ceremony for Blue Ribbon Schools on November 18-19 in Washington, D.C.

In reaction to the announcement Ms. Jacqueline Coccia, Superintendent for Elementary Schools said, "We are extremely proud of Saint Andrew and Saint Patrick Schools for achieving the prestigious distinction of Blue Ribbon Schools. The teachers, administrators and school families at these institutions are a testament to the quality of Catholic education throughout the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. We couldn't be happier to see their hard work and dedication recognized on a national level."

Founded in 1982, the National Blue Ribbon Schools Program recognizes public and private elementary, middle, and high schools where students perform at very high levels or where significant improvements are being made in students' academic achievement. Since the program's founding, the U.S. Department of Education has bestowed this coveted award on more than 7,500 of America's schools.


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Editor's Note: For information about schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia please visit www.catholicschools-phl.org. For a complete list of 2013 National Blue Ribbon Schools visit http://www2.ed.gov/programs/nclbbrs/index.html.


Contact
Bonnie Olinger
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Pope Francis And 'the Interview'

September 25, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
POPE FRANCIS AND 'THE INTERVIEW'


I had the gift of two unusual blessings last week. The first was a moment to greet Pope Francis in Rome after his Wednesday, September 18, general audience. We had met and served as delegates to the 1997 Special Assembly for America. Sixteen years have passed, but this Pope has a remarkable memory to match his generous spirit. He recalled a friendly conversation we'd had in great detail, and the events of those days that helped shape both of us as young bishops.

The second blessing was being away from the United States on September 19 when Jesuit magazines around the world released the Pope's remarks to Father Antonio Spadaro, S.J. Thanks to my schedule, I couldn't read the full interview until I was on the plane home, four days after it appeared. But the emails I received about it - some of them happy; some of them angry; some of them gloating; some of them from Catholics feeling confused or even betrayed - were instructive.

Some people grasped at the interview like a lifeline - or a vindication. One person praised the Holy Father for stressing that the "Church must focus on compassion and mercy, not on enforcing small-minded rules." She added that "we're at last free from the chains of hatred that have ruled the Catholic Church for so many years and led to my unease in bringing my own children into that Church."

More common though were emails from catechists, parents and everyday Catholics who felt confused by media headlines suggesting that the Church had somehow changed her teaching on a variety of moral issues.

I heard from a mother of four children - one adopted, another disabled from birth -- who'd spent years counseling pregnant girls and opening prolife clinics. She wanted to know why the Pope seemed to dismiss her sacrifices. A priest said the Pope "has implicitly accused brother priests who are serious about moral issues of being small minded," and that "[if you're a priest,] being morally serious is now likely to get you publicly cast as a problem." Another priest wrote that "the problem is that [the Holy Father] makes all of the wrong people happy, people who will never believe in the Gospel and who will continue to persecute the Church."

We can draw some useful lessons from these reactions. First, we need to be very careful in taking mass media coverage of the Catholic Church at face value. Second, we need to actually read the Holy Father's interview for ourselves, and pray over it, and then read it again, especially in light of the Year of Faith. A priest here in Philadelphia asked for a show of hands at a Mass last Sunday, and nearly everyone in the church, which was full, had heard about the Pope's interview. But only five persons had actually read it. Third and finally, we need to open our hearts -- all of us -- and let God lead us where he needs us to go through the words of the Holy Father.

Pope Francis does not at all turn away from Catholic teaching on matters such as sexuality and the sanctity of human life. How could he? We should remember that Mother Teresa and Dorothy Day - two women with an intimate, passionate devotion to the poor - also saw abortion as a brutal crime against the poorest and most defenseless of the poor: the unborn child.

Among the many vital things the Pope reminds us of in his interview is the new and drastically different condition of the modern world that God seeks to save. It's one thing to argue about abortion and sexuality when both disputants in the debate share the same basic moral framework and language; the same meaning to words like "justice;" the same set of beliefs about the nature of the human person. But it's quite another thing when we no longer have that common vocabulary. The modern world is mission territory. It's morally fractured. Our politics, as Alasdair MacIntyre once famously wrote, is civil war pursued by other means. The modern heart can only be won back by a radical witness of Christian discipleship - a renewed kind of shared community life obedient to God's Commandments, but also on fire with the Beatitudes lived more personally and joyfully by all of us.

There's a passage from the Pope's interview we need to remember in a special way in the weeks and years ahead:

"Proclamation of [Jesus Christ] in a missionary style focuses on the essentials, on the necessary things: This is also what fascinates and attracts more, what makes the heart burn as it did for the disciples at Emmaus. We have to find a new balance; otherwise even the moral edifice of the Church is likely to fall like a house of cards, losing the freshness and fragrance of the Gospel . . . The proclamation of the saving love of God comes before moral and religious imperatives."

The Holy Father asks none of us to abandon the task of bringing the world to Jesus Christ. Our witness matters. Every unborn child saved, every marriage strengthened, every immigrant helped, every poor person served, matters. God calls on us to help him sanctify every aspect of our shared lives - at home, at work and in the public square.

But if, as the Pope describes her, the Church is a "field hospital" for the wounded in a cruel world, then the goal of our witness is to create a space of beauty and mercy; to accompany those who suffer; to understand the nature of their lives; to care for and heal even those who reject us. We need to speak the truth, and work for the truth, with love. And we need to realize that nothing we do - either as individuals or parish communities -- will bear fruit unless we give ourselves to the whole Gospel with our whole heart.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Statement Regarding The Arrest Of Reverend Robert L. Brennan

September 26, 2013

STATEMENT REGARDING THE ARREST OF
REVEREND ROBERT L. BRENNAN


Father Robert L. Brennan was removed from active ministry in September 2005 following the Grand Jury report issued by the Philadelphia District Attorney. He has not been permitted to function as a priest anywhere since that time. A canonical process aimed at his laicization is in progress with the Holy See.

His current arrest stems from an allegation of sexual abuse involving a minor reported to the Archdiocese in January 2013. The alleged wrongful conduct occurred between 12 and 15 years ago prior to his removal from ministry. The Archdiocese immediately reported the information to the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office, and cooperated fully with the subsequent investigation. Since arriving in Philadelphia, Archbishop Chaput has reinforced the Archdiocese's strong commitment to work with law enforcement in ensuring justice for victims of sexual assault. The Archdiocese reports all allegations of sexual abuse of minors to public authorities.

Father Brennan is 75 years old. He was ordained in 1964. He has served at the following parishes in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia: Saint Pius X, Broomall (1964-1970); Our Lady of Calvary, Philadelphia (1970-1974); Stella Maris, Philadelphia (1974-1981); Saint George, Glenolden (1981-1986); Chaplain, Archbishop Prendergast High School, Drexel Hill (1986); Saint Helena, Philadelphia (1986-1988); Saint Ignatius of Antioch, Yardley (1988-1989); Saint Eleanor, Collegeville (1989); Saint Mary Schwenksville (1989-1992); Leave of Absence (1992-1993); Resurrection of Our Lord (1993-2004); Chaplain, Camilla Hall (2004-2005); Ministry Restricted and faculties removed (2005).

To Make a Report

If you have information to report to the District Attorney regarding Father Brennan, please call his office at 215-686-8000.

If you would like to report an allegation of sexual abuse, contact your local law enforcement agency and/or the Archdiocesan Office of Investigations at 1-888-930-9010.

If you would like to report a violation of The Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries, please contact the Office of Investigations.

We recognize that this public notice may be painful to victims of sexual violence. If you need support or assistance, victim services are available to you through the Victim Assistance Office of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia at 1-888-800-8780.

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Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Announces Outsourced Management Agreement And Long-term Lease With Stonemor L.p. Regarding Catholic Cemeteries Stonemor To Manage 13 Catholic Cemeteries This Announcement Details The Latest In A Series Of Actions Taken By The Archdiocese To Rebuild A Firm Fiscal Foundation; Archdiocese To Retain Ownership Of Cemeteries, Which Will Continue Their Mission With No Perceptible Change.

September 26, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA ANNOUNCES OUTSOURCED MANAGEMENT
AGREEMENT AND LONG-TERM LEASE WITH STONEMOR L.P.
REGARDING CATHOLIC CEMETERIES
STONEMOR TO MANAGE 13 CATHOLIC CEMETERIES

This announcement details the latest in a series of actions taken by the Archdiocese to rebuild a firm fiscal foundation; Archdiocese to retain ownership of cemeteries, which will continue their mission with no perceptible change.


Contextual Background

This July, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia published audited financial statements for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012. The financial statements disclosed a $39.2 million operating deficit for that period as well as several very significant and ongoing balance sheet liabilities that measure in the hundreds of millions of dollars.

Since his arrival in Philadelphia nearly two years ago, Archbishop Chaput has repeatedly expressed his commitment to financial transparency and prudent stewardship of the resources of the Archdiocese. Beginning last summer, a series of steps were taken to begin to remedy Archdiocesan fiscal challenges. The Archbishop's residence along with a property in Ventnor, New Jersey, were both sold to provide necessary immediate cash flow. Many other actions followed including a reduction of 25% of the workforce at the Archdiocesan Pastoral Center in order to stem the operating deficit. Additionally, an evaluation of various Archdiocesan real estate assets and operating entities was undertaken. This evaluation focused on assets that could potentially be used to remedy the unfunded balance sheet obligations. None of those measures were taken lightly, but all were essential to maintaining the presence of the Catholic Church in the Philadelphia region and the good works accomplished through its various ministries.

Background Regarding Today's Announcement

Among the operating entities evaluated was the Office of Catholic Cemeteries, which has been well managed for many years. Archbishop Chaput decided to pursue an outsourced management and leasing arrangement for the 13 Archdiocesan cemeteries located throughout the five-county Philadelphia region.

Today, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced that it has elected to enter into such an arrangement with StoneMor Partners L.P. via a 60-year term. StoneMor, headquartered in Levittown (Bucks County) is the second largest owner and operator of cemeteries in the nation. StoneMor currently owns and operates 277 cemeteries and 92 funeral homes in 27 states and Puerto Rico.

Financial and Other Important Details of the Transaction

Upon closing, subject to satisfaction of certain conditions precedent, StoneMor will provide an initial lease payment of $53 million to the Archdiocese. Since the cemeteries were pledged as collateral for the promissory note previously established for the Trust and Loan Fund, it is expected that $30 million from the initial payment will be used to lessen the previously disclosed $82 million unfunded liability in that fund. The balance will be used for previously disclosed unfunded liabilities for risk insurance and the priests' pension. The arrangement also calls for annual lease payments as follows:

Other key points included in the arrangement are as follows: This strategic, landmark arrangement is the latest in a series of actions taken by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia to help restore a solid financial foundation. It is part of the ongoing Archdiocesan effort to build the strongest possible Catholic Church in Philadelphia-one that will be sustainable now and far into the future.

"This arrangement serves the people of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia well by maintaining our cemeteries as sacred, dignified places of burial while offering employment and important protections for our dedicated staff," said Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. "This is not a decision I came to lightly. It is being entered into only after significant discussion, consideration, prayer and approval by the Holy See. It allows us to retain ownership of the Catholic Cemeteries while creating immediate and long-term benefits to help us rebuild a strong financial footing. StoneMor is a local company with a deep experience in the management of cemeteries. This factor, combined with their willingness to maintain the Catholic identity of our cemeteries, made them the logical choice.

As I've said many times before, I'm committed to continuing an open and honest dialogue regarding our financial condition and the steps we take to fix it. With a stronger, more stable financial position, we will be able to best fulfill the Church's mission of evangelization and service to all those in need."

StoneMor Brings Local Roots, National Expertise to Cemeteries; Maintains Catholic Values & Sacred Duty of Providing Dignified Burials for the Faithful Departed

Larry Miller, President and Chief Executive Officer of StoneMor Partners commented, "We are delighted with this transaction. The 13 cemeteries we will be managing have performed a combined average of about 7,000 burials per year. In terms of providing services to so many families per year, this transaction marks the second largest enterprise we have taken on since becoming public in 2004. As with previous transactions, we will be bringing to each property our unique expertise in offering and managing pre-need planning for families. StoneMor has been successful to date effectively transitioning management and operations of properties that are new to our portfolio, and we anticipate a continuation of that trend here."

"Although there will be a change in management," continued Miller, "all 13 Catholic cemeteries will continue to be owned by the Archdiocese throughout the term of the arrangement. Operations will be conducted in a manner consistent with Catholic values and the core mission of the cemeteries. The cemeteries will continue to carry out the sacred duty of providing dignified Catholic burials for the faithful departed according to all current practices and policies. There will be no perceptible change for visitors to the cemeteries or individuals seeking to provide burial space for themselves or their loved ones. We will also provide a level of care for the properties consistent with historical practices. It should be noted that parish cemeteries will not be affected as they are operated at the local level and are not part of this arrangement."

Cemeteries Included in the Arrangement

The following is a list of cemeteries that are included in the outsourced management and lease arrangement with StoneMor: All Souls Cemetery, Coatesville (Chester County); Calvary Cemetery, West Conshohocken (Montgomery County); Cathedral Cemetery, Philadelphia; New Cathedral Cemetery, Philadelphia; Holy Cross Cemetery, Yeadon (Delaware County); Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, Cheltenham (Montgomery County); Immaculate Heart of Mary Cemetery, Linwood (Delaware County); Resurrection Cemetery, Bensalem (Bucks County); Saint John Neumann Cemetery, Chalfont (Bucks County); Saint Michael Cemetery, Chester (Delaware County); Saints Peter and Paul Cemetery, Springfield (Delaware County); All Saints Cemetery, Newtown (Bucks County); and Holy Savior Cemetery, Penn Township (Chester County).

Impact on Current Employees and Stakeholders of Catholic Cemeteries

All current full-time, year-round Catholic Cemeteries staff members will be offered employment with StoneMor and become employees of StoneMor effective with the closing date. As part of the arrangement, those employees have meaningful protections for a period of two years at their current base pay. They will also receive health benefits under StoneMor's healthcare plans. Additionally, years of service will be taken into account when determining the accrual of vacation time. "Our intent is to keep these employees whole, and we have a very strong track record of doing so in integrations like this," said Miller.

The Archdiocese is committed to working closely with StoneMor to ensure that all who are connected with Catholic Cemeteries experience a smooth transition. All priests of the Archdiocese as well as funeral directors and monument dealers with whom the Catholic cemeteries work are also being informed. "We look forward to working collaboratively with all who have served the families of the Archdiocese," Miller added.


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Editor's Note:

About Catholic Cemeteries in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia
Founded in 1849, the Catholic Cemeteries Office of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia operates 13 cemeteries located in Chester, Delaware, Bucks, Montgomery and Philadelphia counties. Last year it conducted nearly 7,000 burials. It is staffed by approximately 160 full-time, year-round and approximately 30 seasonal employees in its central office at the Archdiocesan Pastoral Center and at individual cemeteries.

For additional information about the Catholic Cemeteries of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, please visit http://www.archphila-cemeteries.org/


About StoneMor Partners L.P.
StoneMor Partners L.P., headquartered in Levittown (Bucks County), is an owner and operator of cemeteries and funeral homes in the United States, with 277 cemeteries and 92 funeral homes in 27 states and Puerto Rico. StoneMor is a publicly traded company. StoneMor's cemetery products and services, which are sold on both a pre-need (before death) and at-need (at death) basis, include: burial lots, lawn and mausoleum crypts, burial vaults, caskets, memorials, and all services that provide for the installation of this merchandise.

For additional information about StoneMor Partners L.P., please visit StoneMor's website, and the Investor Relations section, at www.stonemor.com.

Forward-Looking Statements

Certain statements contained in this press release, including, but not limited to, information regarding the status and progress of StoneMor's operating activities, the plans and objectives of its management, assumptions regarding its future performance and plans, and any financial guidance provided, as well as certain information in other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission and elsewhere, are forward-looking statements. The words "believe," "may," "will," "estimate," "continue," "anticipate," "intend," "project," "expect," "predict," and similar expressions identify these forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are made subject to certain risks and uncertainties that could cause StoneMor's actual results of operations to differ materially from those expressed or implied by forward-looking statements, including, but not limited to, the following: uncertainties associated with future revenue and revenue growth; the effect of the current economic downturn; the impact of StoneMor's significant leverage on its operating plans; StoneMor's ability to service its debt and pay distributions; the decline in the fair value of certain equity and debt securities held in its trusts; StoneMor's ability to attract, train and retain an adequate number of sales people; uncertainties associated with the volume and timing of pre-need sales of cemetery services and products; increased use of cremation; changes in the death rate; changes in the political or regulatory environments, including potential changes in tax accounting and trusting policies; StoneMor's ability to successfully implement a strategic plan relating to achieving operating improvement, strong cash flows and further deleveraging; StoneMor's ability to successfully compete in the cemetery and funeral home industry; uncertainties associated with the integration or the anticipated benefits of StoneMor's recent acquisitions and any future acquisitions; StoneMor's ability to complete and fund this transaction or future acquisitions; litigation or legal proceedings that could expose StoneMor to significant liabilities and damage its reputation; StoneMor's ability to maintain effective disclosure controls and procedures and internal control over financial reporting; the effects of cyber security attacks due to StoneMor's significant reliance on information technology; uncertainties relating to the financial condition of third-party insurance companies that fund StoneMor's pre-need funeral contracts; and various other uncertainties associated with the death care industry and StoneMor's operations in particular.

When considering forward-looking statements, the reader should keep in mind the risk factors and other cautionary statements set forth in StoneMor's Annual Report on Form 10-K and Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Except as required under applicable law, StoneMor assumes no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements made herein or any other forward-looking statements made by StoneMor, whether as a result of new information, future events, or otherwise.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Charles J. Chaput O.f.m. Cap. Featured As Keynote Speaker In The Year Of Faith Lecture Series Finale At Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary

September 30, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHARLES J. CHAPUT O.F.M. CAP. FEATURED AS KEYNOTE SPEAKER IN THE YEAR OF FAITH LECTURE SERIES FINALE AT SAINT CHARLES BORROMEO SEMINARY


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M Cap. will host the final installment of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia's Year of Faith Lecture Series on Tuesday, October 1, 2013. His presentation is titled Fire Upon the Earth: A Call to Conversion and a New Evangelization.

Tuesday, October 1, 2013
7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary (Vianney Hall Auditorium)
100 East Wynnewood Road
Wynnewood, PA 19096 (Montgomery County)


Archbishop Chaput previously described the Year of Faith Lecture Series by saying, "Through these lectures, we hope to offer Philadelphia Catholics during the Year of Faith a deeper understanding of the true meaning of faith, its authentic content and its orientation towards the transformation of the world around us."

The Year of Faith is being celebrated throughout the Archdiocese of Philadelphia as the Universal Church commemorates the 50th anniversary of the opening of the Second Vatican Council. It concludes at the end of November.

The Year of Faith Lecture Series is sponsored by the Office for the New Evangelization of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. All are welcome to attend.

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Editor's Note: For more information on the lecture series please contact Meghan Cokeley,
Director, Office for the New Evangelization, at 215-587-5630 or visit http://www.phillyevang.org/.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocesan High School Students Honored As Inaugural Maguire Foundation Scholars

October 1, 2013

ARCHDIOCESAN HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS HONORED AS
INAUGURAL MAGUIRE FOUNDATION SCHOLARS


The Maguire Foundation has committed $5 million in scholarships to educating students
in high schools throughout the Archdiocese of Philadelphia


125 high school students in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will be honored as inaugural Maguire Scholars by The Maguire Foundation at a reception hosted by Mr. and Mrs. James J. Maguire, Co-Principals of the foundation.

The Maguire Foundation has committed $5 million dollars in scholarships over the next seven years to support students attending Archdiocesan high schools.


Monday, October 7, 2013
4:30 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Drexel University
Behrakis Grand Hall
Creese Student Union Complex
3210 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19104



Bishop Michael Fitzgerald, who oversees Catholic education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, said, "We thank Mr. and Mrs. James Maguire and The Maguire Foundation for once again showing their unwavering commitment to educating students attending our schools. These scholarships will directly benefit our school families and enable their children to achieve excellence while preparing for future success within the context of a Catholic education."

For the 2013-2014 school year, a total of 125 freshmen have been selected to receive $2,000 scholarships for each of the four years they attend an Archdiocesan high school. These students were selected in collaboration with the presidents and admission directors at each high school. There are at least six Maguire Scholars represented at each of the 17 Archdiocese of Philadelphia High Schools and Mercy Vocational High School. In order to qualify, students must demonstrate financial need, meet academic benchmarks, actively participate in school activities and illustrate involvement in their communities.

"There is no better American investment today than to educate our students and teach them to believe what they are and to help them become what they believe", stated James J. Maguire, Founder and President of The Maguire Foundation.

The Maguire Foundation's mission is grounded in the belief (as taught by St. Ignatius Loyola), that we are men and women for others. The foundation's focus is to assist children and young adults with an opportunity to benefit from a quality education. They believe this is best achieved by partnering with institutions and families of need by providing tuition, scholarship assistance and grants for education through grade school, high school and college.

The Faith in the Future Foundation is an independent foundation that provides strategic management of the 17 Catholic high schools and four schools of special education and oversees the Office of Catholic Education in the Archdiocese.


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Editor's Note: For information about the Faith in the Future Foundation visit http://www.faithinthefuture.com/. To learn more about The Maguire Foundation please visit maguirefoundation.org/index.php.


Contact
Bonnie Olinger
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Immaculee Ilibagiza To Speak At Saint Maximilian Kolbe In West Chester Ilibagiza Is A Rwandan Genocide Survivor.

October 2, 2013

IMMACULEE ILIBAGIZA TO SPEAK AT SAINT MAXIMILIAN KOLBE IN WEST CHESTER
Ilibagiza is a Rwandan Genocide Survivor.


Saint Maximilian Kolbe Parish in West Chester (Chester County), will host a retreat featuring Rwandan genocide survivor Immaculée Ilibagiza.

Friday - Saturday, October 11-12, 2013
Saint Maximilian Kolbe Parish
15 East Pleasant Grove Road
West Chester, PA 19382 (Chester County)


Ilibagiza is the author of Discovering God Amidst the Rwandan Holocaust. During the retreat she will be discussing the power of forgiveness, the miracles of the rosary and how she overcame her struggles during the Rwandan genocide in 1994.

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Editor's Note: To register for the event, please visit www.Immaculee.com. For more information regarding the event or the location please contact Saint Maximilian rectory at 610-399-6936.


Contact
Annie Korp
Communications Assistant
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Celebrate Respect Life Mass The Respect Life Mass Marks The Beginning Of Respect Life Month

October 4, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO CELEBRATE
RESPECT LIFE MASS

The Respect Life Mass marks the beginning of Respect Life Month


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will be the celebrant and homilist at the annual Respect Life Mass. This Mass marks the beginning of Respect Life Month during which all Catholics are encouraged to promote the culture of life. All are welcome to attend.

Sunday, October 6, 2013
5:30p.m. to 6:15 p.m. (Confessions)
6:30 p.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Organized by the Office for Life and Family of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, the Respect Life Mass is a celebration of the Church's pro-life teachings. The Office for Life and Family promotes life through education, advocacy and pastoral care programs.

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops prepares a Respect Life Program every year that is launched on Respect Life Sunday, the first Sunday of October. It is the cornerstone of the bishops' pro-life educational outreach. This year's theme is "Open your hearts to life".

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Editor's Note: For more information, please contact the Archdiocese Office for Life and Family at 215-587-5661 or visit phillycatholiclife.org/.

To view materials and publications from the United States Conference Catholic Bishops visit
usccb.org/about/pro-life-activities/respect-life-program/index.cfm.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Saint Francis Country House Celebrates Centennial

October 4, 2013

SAINT FRANCIS COUNTRY HOUSE CELEBRATES CENTENNIAL


Saint Francis Country House, a member facility of Catholic Health Care Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, is celebrating one hundred years of providing health care services for the community. To commemorate the occasion, Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will celebrate a Mass of Thanksgiving. A celebration dinner will follow.

Friday, October 4, 2013
2:00 p.m. (Mass)
Chapel of St. Francis Country House
1412 Lansdowne Avenue
Darby, PA 19023

5:00 p.m. (Dinner)
Springfield Country Club
400 West Sproul Road
Springfield, PA 19064


Founded by Monsignor Francis Xavier Wastl in 1913, Saint Francis Country House began as a 15 bed home in the countryside where patients could go to recuperate through rest, good food and fresh air. During World War I, a second property was added in response to the United States Navy's need to send wounded marines and sailors there to convalesce. One hundred years later, Saint Francis Country House continues to offer excellent nursing care and rehabilitation services in the present 273 bed structure, with the help of over 400 employees.

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Editor's Note: Saint Francis Country House is the leader in short term rehab in Southeastern Delaware County and in the surrounding area, offering physical, occupational, and speech therapy, post-acute care, and a host of other rehab services. To learn more about Saint Francis Country House please visit http://www.stfranciscountryhouse.org/.


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: New Forms Of Catholic Life, A New Seminary, And 'the Way'

October 4, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
NEW FORMS OF CATHOLIC LIFE, A NEW SEMINARY, AND 'THE WAY'


Over the centuries, the Church has needed new life many times. And God has always called up new men and women to do the work. From the early Benedictines in the sixth century; to the Dominicans and Franciscans in the Middle Ages; to the Jesuits at the time of Reformation, God has used new forms of zeal and community to advance Catholic life.

My own first religious family - the Capuchins - began as a reform movement within a reform movement. The Capuchins wanted to recover the early Franciscan spirit and live it even more radically. So they took a new path - faithful but different.

The 20th century saw an explosion of new Catholic forms of life, both before and after Vatican II: Opus Dei, Focolare, Communion and Liberation, the Christian Life Movement and many others. Each has a distinct identity. Each has a unique mission. But led faithfully, all serve the Church by re-energizing Catholics who've grown cold in a culture that feeds the senses and starves the spirit. In my 25 years as a bishop. I've been struck again and again by the joy these new forms of service and community bring to Catholic life. They're a treasure for the Church. We need to encourage them here in Philadelphia.

One of the most dynamic of the new forms of life and service is the Neo-Catechumenal Way - or simply "The Way" as members know it. The Way began in Spain in the years after Vatican II, focused on service to the poor. As time passed, The Way developed into a complete way of life; a profound and on-going formation in Christian living based on the catechumenate - the period of basic instruction in the Christian faith -- of the Early Church. The Way sees itself very specifically as a tool for bishops and parish pastors to advance the new evangelization. Today The Way has hundreds of communities across the globe, including scores of Redemptoris Mater ("Mother of the Redeemer") missionary seminaries. Families in The Way often go on mission themselves. They engage in extraordinary Christian generosity.

Bill Beckman, a friend and former staff member of mine from years past, has been active in The Way, along with his wife and children, for a long time. One of Bill's sons recently chose to pursue the priesthood at one of The Way's new missionary seminaries, and Bill offered his thoughts as a father in an email:

"A missionary seminary is built upon a missionary charism. It's a necessity. The seminarians, who have discerned a call from God, acknowledge that call by placing themselves at God's disposal with a willingness to go wherever they are sent. At the recent [gathering] of more than 350 aspiring seminarians in Porto San Giorgio, Italy, [young men of the Neo-Catechumenal Way were] sent to more than 90 seminaries scattered over six continents. Young men from the United States were sent to seminaries in Ukraine, India, America, South Africa and Guam. They let go of attachment to home and family relationships for the sake of doing the will of God in service to his Church. This may sound very unusual to some of us, but in Jewish and Christian history it's not.

"Abraham left his father's native place and started walking to an unknown place where God would fulfill his promises. God called Moses to lead the Israelites out of the bondage of Egypt. The prophets all received calls to speak the word of God under difficult circumstances in the places God willed. The Virgin Mary responded in faith to the message of the angel without knowing that it would lead to the foot of the Cross. Joseph obeyed the message of an angel he heard in a dream and took the Child and his mother into Egypt to escape Herod's murderous intention. Jesus, faithful to his mission, made the ascent to Jerusalem and trod the path to Calvary. The apostles and their companions carried the Gospel to the nations, and this same dynamic movement of the Spirit has driven our missionary Church throughout the centuries.

"American history is full of stories of missionary dynamism, and this time of great change for the Church is no different. Pope Francis constantly speaks of 'going out,' accompanying those who are far away, on the periphery, or who are little regarded. The Church needs a new evangelization, one not rooted in comfortable and familiar ways, but in the renunciation of self, wealth, place and relationships. The service of The Way and the initiatives of other new movements and charisms are wonderful examples of the 'freshness and fragrance of the Gospel' in the words of Pope Francis. We are the recipients of this outpouring of blessings from God who is never outdone in generosity. May our hearts be filled with gratitude!"


Nicholas Beckman, Martha and Bill Beckman's son and one of six wonderful young men assigned to our local Church from The Way, is among the seminarians coming to the new Redemptoris Mater missionary seminary being founded this year in Philadelphia at my request.

Redemptoris Mater missionary seminary - similar to a "house of formation" as Americans usually understand the term - will not replace or compete with St. Charles Borromeo Seminary. Redemptoris Mater will have its own identity and rector. But St. Charles will continue to provide the academic formation for all our seminarians. And all our seminarians - both those who enter St. Charles under the traditional protocols, and those who are educated by St. Charles through Redemptoris Mater missionary seminary - will be equally "our" seminarians. Men of The Way ordained for Philadelphia will be fully and permanently Philadelphia priests, with the one footnote that a certain number will be released, as circumstances allow, for missionary service for a limited time in The Way, overseas or here in North America.

In the weeks ahead, I'll provide more details on the new Redemptoris Mater missionary seminary, and very positive developments at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary itself. In the meanwhile, as we seek to renew the tremendous legacy of Catholic life in Philadelphia, I ask you to pray for the six young men who have come from afar and committed their lives to serving the Church here in the Philadelphia region.

That's the kind of trust in God, the kind of courage, that can transform the world. And that's the kind of courage we now need as a Church - from all of us.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Celebrate 8th Annual Hispanic Heritage Mass The Mass Is Part Of Hispanic Heritage Month Celebrations In The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia.

October 7, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO CELEBRATE
8th ANNUAL HISPANIC HERITAGE MASS

The Mass is part of Hispanic Heritage Month celebrations in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will celebrate the 8th annual Hispanic Heritage Mass, commemorating the heritage and diversity of the Hispanic Catholic community in the Philadelphia region.

Saturday, October 12, 2013
9:30 a.m. (Procession)
10:00 a.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


The Hispanic Heritage Mass draws faithful from throughout the Archdiocese to celebrate the diversity and unity of the Hispanic Catholic community.

The Mass includes an entrance procession of national flags and banners depicting patron saints of the 20 Latin American countries of Hispanic heritage as well as the Papal and American flags.

Participants in the Mass are encouraged to dress in the traditional attire of their countries of origin. All are invited to attend.

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Editor's Note: For more information please contact Joann Roa, Director, Office for Hispanic Catholics at 215-667-2820.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Nutritional Development Services Receives Grant From W.w. Smith Charitable Trust

October 8, 2013

NUTRITIONAL DEVELOPMENT SERVICES RECEIVES GRANT
FROM W.W. SMITH CHARITABLE TRUST


Nutritional Development Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia (NDS) has been awarded a grant from the W.W. Smith Charitable Trust for $67,500. This total represents the highest amount NDS has received from the private foundation in recent years.

The grant will help NDS stock food cupboards for its Community Food Program, which helps contribute to the food needs of poor men, women and children throughout the five-county Archdiocese, without distinction of race, color or creed. The funds will also go towards purchasing food certificates to local grocery stores, which helps the Saint Monica's Elder Care program purchase food for senior citizens.

In 2012, the Community Food Program provided meals for 89,796 seniors, 186,613 adults and 156,528 children.

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Editor's Note: Nutritional Development Services' mission is to provide meals, food assistance and additional support to organizations serving children and the poor as an extension of the services and mission of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. For more information on NDS programs please visit www.ndsarch.org/.


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Nutritional Development Services Honors Longtime Catholic Social Services Employee And Former Administrator Of Casa Del Carmen

October 8, 2013

NUTRITIONAL DEVELOPMENT SERVICES HONORS
LONGTIME CATHOLIC SOCIAL SERVICES EMPLOYEE AND
FORMER ADMINISTRATOR OF CASA DEL CARMEN


Nutritional Development Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia (NDS) will recognize the family of Elena A. Santora, a long time Catholic Social Services employee and former administrator of Casa del Carmen, by naming the food cupboard located there in her honor.

Elena Santora was the administrator of Casa del Carmen for 18 months. Prior to that, Elena was the Director of the Migration and Refugee Resettlement program for the Archdiocese. She died suddenly in August 1991. Working under Monsignor Joseph Garvin, then Director of Catholic Social Services, Elena demonstrated a constant dedication to making a difference for the families served by Casa. Monsignor Garvin will preside at the dedication and blessing of the newly named Elena A. Santora Food Cupboard.

Elena's family shares her vision for all people to have access to healthy food and is committed to supporting the ongoing work of the food programs at Casa del Carmen. This effort was initiated by her family as a way to honor her legacy and work.

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Editor's Note: Nutritional Development Services' mission is to provide meals, food assistance and additional support to organizations serving children and the poor as an extension of the services and mission of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. For more information on NDS programs please visit www.ndsarch.org/.


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia To Celebrate Walking Pilgrimage Of Faith Faithful From Throughout The Philadelphia Region Will Travel To The Cathedral Basilica Of Saints Peter And Paul To Participate

October 8, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA TO CELEBRATE
WALKING PILGRIMAGE OF FAITH

Faithful from throughout the Philadelphia region will travel to the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul to participate


Catholics throughout the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will participate in a walking pilgrimage to the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul, offering public witness of their Faith and participation in the life of the Church as part of the Year of Faith observance.

Participants will gather with Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. to pray and praise at his weekly 6:30 p.m. Sunday Mass.

Sunday, October 13, 2013
5:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. (Prayer)
6:30 p.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Families, young adults and other parish groups will journey to the Cathedral on foot, by car, bus or train. Six parish Churches near the Cathedral have been established as landing sites from which to begin the Walking Pilgrimage. Each group of pilgrims will begin the pilgrimage with a brief Liturgy of the Word.

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Editor's Note: For more information on the Walking Pilgrimage please contact Meghan Cokeley, Director, Office for the New Evangelization at 215-587-5630 or visit phillyevang.org.

For a complete list of landing sites visit archphila.org/pilgrimagefaith/documents/InfoSheet.pdf


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Don Guanella Village To Host 15th Annual Charity Golf Classic

October 15, 2013

DON GUANELLA VILLAGE TO HOST 15TH ANNUAL CHARITY GOLF CLASSIC


Don Guanella Village is hosting its 15th Annual Charity Golf Classic. A program of the developmental services division of Catholic Social Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia (CSS) - Don Guanella Village provides residential and rehabilitation services for 131 developmentally disabled young adult males and men between the ages of 21 and 60.

Monday, October 21, 2013
8:30 a.m. (Registration and breakfast)
9:30 a.m. (Shotgun start)
Llanerch Country Club
950 West Chester Pike
Havertown, PA 19083 (Delaware County)


Last year the golf classic raised $33,000. Proceeds from the event will be used to create enriching residential environments in the community to meet the changing needs of the men and allow them to reach their fullest God-given potential.

The 2013 Tournament Sponsor is Citibank. Origlio Beverage in Philadelphia is the 19th Hole Sponsor.

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Editor's Note: For tickets, information on sponsorships and advertising opportunities contact Father Dennis Weber at 484-475-2467.


Contact
Annie Korp
Communications Assistant
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia To Celebrate World Mission Sunday

October 18, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA TO CELEBRATE
WORLD MISSION SUNDAY


Bishop John J. McIntyre will be the main celebrant and homilist at the annual World Mission Sunday Mass. This Mass commemorates the vital work of mission churches throughout the world and the support extended to their efforts by the faithful of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

Sunday, October 20, 2013
6:00 p.m. (Rosary for the Pontifical Mission Society)
6:30 p.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Prior to Mass, at 6:20 p.m., Bishop McIntyre will present an award to four winners of the 2012-2013 Missionary Childhood Association [MCA] Annual Christmas Artwork Contest. The winners are Melissa Mejia, Christopher Solis, Laila Bentley, and Sara Castagno. MCA is the Pontifical Mission Society for children.

One of the students, Melissa Mejia, is one of 24 national winners selected from thousands of entries in the National MCA Christmas Artwork Contest. The three other students will be recognized by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia for their artwork. Additionally, Mrs. Rebekah Coval will be recognized as a Second Place Winner in the Young Adult category of the first-ever Pontifical Mission Societies Song Contest.

During the weekend of October 19th and October 20th, missionaries will also be speaking in over 57 parishes throughout the Archdiocese on behalf of World Mission Sunday. Missionary groups such as the Cabrini Mission Corp, the Brothers of the Christian Schools, the SMA Lay Missioners, the Augustinians, the Little Sisters of Saint Francis, the Handmaids of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, the Maryknoll Fathers and Brothers, the Capuchin Franciscan Friars, the Medical Missionary Sisters and others will relate the importance of their missionary work throughout the world.

Through the generosity of its faithful, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia provided $1,623,804.85 to the Pontifical Mission Societies in 2012.

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Editor's Note: For more information, please contact the Archdiocesan Pontifical Missions Societies Office at 215-587-3944 or visit www.phillymissions.org.

For a complete itinerary of World Mission Sunday Mass visit World Mission Sunday Mass Itinerary.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary To Host Annual Open House One Of The Premier Houses Of Priestly Formation And Catholic Education In The Country Will Open Its Doors To The Public

October 18, 2013

SAINT CHARLES BORROMEO SEMINARY
TO HOST ANNUAL OPEN HOUSE

One of the premier houses of priestly formation and Catholic education
in the country will open its doors to the public


Seminarians will serve as hosts and tour guides as Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary opens its doors to the public for the annual open house.

12:00 p.m.
Sunday, October 27, 2013
Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary
100 East Wynnewood Road
Wynnewood, PA 19096


Future priests will guide tours through this historic Catholic landmark where visitors can choose from tours to view artwork treasures from the Seminary's collection or explore the daily life of seminarians and learn about educational programs open to the general public. Tours last 90 minutes each and begin at noon. The final tour starts at 3:30 p.m. Refreshments are available throughout the afternoon. Evening prayer and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament will begin at 5:00 p.m. in Saint Martin of Tours Chapel. It will be led by Bishop Timothy C. Senior, Rector of the Seminary.

Founded in 1832, Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary has been forming young men for priestly service to the community in the Catholic Church for more than 180 years.

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Editor's Note: For more information on Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary and the Open House, please visit http://www.scs.edu/ or call (610) 667-3394.


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Living The Gospel Of Life

October 18, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
LIVING THE GOSPEL OF LIFE


Exactly 15 years ago this fall, America's bishops issued a pastoral letter called Living the Gospel of Life. Even today, with the passage of time, this remains no ordinary Church text. I believed then, and I believe now, that it's the best document ever issued by the U.S. bishops on the priorities of Catholic engagement in our nation's public life. In writing it, the bishops sought to apply Pope John Paul II's great encyclical Evangelium Vitae ("The Gospel of Life") to the American situation. The heart of their statement, paragraph No. 23, stresses that:

"Opposition to abortion and euthanasia does not excuse indifference to those who suffer from poverty, violence and injustice. Any politics of human life must work to resist the violence of war and the scandal of capital punishment. Any politics of human dignity must seriously address issues of racism, poverty, hunger, employment, education, housing, and health care. Therefore, Catholics should eagerly involve themselves as advocates for the weak and marginalized in all these areas. Catholic public officials are obliged to address each of these issues as they seek to build consistent policies which promote respect for the human person at all stages of life.

"But being 'right' in such matters can never excuse a wrong choice regarding direct attacks on innocent human life. Indeed, the failure to protect and defend life in its most vulnerable stages renders suspect any claims to the 'rightness' of positions in other matters affecting the poorest and least powerful of the human community. If we understand the human person as the 'temple of the Holy Spirit' -- the living house of God -- then these latter issues fall logically into place as the crossbeams and walls of that house. All direct attacks on innocent human life, such as abortion and euthanasia, strike at the house's foundation. These directly and immediately violate the human person's most fundamental right -- the right to life. Neglect of these issues is the equivalent of building our house on sand. Such attacks cannot help but lull the social conscience in ways ultimately destructive of other human rights."


This is why the right to life is not merely one among many urgent issues, but rather the foundational one. It provides the cornerstone for a whole architecture of human dignity. Nothing has changed in recent months or years in Catholic thinking about the sanctity of human life. Nor can it. As America's bishops have stressed so many times, we have an obligation to work for human dignity at every stage and in every circumstance of human life. Here in Philadelphia, our Catholic social ministries model that dedication to the poor and disadvantaged in an extraordinary way.

But when we revoke legal protection for unborn children - when we accept the intimate violence abortion inflicts both on women and their unborn children; when we license and sacralize abortion as part of what Pope Francis calls a "throw away culture" -- we violate the first and most important human right, the right to life itself. And once we do that, and then create a system of alibis to justify it, we begin to put every other human and civil right at risk.

October is national Respect Life Month. It's a good time to remember the preciousness of all human life, beginning in the womb and continuing through natural death.

There are really two tragedies in every abortion: the killing of an unborn child; and the killing of an opportunity to love. God made us to be better than that.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary Announces Results Of Task Force Report And Defined Plans For Future Viability Plan Will Position The Seminary As The Premier Model Of Priestly Formation In The Country To Meet The Needs Of Our Church In The 21st Century.

October 23, 2013

SAINT CHARLES BORROMEO SEMINARY ANNOUNCES
RESULTS OF TASK FORCE REPORT
AND DEFINED PLANS FOR FUTURE VIABILITY

Plan will position the Seminary as the premier model of priestly formation in the country
to meet the needs of our Church in the 21st century.


In March 2013, a College Division Task Force was appointed by Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary's Board of Trustees to conduct a thorough review of its College Division and the future viability of that program. The task force's objective was to recommend a strategic plan to be implemented over the next three to five years to ensure a vibrant, sustainable house of formation and education for future generations of seminarians and lay students.

The task force recently completed its work and unanimously recommended that the Archdiocese of Philadelphia re-establish Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary College as a new, reborn, free-standing College seminary, welcoming students from the United States and beyond. By changing the structure and governance of the Seminary, Saint Charles Borromeo will be rebranded and marketed as a totally renewed institution, maintaining academic excellence and high standards of preparation for the evangelical and pastoral work of future priests. The servant leaders who emerge from the process of formation will be equipped to sow the seeds of the Good News and bring others to Christ in the complex and often secularized environment of our world.

"Implementing the recommendations of the task force will allow the College Seminary to grow in size and adapt to the needs of today's students," explains Bishop Timothy Senior, Rector of Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary. "We're taking a nationally recognized college program to the next level. Considering the overwhelming support and resources available to us, the potential for the College Seminary is unlimited."

The Seminary's Theology Division buildings, which will eventually house the entire Seminary community, will be repurposed into state-of-the-art facilities. To plan for this renovation, Saint Charles has engaged HHF, L.P. as a consultant for the Request for Proposals for the development of the buildings and property that currently house the College Division. HHF, L.P. will help ascertain the potential value of the portion of Seminary property which could be leased or sold. Renovations will also be funded in part by allocations from the Heritage of Faith Vision of Hope Capital Campaign, the sale of select pieces of artwork from the Seminary's collections, and a new capital campaign focused solely on the Seminary.

"The task force members and I acknowledge with gratitude Archbishop Charles Chaput and Bishop Timothy Senior for their trust and confidence in our work and its integrity," says Dr. Rosalie M. Mirenda, Chair of the Seminary College Division Task Force. "We pray that the work accomplished and the report provided are truly assistive to the Board of Trustees Of Saint Charles Seminary and that the College Program will stand as a distinctive institution of higher learning that enthusiastically welcomes students from our archdiocese, as well as across the United States and beyond, preparing them for life and for the journey to the priesthood."

Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary has served as a leading institution in the formation of Catholic men for the Priesthood in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and dioceses throughout the country for over 180 years. As the Seminary evolves in the coming years, the four pillars of human, spiritual, intellectual and pastoral growth will remain strong. The changes will allow the institution to serve as the premier and most complete house of priestly formation in the country.


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Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Priestly Formation And The Renewal Of Catholic Life

October 25, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
PRIESTLY FORMATION AND THE RENEWAL OF CATHOLIC LIFE


In every age the Church has the task of learning from and respecting the past without being captured by it. As the world changes, so do the pastoral needs of the Catholic community. In a city as rich in Catholic history as Philadelphia, we need to treasure the saints and achievements of previous generations. But real faith is more than nostalgia. We need to look ahead. We need to carry the legacy of the Church in Philadelphia forward by thinking and building creatively for the future today.

How do we do that? Renewing the Church takes more than fixing our financial problems and streamlining structures. These things are vital to good stewardship, and they can't be postponed or avoided. But they're not the heart of the matter. Love for Jesus Christ and zeal for sharing the Gospel: These are the things that count. All genuine institutional renewal drills down to the conversion and right formation of the human heart.

In the Catholic experience, that "right formation" begins with the priest, because in pastoring his people - teaching them, encouraging them, leading them in worship, sharing their sufferings and joys - the priest makes Jesus present to the community. As others have said before me, there's no presence of Christ in the world without the Church. There's no Church without the Eucharist. And there's no Eucharist without the priest.

This truth subtracts nothing from the heroic witness of religious women and men, and the immense sacrifices and apostolic service of married couples and lay singles. God makes the call to sainthood equally to every Christian from every vocation.

But the unique vocation of the ordained priest is to feed God's people with the body and blood of God himself; to shepherd God's priestly people as they seek to bring Jesus Christ to the world and the world to Jesus Christ. So again, the renewal of the Church begins first with a recommitment to strengthening and renewing the way we form our priests.

St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, one of North America's great centers of priestly formation, has prepared men as Catholic priests for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and dioceses throughout the country for more than 180 years. Earlier this week, St. Charles announced plans to revitalize its mission to shape servant leaders after the heart of Jesus Christ. This is very good news.

The seminary's Board of Trustees has reaffirmed a commitment to its College Seminary as a free-standing, residential college seminary program, welcoming students from the United States and beyond. St. Charles Borromeo College Seminary will improve and build on its tradition of academic excellence, while striking a healthy balance with human, pastoral and spiritual formation. Graduates will be readied on every level for theological studies in formation for the priesthood.

The seminary's goal of a dynamic, re-energized college program, tuned to the new and emerging pastoral realities of our day, requires that the historic theologate buildings be re-purposed into new, state-of-the-art facilities to house the College Seminary. The plan also includes the renovation of existing facilities which currently house the seminary's post-college Theology and Pre-Theology programs. Funding for this major project of upgrading and renovation will be provided by the Heritage of Faith/Vision of Hope Campaign; the sale of select pieces of seminary artwork; the lease or sale of a portion of the current seminary property; and a new capital campaign focused solely on the seminary. This is a significant undertaking -- but the long term benefits for the life of the Church in Greater Philadelphia are vastly more significant and life-giving than any costs.

Please pray for the success of these important efforts at St. Charles Borromeo Seminary and for the good men it will form in service to the Church. The future depends on God, but God looks to us - to our zeal and our generosity -- to do his work in the world.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: The Meaning Of Sainthood: To Be Fully Alive In Jesus Christ

October 31, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
THE MEANING OF SAINTHOOD: TO BE FULLY ALIVE IN JESUS CHRIST


Some years ago a friend told me that she secretly thought of the saints as boring. They smile at us sweetly from holy cards. Their lives can seem implausible compared to people more famous for their vices. And who would really want to be a saint, anyway? As Billy Joel once said, "I'd rather laugh with the sinners than cry with the saints. The sinners are much more fun."
But when we come to understand holiness rightly, we see that it's anything but boring. Sanctity isn't a matter of sentimental posturing or being nice. Sanctity is about being passionately in love with Jesus Christ.

The saints are men and women who glowed white-hot with the Holy Spirit. They lived fully what Father Richard John Neuhaus once called "the high adventure of Christian discipleship." And that's truly what the heart of sainthood is: not a life of legalistic drudgery, but a high adventure.

Think about the women and men we venerate as saintly: Mother Teresa, Francis Xavier, King Louis IX of France, Gianna Beretta Molla, Pier Giorgio Frassati, Catherine of Siena. They lived some of the most compelling lives in history. Their roads were hard. They endured great sacrifices and self-denial. But those sacrifices led to greater love and joy than many in the world have ever known.

If we think about sainthood like that, it can seem like the saints are a special class of people. Sainthood is for people like them, we think, not everyday people like us. And how do you live like a saint if you're just an ordinary worker, a father or a mother? The good news is that the saints were ordinary people like us. Their "secret" was not something they possessed, but Someone who possessed them.

The saints were men and women whom Jesus Christ made his own. As baptized Catholics, we too have been made Christ's own. We receive Jesus Christ's healing mercy and forgiveness in the sacrament of reconciliation. We eat his body and drink his blood in the Eucharist. We speak with him in moments of quiet prayer.

This love that we receive from Jesus should break out into the rest of our lives. St. Josemaria Escriva put it this way: "When a Christian carries out with love the most insignificant everyday action, that action overflows with the transcendence of God." This means that even when we fix another family's plumbing, or fill out their legal paperwork, or drive our kids to soccer practice, we can act with the love of Jesus Christ in the same way that the saints did.

The great second century bishop, Irenaeus of Lyons, once said that "the glory of God is man fully alive." First and foremost, this refers to Jesus Christ. Jesus shows us what it looks like for a human being to live life abundantly. This means that the closer we are to Jesus, the more intensely alive we become. And the saints are examples of men and women who have lived their lives to the fullest. Because of the love of Jesus, they glow with the glory of God. Because of the love of Jesus, they're fully alive.

The saints aren't just our models, though. They form what Paul called "a great cloud of witnesses" (Heb. 12:1). The saints in heaven pray for us on earth, urging us on as we run the race of faith. They offer us hope in two ways. First, they show us that, by God's grace, heroic Christian lives are possible. Second, they remind us of the destiny God has in store for those he loves. This life is a preparation for eternal union with God in heaven. That doesn't mean sitting around forever with a pious halo, strumming a harp. Heaven is an eternity of the greatest love we have ever tasted in this life - growing deeper and stronger without end.

This All Saints' Day, November 1, let's reflect on what the saints really mean for us. Let's remember the holy men and women whom we can emulate and to whom we can pray for help and guidance. Jesus said that he came so that we would have life, and have it abundantly (Jn. 10:10).

Let's pray that we find the courage to seek out that abundant life with the saints. Let's be women and men of love, witnesses of the glory of the God who makes us fully alive in Jesus Christ. There is no greater joy, no greater vocation.

###


Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Media Advisory - Photo Op- Archdiocesan Students And Nutritional Development Services Team Up To Fight Hunger 65,000 Pounds Of Peanut Butter And Jelly Collected To Stock Local Food Cupboards

October 31, 2013

-MEDIA ADVISORY - PHOTO OP-
ARCHDIOCESAN STUDENTS
AND NUTRITIONAL DEVELOPMENT SERVICES
TEAM UP TO FIGHT HUNGER

65,000 Pounds of peanut butter and jelly collected to stock local food cupboards


What:
Nutritional Development Services (NDS) of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will celebrate the successful completion of its 2013 Peanut Butter and Jelly Drive in conjunction with Archdiocesan schools and outreach programs on Monday, November 4, 2013 at Mater Dei Catholic School in Lansdale, Montgomery County.

NDS will recognize students from Mater Dei Catholic School, which is mainly composed of longtime NDS supporters Saint Stanislaus Parish, Saint Rose of Lima Parish and Saint Maria Goretti Parish. The Peanut Butter and Jelly Drive was coordinated by the school's Student Council and the Faith, Excellence, Service committee and was supported by Saint Stanislaus Religious Education program.

More than 65,000 pounds of PB&J have been collected since the beginning of the drive on September 9, 2013.

Students will present NDS the PB&J collected by their school:

When:
Monday, November 4, 2013 at 11:00 a.m.

Where:
Mater Dei Catholic School
493 E. Main Street
Lansdale, PA 19446 (Montgomery County)

Nutritional Development Services provides meals, food assistance and additional support to organizations serving children and the poor as an extension of the services and mission of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. The PB&J drive helps keep the 35 food cupboards serviced by NDS stocked with peanut butter and jelly for the year.

Key Visuals:

- Mater Dei students presenting their contribution for the PB&J drive to NDS representatives

- Additional quantities of PB&J collected at other schools


Key Participants:

- Rev. Msgr. Joseph Tracy, Pastor, Saint Stanislaus Parish
- Mrs. Diane McCaughan, Principal, Mater Dei Catholic School
- Student Council officers
- The Faith, Excellence, Service Committee chairs
- Lorraine M. Knight, Director of Nutritional Development Services
- Anne H. Ayella, Assistant Director for Community Relations, NDS
- Denise Hopkins, Administrator for Community Food Program, NDS

# # #


Editor's Note: To find out more about Nutritional Development Services visit www.nutritionaldevelopmentservices.org.

For more information about schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia visit www.catholicschools-phl.org.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Announces Freeze Of Lay Employees' Retirement Plan Effective June 30, 2014 This Action Will Enable The Archdiocese To Meet Its Obligations To All Current And Future Retirees; Current And Former Employees Will Experience No Loss Or Reduction Of Vested Benefits.

November 5, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA ANNOUNCES FREEZE OF
LAY EMPLOYEES' RETIREMENT PLAN EFFECTIVE JUNE 30, 2014

This action will enable the Archdiocese to meet its obligations to all current and future retirees; current and former employees will experience no loss or reduction of vested benefits.


Contextual Background

This July, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia published audited financial statements for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012. The financial statements disclosed a $39.2 million operating deficit for that period as well as several very significant and ongoing balance sheet liabilities that measure in the hundreds of millions of dollars.

Since his arrival in Philadelphia just over two years ago, Archbishop Chaput has repeatedly expressed his commitment to financial transparency and prudent stewardship of the resources of the Archdiocese. Beginning last summer, a series of steps were taken to begin to remedy Archdiocesan fiscal challenges. The Archbishop's residence along with a property in Ventnor, New Jersey, were both sold to provide necessary immediate cash flow. Many other actions followed including a reduction of 25% of the workforce at the Archdiocesan Pastoral Center in order to stem the operating deficit.

Additionally, an evaluation of various Archdiocesan real estate assets and operating entities was undertaken. This evaluation focused on assets that could potentially be used to remedy the unfunded balance sheet obligations. In August of this year, it was announced that the Archdiocese would market its six nursing homes and one assisted living facility for potential sale in addition to pursuing an outsourced management agreement and lease for its 13 cemeteries. Such an agreement regarding the cemeteries was reached and made public in late September.

None of those measures were taken lightly, but all were essential. In order for the Catholic Church to maintain a viable presence in the Philadelphia region and provide for all those in need through its various ministries, it must re-establish a firm financial foundation.

Background Regarding the Decision to Freeze the Lay Employees' Retirement Plan

Among the balance sheet liabilities outlined this past summer was the Lay Employees' Retirement Plan (LERP). At that time, it was underfunded by approximately $150 million (i.e. approximately $630 million in actuarially determined liabilities versus $478 million in plan assets).

While the funding level is sufficient to meet the current and medium-term benefit payments, action must be taken now to ensure that the Plan can meet its long-term obligations to future retirees.

As a result, the Archdiocese engaged a leading human resources and benefits consulting firm, to conduct an independent study of the plan with the objectives of assessing plan viability and the ability of the Archdiocese to maintain a defined benefit plan in the future. Following this study, a recommendation was provided to freeze the LERP. This recommendation was reviewed and accepted by the Board of the LERP and the Archdiocesan Finance Council. Final approval was made by Archbishop Chaput.

This decision is the latest in a series of actions taken by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia to help restore a solid financial foundation. It is part of the ongoing Archdiocesan effort to build the strongest possible Catholic Church in Philadelphia-one that will be sustainable now and far into the future.

Impact on Current Employees, Former Employees and Retirees

As a result of this action, no current or former employee vested in the plan will experience a loss in accrued benefit.

- All current employees will retain benefits they have earned and will continue to accrue benefits through the freeze date.
- Accrued pension benefits under the plan will not increase for current employees with additional service or increases in pay after the freeze date.
- The Archdiocese will continue to make contributions to the plan after the freeze date in order to fund all benefits accrued through the freeze date.
- All former employees who are vested in the plan will retain benefits they earned while serving the Archdiocese or an entity participating in the plan.
- All retirees currently receiving benefits will continue to do so with no loss, reduction or interruption of benefit.

Current employees learned of this news today. Information was provided to them by their immediate supervisors at their employment location. Former employees who are vested in the LERP and retirees currently receiving benefits will be sent notification via the mail.

Additionally, current employees will receive an individualized, estimated pension benefit statement in the mail after November 7th illustrating their accrued benefit as of June 30, 2013 so that they will be informed about their particular situation. A dedicated call center will be active beginning Tuesday, November 12th. Staff members will be available to receive inquiries about the LERP freeze and to assist current and former employees with any questions they may have. A final, actual pension benefit statement will be mailed to current employees after the freeze date. All of the information presented above was provided to employees today.

The Lay Employees' Retirement Plan: History and Statistics

The Lay Employees' Retirement Plan of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia was established in 1965 to assist those serving in the various entities and ministries of the Archdiocese in retirement. Currently, approximately 8,500 active employees are accruing benefits in the plan. Additionally, approximately 4,700 retirees are receiving retirement benefits and 4,350 former employees are vested and entitled to benefits from the plan.

The assets of the LERP are held in a trust entity that is separate from other Archdiocesan entities. The funds in the trust can only be used for their stated pension purpose.

A New Plan to Assist Employees in Retirement

Although the LERP is being frozen, the Archdiocese remains committed to assisting its employees in retirement. After the freeze date, the Archdiocese will establish what is known as a defined contribution plan for retirement.

This is a plan in which participants will have choices regarding how their funds are invested. When the defined contribution plan is implemented, the Archdiocese will contribute a percentage of each individual's annual compensation to their defined contribution plan account. While the amount of the Archdiocesan contribution will be discretionary and will be determined on an annual basis, a contribution of 4.5% of each employee's annual compensation is expected initially. Employees will also have the opportunity to make pre-tax contributions to their individual accounts in addition to the funds provided by the Archdiocese up to established limits set forth by the Internal Revenue Service.

Additionally, employee vesting in any Archdiocesan contributions to the defined contribution plan will occur after one year of service. Service prior to the establishment of the new plan will count toward this vesting requirement. Any employee who has already completed one full year of service, working 20 hours or more per week for at least five months per year will be vested immediately in the new defined contribution plan.

In the coming months, additional, detailed information about the defined contribution plan will be provided to current employees.

# # #


Editor's Note:
For additional information, including a copy of the Summary Plan Description for the Lay Employees' Retirement Plan and a document designed to answer many of the questions that will be asked most frequently about this action, please visit www.archphila.org.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Remembering Those Who Suffer For The Love Of Jesus Christ

November 6, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
REMEMBERING THOSE WHO SUFFER FOR THE LOVE OF JESUS CHRIST


November is a time to recall in a special way the souls of the faithful departed who've gone before us. Martyrs are among those we venerate, and they came from all walks of life. They were men and women, old and young, laypeople, priests and religious. Martyrdom means bearing witness to Jesus Christ by living, and when necessary dying, for our faith in Jesus Christ. As Jesus said, "Greater love has no man than this, that he lay down his life for his friends" (Jn 15:13). He spoke these words before he gave his own life for us on the cross, showing us exactly what he meant.

In giving their lives for Christ, martyrs follow in his footsteps. A prayer of the Early Church speaks of the martyrs rejoicing with Jesus in heaven because they poured out their blood for love of him. Martyrdom is ultimately beautiful because it shines with the love of God.

But in another sense, martyrdom is a grave injustice and a sign of sin in the world. Martyrdom involves attacks on Christian men and women precisely because of their belief in Jesus. Living in America today, we tend to think of persecution as something remote; something that happened to other Christians in other times. We're grateful for the freedom to practice our faith that belongs to our nation's heritage. Many other Christians are not so blessed. For many of our brothers and sisters around the world, living the faith comes at a bitter price. A Christian man loses his job or pays fines. A Christian woman is beaten or put to death. Even if we don't see it happening in our own churches, the 21st century is already an age of bloody martyrdom.

Christians in the Middle East bear a special burden of violence and bigotry. Head of the Chaldean Catholic community in Mosul, Iraq, Archbishop Amel Shamon Nona was appointed in 2010 after his predecessor was gruesomely murdered by Muslim extremists. He watched as month after month, more Christians fled his city. The brutal violence made him wonder how anyone can live the faith in a time of extraordinary suffering.

Archbishop Nona came to this conclusion: "During a time of crisis and persecution, we must remain full of hope." That may sound implausibly pious, but we need to hear his words in detail:

"I realized that, above all - in the face of suffering and persecution - a true knowledge of our own faith and the cause of our persecution is of fundamental importance. By deepening our sense of what it means to be Christians, we discover ways to give meaning to this life of persecution and find the necessary strength to endure it. . . . From the moment when we are waiting for death, under threat from someone who may shoot us at any time, we need to know how to live well. The greatest challenge in facing death because of our faith is to continue to know this faith in such a way as to live it constantly and fully - even in that very brief moment that separates us from death.

"My goal in all this is to reinforce the fact that the Christian faith is not an abstract, rational theory, remote from actual, everyday life but a means of discovering its deepest meaning, its highest expression as revealed by the Incarnation. When the individual discovers this possibility, he or she will be willing to endure absolutely anything and will do everything to safeguard this discovery - even if this means having to die in its cause."


What can we in the United States do for Christians around the world who are suffering persecution right now? Material support is an obvious need, and vitally important. But first and even more crucial, Archbishop Nona tells us, is this: Live the faith in a deeper way. Give suffering Christians the gift of knowing that their burdens encourage us to love Jesus Christ more. If we're free to live as members of the body of Christ, we should live our faith all the more vigorously for those who have no such freedom. The archbishop also urges us to protect our own religious freedom and to resist every attempt at intimidation that we face in our own country.

By living out our faith with courage and conviction, we too become "martyrs" in the truest sense of the word: witnesses to the love of Jesus Christ. Nothing less can soften the heart of the world and lead persons of good will to God.

Archbishop Nona's comments: http://www.nationalreview.com/node/362242/print. Material support for the Church in the Middle East can be sent to Aid to the Church in Need or the Catholic Near East Welfare Association.

# # #


Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia And The Magnificat Foundation To Host Magnificat Day 2013

November 6, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA AND THE MAGNIFICAT
FOUNDATION TO HOST MAGNIFICAT DAY 2013


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia, in collaboration with the Magnificat Foundation, is pleased to host Magnificat Day, a unique gathering for liturgical prayer, music, inspirational talks and reflection.

Saturday, November 9th, 2013
7:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Pennsylvania Convention Center
1101 Arch Street
Philadelphia, PA 19107


Thousands of faithful from around the country will hear presentations from Father Robert Barren, acclaimed author of the Catholicism series, and Father Peter John Cameron, o.p., Editor-in-Chief of Magnificat. Attendees will also have the opportunity to adore the Blessed Sacrament in the Adoration Chapel, receive the sacrament of Penance, and venerate the relics of the Little Flower, Saint Therese of Lisieux, and of her parents, Blessed Louis and Zelie Martin.

Magnificat Day will conclude with a Eucharistic Procession through the streets of Philadelphia from the Pennsylvania Convention Center to the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul. Anyone not able to attend Magnificat Day is still welcome to join the procession beginning at 5:00 p.m. by bringing a candle and meeting at the intersection of 17th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway. The procession will conclude with Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament in front of the Cathedral.

# # #


Editor's Note: For more details on the events of Magnificat Day 2013, please visit www.magnificatday.com.



AREA MASSES PRIOR TO THE OPENING
OF MAGNIFICAT DAY


7:15 AM Mass
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103/215-561-1313


Most Reverend Charles J. Chaput
Celebrant and Homilist


7:00 AM Mass
Convent of Divine Love

2212 Green Street
Philadelphia, PA 19130/215-567-0123

8:00 AM Mass
Saint Francis Xavier Church

24th and Green Streets
Philadelphia, PA 19130/215-765-4568

7:45 AM Mass
Saint John the Evangelist Church

(Lower Church)
21 South 13th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19107/215-563-4145

8:00 AM Mass
Saint Patrick Church

20th and Locust Streets
Philadelphia, PA 19103/215-735-9900

7:30 AM Mass
Saint Peter the Apostle Church

Shrine of Saint John Neumann
5th Street and Girard Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19123/215-627-2386


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Saint Francis De Sales School To Host University Of Notre Dame National Bus Tour

November 7, 2013

SAINT FRANCIS DE SALES SCHOOL TO HOST UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME NATIONAL BUS TOUR


Saint Francis de Sales Parish Elementary School (Philadelphia) will host the University of Notre Dame Fighting for Our Children's Future national bus tour. Saint Francis de Sales was chosen to represent Catholic schools in the Philadelphia area during the tour's stop in over 40 cities nationwide.

Saint Francis de Sales students will welcome Reverend Timothy Scully, C.S.C., founder of the University of Notre Dame's Alliance for Catholic Education (ACE), when the bus rolls into Philadelphia with students holding flags and blaring trumpets.


Tuesday, November 12, 2013
10:30 a.m.
Saint Francis de Sales School
917 South 47th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19143



A brief assembly will follow the welcome and will include students from several area Catholic schools, a showcase of Saint Francis de Sales School, brief remarks from graduates, and the presentation of the University of Notre Dame's Sorin Award for service to Catholic schools.

Ms. Christine Healey, President of the Healey Education Foundation will be the local recipient of the Sorin Award. The award is bestowed on a person who has contributed significantly to Catholic Education and is named for the founder of the University of Notre Dame, Reverend Edward Sorin, C.S.C.

###


Editor's Note: For information about Catholic Schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, please visit www.catholicschools-phl.org.

For more information on the University of Notre Dame's Alliance for Catholic Education program visit http://ace.nd.edu/.



Contact
Bonnie Olinger
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia To Hold Masses Of Remembrance For Immigrants Remembering Those Who Died Crossing The Border And Calling For Immigration Reform

November 8, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA
TO HOLD MASSES OF REMEMBRANCE FOR IMMIGRANTS

Remembering those who died crossing the border and calling for immigration reform


Parishes throughout the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will celebrate Mass on November 10, 2013 in remembrance of immigrants who have died crossing the border or remain separated from their families due to issues with the current immigration system. The Archdiocese of Philadelphia Office for Cultural Ministries invites all to join these parishes in praying for the passage of a just immigration reform.

Some of the participating parishes include:

Saint Patrick Parish
10:00 a.m.
Norristown, PA (Montgomery County)

Saint Ann Parish
6:00 p.m.
Phoenixville, PA (Chester County)

Saint Rocco Parish
6:00 p.m.
Avondale, PA (Chester County)

Our Lady of Hope Parish
All weekend masses
Philadelphia, PA

The Masses of Remembrance and Call for Immigration Reform began on November 2, 2013 in conjunction with el Dia de los Muertos (All Souls Day). They conclude November 10th.

The Office for the Vicar for Cultural Ministries (composed of the Office for Hispanic Catholics, Office for Migrant and Refugees, and Office for Black Catholics) supports through its various efforts the United States Catholic Bishops' comprehensive immigration plan and the Justice for Immigrants Campaign.

# # #


Editor's Notes: For information on the United States Bishops Justice for Immigrant Campaign visit http://justiceforimmigrants.org.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Seminarians From Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary To Run In Philadelphia Marathon

November 12, 2013

SEMINARIANS FROM SAINT CHARLES BORROMEO SEMINARY
TO RUN IN PHILADELPHIA MARATHON


The College and Theology Division seminarians of Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary invite the community to support them spiritually and financially as they participate in the annual Philadelphia Marathon and Half-Marathon on Sunday, November 17, 2013.

Made up of more than 20 seminarians, the "Race for Seminarians" team is running to raise financial support and awareness for the mission of Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary and priestly vocations. Seminarian and Deacon Chris Christensen brought together the first team of priests, seminarians and lay people ever to participate in the Marathon.

Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary has served as the leading institution in the formation of men for the Priesthood in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and dioceses throughout the country for over 180 years. This year, approximately 150 young men have answered God's call to attend the Seminary to be formed after the heart of Jesus Christ.

# # #


Editor's Note: Donations can be made to either a specific team member or the team as a whole. For more information on Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary's "Race for Seminarians" team and how to make a donation, please visit http://www.scs.edu/marathon.



Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communicationshttp://www.scs.edu/marathon
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput Calls For Relief Efforts To Support Typhoon Haiyan Victims

November 13, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT CALLS FOR RELIEF EFFORTS
TO SUPPORT TYPHOON HAIYAN VICTIMS


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has requested that all parishes in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia take up a voluntary, special collection on the weekend of November 23rd and 24th to support the continued relief efforts in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan that recently devastated the Philippines. Proceeds from the collection will assist immediate humanitarian needs and the cost of long-term reconstruction in the Philippine Islands.

All contributed funds will support Catholic Relief Services (CRS) efforts for typhoon victims and other victims of natural disasters. It is hoped that, as people take the opportunity to express gratitude for the blessings present in their lives, they will be as generous as possible to those who are still lacking basic necessities and common comforts.

# # #


Editor's Note: CRS is the official international humanitarian agency of the Catholic community in the United States. For information on CRS please visit www.crs.org.


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: The Feminine Genius: A Conference That Shouldn't Be Missed

November 14, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
THE FEMININE GENIUS: A CONFERENCE THAT SHOULDN'T BE MISSED


Over the past two years, we've spent a lot of time dealing with challenges in the life of our local Church. We've made good progress, thanks to the hard work of a great many people. But fixing problems isn't an end in itself. That's just a beginning. The point of our work is to clear away obstacles to the joy of knowing Jesus Christ and to a life rooted in the Gospel. We had a taste of that joy last weekend, November 9, with the wonderful success of the Magnificat Day gathering - a combination of beautiful worship, common prayer and great presentations. Events like Magnificat Day feed the soul and renew the hope at the heart of Catholic life.

We need a lot more of the same energy. And happily, more is on the way. On Saturday, December 7, the archdiocese will host a uniquely important Catholic women's conference, "The Feminine Genius: Every Woman's Gift." This will be a milestone in the life of our Church and a great way to begin preparing for the World Meeting of Families in 2015. I hope women around the archdiocese will visit the conference's website, review the scheduled content and make every effort to take part personally in the friendship, presentations and discussions of the day.

Women leaders are found in every walk of life: education, medicine, religious life, journalism, politics, business, law. But even more deeply, women as wives and mothers shape the future by forming their children -- and often their husbands - in the virtues of Christian faith, mercy, patience, understanding and unselfish love. Children need a loving father. Boys and girls alike need the example of good Christian men. But most of the best men I know got that way by living up to the expectations of the women they love. Every great priest has a special place in his life for his mother. Every good husband is the work of two women of character: his mother and his wife.

To put it another way: Women set the standard. Men might add to the standard or ignore it; but women define with the witness of their lives what words like compassion, justice, fidelity and human decency actually mean. Women, both lay and consecrated, create new life by nourishing others. Women are the irreplaceable heart and soul of every family. So if we want to renew our Church and wider community, the best way to start is by offering women a way to strengthen each other in the faith, and to rediscover the meaning of their God-given feminine identity and gifts.

Over the past few months, Meghan Cokeley, the director of our Office for the New Evangelization, has done heroic work to bring this conference together. The roster of wonderful keynote speakers includes Jeanette De Melo and Mother Agnes Mary Donovan, S.V.; Sister Virginia Joy, S.V., and Damon Owens on a dynamic youth track; along with a range of excellent breakout sessions led by experienced presenters like Danielle Bean, Sarah Christmyer, Kate Sweeney and others - with Kate Sweeney providing critical organizational support to the event.

I'm very grateful to the Knights of Columbus, Ascension Press and Our Sunday Visitor for helping to make this conference possible. I'm especially grateful to the staff and leadership of ENDOW (Educating on the Nature and Dignity of Women), whose work I greatly admire and who supported this gathering every step of the way. A national and now international ministry founded on Blessed John Paul II's vision of a new Christian feminism, ENDOW is a marvelous example of the great good that can be accomplished by committed Catholic women and men.

Bernard Lewis, the great scholar of Middle Eastern affairs, once wrote that a key strength of Christianity over Islam in the formation of the modern world has been its historic respect for the dignity of women. Women matter, profoundly, in the New Testament and throughout Christian experience. Yes, they've often been mistreated and undervalued even in Christian societies. But from the beginning, Mary has played a powerful role in Christian thought, and the list of Christian saints includes a vast number of women, great both in service and in intellect.

On December 7, I hope the women of Greater Philadelphia will come together to encourage each other and join in the renewal of the believing community we all share. "The Feminine Genius: Every Woman's Gift" is an opportunity that shouldn't be missed.

Learn more about the conference by visiting www.CatholicWomensConference.org. Learn more about ENDOW at www.endowgroups.org.


###


Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Releases Instrument To Engage Local Input In Preparation For 2014 Synod Of Bishops

November 15, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA RELEASES
INSTRUMENT TO ENGAGE LOCAL INPUT
IN PREPARATION FOR 2014 SYNOD OF BISHOPS


In preparation for the 2014 Extraordinary Synod of Bishops in Rome, the Holy See is inviting consultation of the clergy and faithful throughout the world on the theme of the upcoming council, The Pastoral Challenges of the Family in the Context of Evangelization.

Some of these challenges include widespread cohabitation, same sex unions, polygamy, a disregard for the equality and dignity of spouses, a weakened sense of the permanence of marriage, and the negative impact of the media and legislation on the meaning of Christian marriage and family.

Archbishop Charles J. Chaput O.F.M. Cap. has authorized the use of an Internet-based instrument for local participation in this consultation in the broadest possible manner. This is not a poll or a survey on Church teaching. Rather, this is a unique opportunity for the clergy and faithful of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia to reflect and respond thoughtfully on serious challenges to family life and to marriage.

Responses to the questions posed by the Vatican will provide data for the preparation of the 2014 Synod of Bishops, which will proclaim the Gospel teaching on family and marriage in the face of today's challenges.

More information on the 2014 Synod of Bishops and the form to provide input to these questions can be found here: http://archphila.org/synod2014/synod2014.php. Responses to the questions should be returned by Monday, December 2, 2013. All responses will be integrated into a general report by the Archbishop to help with the preparation for the 2014 Synod of Bishops.


# # #


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia And Endow To Host First Catholic Women's Conference In Philadelphia

November 18, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA AND ENDOW
TO HOST FIRST CATHOLIC WOMEN'S
CONFERENCE IN PHILADELPHIA


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia and Endow (Educating on the Nature and Dignity of Women) are pleased to announce the first-ever Catholic Women's Conference. The conference, titled: The Feminine Genius: Every Woman's Gift will welcome more than 500 women-married, single, and consecrated-from the Greater Philadelphia region.

Saturday, December 7, 2013
8:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Pennsylvania Convention Center
1101 Arch Street
Philadelphia, PA 19107


This conference is an initiative of Catholic women from various parishes in the Philadelphia region and will be co-hosted by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and Endow. The conference will welcome 10 nationally-renowned speakers, including Jeanette De Melo, editor-in-chief for the National Catholic Register, who will address Catholic perspectives on current news and issues affecting women.

The day will begin with Mass celebrated by Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. who affirms the significance of this gathering: "The Catholic Women's Conference opens a door to the most beautiful kind of renewal, the kind that comes from an authentic feminine leadership in the family, in the community, in business, in education, and in public life. I wholeheartedly support this event."

The conference also includes Youth and Spanish language tracks. Discounts for groups (10 or more) and high school students are available.

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Editor's Note: To learn more or to register for this event visit www.endowgroups.org/catholic-womens-conference/. Media inquiries should be directed to Melissa Squarcia with the Catholic Leadership Institute at 856-430-4661 or msquarcia@catholicleaders.org.


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary Launches Newly Redesigned Website

November 18, 2013

SAINT CHARLES BORROMEO SEMINARY LAUNCHES
NEWLY REDESIGNED WEBSITE


Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary is pleased to announce the launching of its newly redesigned website. The site, www.scs.edu, offers a fresh, vibrant design while continuing to provide pertinent information for current and perspective seminarians and lay students regarding Priestly Formation, the Permanent Diaconate Division, the Graduate School of Theology, and the Ryan Memorial Library.

Highlights of the website include recent Year of Faith lectures by Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. and Father Peter J. Cameron, O.P., as well as an online version of The Brook 2012-2013, the annual year-in-review publication of Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary. The recently published issue highlights the many exciting changes in progress at the Seminary.

Additional advancements include a newly established Twitter account, launched in unison with the updated website on November 8th, 2013. The twitter account can be accessed via https://twitter.com/StCharlesSem or by using @StCharlesSem. Similarly, the Seminary's Facebook account can be accessed via https://www.facebook.com/SCSeminary.

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Editor's Note: Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary has served as a leading institution in the formation of Catholic men for the priesthood in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and dioceses across the country for over 180 years. Established in 1832, the Seminary is comprised of four Schools of Learning: Seminary Theologate, Seminary College, School of Diaconate Studies and Graduate School of Theology. Students of the Seminary work toward academic degrees, catechetical certificates and more.


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Keynote Address The New Evangelization: Responsibilities And Challenges For The American Continent

November 18, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S KEYNOTE ADDRESS
THE NEW EVANGELIZATION: RESPONSIBILITIES AND CHALLENGES FOR THE AMERICAN CONTINENT


The full text presented below was delivered by Archbishop Chaput at a meeting of bishops from Canada, the United States, and Latin America in Mexico City on November 16th. This meeting was sponsored by the Pontifical Commission for Latin America.

Sixteen years ago today, November 16, I began my work as a delegate to the Special Assembly for America of the Synod of Bishops. Those weeks in Rome so many years ago, serving with brothers from around the hemisphere, were an extraordinary education and blessing. They've shaped the course of my life as a bishop ever since. Thanks to that meeting, I have on my desk at home a picture of Our Lady, Undoer of Knots, a gift from the then-coadjutor archbishop of Buenos Aires. As some of you may know, he has since gone on to other duties.

A lot has changed since 1997. The world is a very different place. For the Church in America, much of the change has been good. Dialogue between bishops North and South has grown. So has cooperation across borders. We differ in language and culture. But these differences are a gift, not an obstacle. As bishops, I think we understand as never before that our common Catholic faith is a bridge that abolishes the distance between us. The only thing that can separate us is our own unwillingness to live what we claim to believe about Jesus Christ and to strengthen the unity we find in him.

We need each other as brothers. And we need to remember that God is always with his Church. The millions of people, especially the young, who greeted Pope Francis so joyfully in Brazil this year were not a mirage. They were not an accident. They were the voice and soul of a continent. The human heart in every age, in every corner of the world, hungers for something more than itself - for something or Someone beyond the horizon of this life. Man needs God. So it has always been. So it will always be. And so too, the message of Jesus Christ will always be life-giving, and the mission of his Church will always remain urgent. As St. Augustine once said, the human heart is restless until it rests in God.

That's the good news. The more sobering news is this. Much of human history has resembled the drift of tectonic plates, with our learning and culture pushed forward on long, slow currents of time. That season is now over. We live today in a moment of colliding plates; a time unlike anything since the confusion and anxieties of the Reformation; a civilizational change that throws down the old and elevates the new with indifference. As a result, we need to see and respond to the world as it really is. We harm our people and deceive ourselves if we let ourselves become complacent; if we misread the shape of the world now emerging around us.

As Pope Francis told La Repubblica last month, the beginning and the end of life today can be times of equal desperation. The elderly are too often trapped in loneliness, while the young are "crushed under the weight of the present [without] a memory of the past and without the desire to look ahead to the future by building something; a future, a family." Crushed under the weight of the present: These are hard words, but they're true. And material, programmatic solutions to problems like these, no matter how good they might be, will never work unless they begin with direct human contact and the tenderness of Christian love.

My task today is to talk about the challenges and responsibilities of the American continent in the work of the new evangelization. Blessed John Paul II's apostolic exhortation, Ecclesia in America, did this in a comprehensive way in 1999. I don't need to repeat its content here.

But we do need to recall that, in his text, John Paul paid special attention to the words "From those who have received much, much will be required" in the Gospel of Luke (12:48). That passage applies not just to the wealthy and powerful persons in our care. It also applies to all of us - we bishops who have the privilege of serving and leading the Church. Ecclesia in America reminds us that "the greatest gift which America has received from the Lord is the faith which has forged its Christian identity" (14). Part of the stewardship of that faith is in our hands. And God will hold us accountable for it.

The challenges we face as a Church in America - pastoral, social, economic and political - are as many as they are serious. I want to focus briefly today on three of those problems. The first two are poverty and drugs. I'll turn to the third problem in due course. But when we speak of "poverty and drugs," we probably need to understand those words in a much broader sense than we normally use them.

Ecclesia in America speaks of "social sins which cry to heaven" because they demean human dignity and create hatred and division (56). Poverty is an acid that destroys human kinship. It burns away the bonds of mutual love and obligation that make individuals into a community. The United States is the richest, most powerful nation in history. But one in every six persons in my country now lives below the poverty line. And poverty always, inevitably comes with a family of other ugly issues: hunger, homelessness, street crime, domestic violence, unemployment, human trafficking.

All of these evils now belong to the shadow side of both urban and rural life in my country. They eat away at our sense of justice. They undermine the integrity of our public discourse. The trouble is that the economy of the United States still succeeds so well for so many of its people that the poor become invisible. And being invisible, they can be ignored.

Of course, poverty in the United States is one thing. Poverty in the favelas of Brazil is another. Many people in my country - even when they understand the economic inequalities of Latin America - have no real experience of the human suffering involved. Many of us who live in the North have no experience of poor health care, poor education, poor housing, poor sanitation, no electricity, serious corruption or mass unemployment - at least, not on the scale common to some other countries of America. We have no experience of crippling foreign debt that prevents basic development. And we have no experience of the gulf between rich and poor that exists in other regions of the hemisphere.

None of this subtracts from the economic and political progress made across the continent in recent years. But it does reveal to us another kind of poverty. I mean the moral poverty that comes from an advanced culture relentlessly focused on consuming more of everything; a culture built on satisfying the self; a culture that runs on ignoring the needs of other people. That kind of poverty, as Mother Teresa saw so well, is very much alive in my country. It's like a parasite of the soul. It leaves us constantly eating but constantly hungry for something more - all the while starving the spirit that makes us truly human.

And like material poverty, moral poverty has consequences. It brings fear of new life, a turning away from children, confused sexuality and broken marriages. It results in greed, depression, ugliness and aggression in our popular culture, and laws without grounding in truth. Real human development takes more - much more - than better science, better management and better consumer goods, though all these things are wonderful in their place. Human happiness can't be separated from the human thirst for meaning. Material things can't provide that meaning. Abundance can murder the soul as easily as scarcity can. It's just a different kind of poverty. This is why Ecclesia in America rightly wondered "whether a pastoral strategy directed almost exclusively to meeting people's material needs has not in the end left their hunger for God unsatisfied, making them vulnerable to anything which claims to be of spiritual benefit" (73).

To paraphrase C.S. Lewis, the devil is happy to cure our fevers if he can give us cancer in the process. To heal a suffering man is a noble and beautiful thing. But there's a difference between dulling his pain, and making him whole and well.

Likewise, solving poverty of the body by replacing it with a starving soul is not a solution. Marx called religion the opiate of the people. But the real opiate of the people - the coca leaves of modern culture that we're all expected to chew - is the river of consumer comforts and distractions that we use to damp down our deeper hunger for God and our gnawing sense of obligation to so many other people.

Modern life in developed countries is becoming a cocoon of narcotics, from pornography and abortion to crack cocaine. And that brings us to the issue of drugs, the second of the three problems I mentioned at the start. In a way, drugs are just the symptom, not the root cause, of a deeper social dysfunction. Poverty is the more fundamental problem in understanding a troubled society. But the two issues are closely linked. Poverty drives despair, which seeks relief in drugs. Drugs destroy lives, which end up in poverty and crime. The two problems feed on and compound each other.

All of us here know the impact of the drug trade on the life of our continent. Ecclesia in America lists it among the sins that cry out to heaven for justice. Drug-related violence has killed tens of thousands of people. Drug money deforms entire economies. It cripples development. It corrupts law enforcement agencies. It poisons the courts and the political process. It spreads poverty and despair. It traps women and children in prostitution. And it robs young people of the future.

Something genuinely hellish resides in every transaction that profits from the suffering of an innocent young person. That same hellishness infects every man and woman complicit in sustaining the criminal drug industry, from wealthy consumers in New York, to cartel bosses in Mexico, to chemists in the jungles of Colombia. The United States bears special responsibility for the problem because of its enormous demand for the illegal substances. And as Pope Francis stressed in his visit to Brazil earlier this year, decriminalizing the drug trade will not control or solve the drug scourge. Only deeper social and personal reform can do that.

Of course, none of these words about poverty and drugs is new. They've all been said before, and said better, by others. The point I want to make in saying them again is that poverty, drugs and so many of the other painful issues facing our people both derive from and make worse a larger crisis of the spirit. It's a crisis of identity and purpose. It touches every corner of the American continent. It crosses every border and language group. And it brings us to the third of the three problems I hope we can discuss with each other during this pilgrimage.

The third problem is we ourselves; each of us as a believer and bishop; our limitations; our weaknesses. God called us to lead. The Church ordained us to lead. Therefore we're responsible. Yes, we bishops didn't create the world in which we now live. Yes, we don't control most of the factors that will shape the world tomorrow. I also don't pretend to understand the unique and serious pressures my Latin American brothers face that I don't. I ask your indulgence for that, and I hope you will add to and correct what I say here according to your experiences.

But I do know that when I spoke at the Special Assembly for America 16 years ago, I spoke from a moral consensus in the United States that was still largely Christian. Today that is no longer the case. I do know that the mass media of the United States shape the appetites, beliefs and prejudices of much of the rest of the world - including Catholic young people - and with few exceptions, these media are no friend to the Catholic faith.

I do know that Mass attendance and sacramental practice have been declining for decades in many North American dioceses, well before the clergy abuse crisis of recent years. And I do know that millions of Catholics in my country and Canada are baptized and even catechized, but they don't know Jesus Christ - and therefore, for many of them, the language of Catholic Scripture, Catholic worship and Catholic moral reasoning is incomprehensible.

Again, we bishops are responsible - not for every failure; not for every mistake; and not for things over which we have no influence or control. But we do have the duty to examine ourselves and our work honestly; to correct each other frankly; to reform our hearts; and to give our lives zealously, completely, without counting the cost, to serving God and our people. A friend once sent me a line from the English poet, T.S. Eliot, and it has stayed in my memory ever since: For us, there is only the trying. The rest is not our business. Success in the work of evangelization belongs to God, in his own time, in his own way. But the work belongs to us, now. And it needs to involve more than passing along good doctrine. It needs to lead our people - including the well-catechized - to embrace Jesus Christ and his teaching in a new, more personal way.

I want to turn now, in this last part of my comments, to the duties we have as a body of Catholic brothers in the task of the new evangelization. And we might begin with a few words from Augustine, who served the Church as a bishop in a world not unlike our own. In his Sermons, Augustine once wrote:

Whoever does not want to fear, let him probe his inmost self. Do not just touch the surface; go down into yourself; reach into the farthest corner of your heart.

Here's what that means.

In an immediate sense, we need to be honest - and at times, that will mean self-critical - in the workgroup sessions that lie before us tomorrow. For example, Ecclesia in America rightly notes that "one of the reasons for the Church's influence on the Christian formation of Americans is her vast presence in the field of education, and especially in the university world … Another important area in which the Church is present in every part of America is social and charitable work" (18). The achievements of Catholic higher education in America are beyond question. But it's also true that today, some Catholic universities and colleges, and some Catholic charitable ministries, seem to be "Catholic" in name only. Are we willing to admit this? And are we willing to do something about it?

The title of the session I chair tomorrow - Workgroup 8 - is "The missionary activity of the Church in colleges, universities and institutes of higher education." It may very well be that the Church's missionary outreach at secular institutions is now more fruitful and a better use of resources than her presence on the campuses of many self-described "Catholic" universities. And I find that curious and sad.

In the longer term, we need to grasp that the "new" evangelization is finally very much like the "old" evangelization. We need to understand the hopes and fears of today's world, and especially its young adults. And we need to master the new technologies and methods to reach people as they are today. But programs and techniques don't convert the human heart. Only the witness of other people can do that. We can't give what we don't have. If we as bishops don't have a passion for Jesus Christ, a zeal for his Church and humility about our own weaknesses, then we'll never be able to set others on fire with the Gospel. Our own tepid hearts and pride will block the way.

We also need to see that the longer our history is as a local Church, and the greater our Catholic legacy and institutions might be as a diocese, then the more encumbered we are by nostalgia, and the harder it is to think creatively about the future. The past is important. We need to remember and revere it. It anchors us in the on-going story of the Church and gives us our identity. But the past cannot be allowed to capture us. The past too easily becomes a kind of aerodynamic drag; an enemy of the nimbleness and radicalism we need in touching the lives of other people with our Christian witness.

If this temptation to inertia is true about the Church in Philadelphia after 250 years - and too often it is - then we need to be equally frank about the Church elsewhere in America, where her structures and history are much older.

We need, finally and urgently, to work together more closely to protect the dignity of families who find themselves caught between the poverty of their lives in the South and immigration laws in the North that often seem incoherent, unreasonable and even vindictive. To borrow again the words of Pope Francis, too many immigrants find themselves "crushed by the weight of the present" - a present marked by gridlock in Washington, ambivalence and fear among many people in the North, and a pressing need to build a better life among so many people in the South.

The right to life begins with the unborn child. Nothing can excuse the violence or mitigate the evil of abortion. In my country, the cult of abortion has poisoned our laws, our public discourse and even the faith and integrity of many people who consider themselves Christians.
But the right to life continues beyond the womb. To thrive, children need families with a mother and father; and the integrity of the family depends on the freedom of parents to seek work, earn an honest wage, and support each other and the children that God sends to them.

Laws that cripple a family's right to survive and find work, even across borders when necessary, attack the family itself. And in harming the family, bad laws attack the basic cell of human society. The rights of the family connect intimately to the issue of justice in today's immigration debates. And in that spirit, I ask you and your people to please, please join us in Philadelphia in 2015 for the next World Meeting of Families. The world urgently needs to see a witness of Christian family solidarity from across our continent - hundreds of thousands strong - that transcends language, color, culture and borders.

I want to conclude with this last thought.

More than 500 years ago, men came from the Old World of Europe to the New World of America. They brought with them their pride and avarice, their illnesses and sins. But they also brought a treasure beyond price - the Word of God, the Gospel of Jesus Christ. And this continent we now share is different and better because of it. My own Native American ancestors, people of the Prairie Band Potawatomi tribe, heard the Gospel preached by Holy Cross and Jesuit missionaries and chose to be baptized. They passed down to me the greatest gift of my life, my Catholic faith.

The New World of the conquistadors became, in too many ways, a world of power and greed and the abuse of human dignity. In our day, God calls us to build a new "New World" - a world of mercy, justice, patience and love. A new "New World" founded on the words of his Son: "Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they shall be satisfied. Blessed are the merciful, for they shall obtain mercy. Blessed are the pure in heart, for they shall see God. Blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God. Blessed are those who are persecuted for righteousness' sake, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven" (Mt 5:6-10).

The biggest obstacle to that new "New World" is not the enemies who hate us, and not the unbelievers who revile the Church and the Gospel. The biggest obstacle is the Old World that lives in our own hearts, even in those of us who are bishops, and maybe especially in some of us who are bishops: our pride, our cowardice, our lack of trust in the promises of God.

Jesus said, "Behold, I make all things new" (Rev 21:5). We need to make those words come alive in the flesh and blood of our own lives; and in the passion of our own Christian witness. In these final days of the Year of Faith, as we pray together here at Mary's great shrine, may Our Lady of Guadalupe, the Star of the New Evangelization, lead each of us to be made new in her Son - Jesus Christ the Word of God; Jesus Christ the Lord, Jesus Christ the King of this world, and all worlds.


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Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia And World Meeting Of Families - Philadelphia Board Announce Executive Director And Director Of Event Services For 2015 World Meeting Of Families

November 21, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA AND WORLD MEETING
OF FAMILIES - PHILADELPHIA BOARD ANNOUNCE
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR AND DIRECTOR OF EVENT SERVICES
FOR 2015 WORLD MEETING OF FAMILIES


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia and the World Meeting of Families - Philadelphia Board announced today the appointment of Mrs. Donna Farrell as Executive Director and Mr. Jack O'Brien as Director of Event Services for the Eighth World Meeting of Families (WMOF). Both will be employed by the World Meeting of Families - Philadelphia, an independent entity governed by a board of directors comprised of lay people. It was formed to plan and undertake the activities relating to this global event.

"The Archdiocese of Philadelphia and the World Meeting of Families are extremely fortunate to have the expertise of both Donna and Jack in spearheading this historic event," said Robert Ciaruffoli, President of the World Meeting of Families-Philadelphia Board. "Their work is integral to our efforts to ensure that the 2015 World Meeting of Families is a moment of grace and solidarity for our Church that enriches the lives of all those who will visit the Philadelphia region from around the world.

It's an opportunity like no other to showcase the uniqueness of this city and all that it has to offer on both a national and international basis. It's also a tremendous opportunity for evangelization and a blessing for the local economy, which will certainly benefit from this event on many levels. We are very excited that Donna and Jack have joined us to help make the World Meeting of Families a global success."


Mrs. Donna Farrell, Executive Director, World Meeting of Families-Philadelphia
Mrs. Donna Farrell returns to a role involving the Archdiocese of Philadelphia from Independence Blue Cross where she has served as Manager of External Affairs since 2012. There, she was responsible for overseeing public relations as well as coordination of national and regional media coverage of the largest health insurer in southeastern Pennsylvania.

Prior to that time, she served the Archdiocesan Office for Communications beginning in 1999. From 2005-2012, she was Director of Communications. This past May, Farrell received the papal honor, Cross Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice, (Cross for the Church and Pontiff) for her unwavering service to the Church. Her dedication to the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and the Catholic faith was consistently evident through her efforts to highlight the good works of the local Church and promote Catholic values and teachings. Over the course of nearly 14 years, she devoted countless hours to managing internal communications and media relations surrounding many of the largest challenges the Archdiocese has faced in its history. Her appointment is effective January 2, 2014.

"I am deeply honored by this appointment and grateful for the opportunity to be part of such an historic event for the Archdiocese and for Philadelphia," said Farrell. "As Archbishop Chaput has noted, the World Meeting of Families will require a great deal of planning, organization, and hard work so I am eager to get started and hit the ground running. For everyone in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and all of those who will visit from around the world, our goal will be an experience that is powerful, grace-filled, and transformational."

Mr. Jack O'Brien, Director of Event Services, World Meeting of Families-Philadelphia
Mr. Jack O'Brien brings more than 20 years of experience in hospitality, event planning, and project management to this event. He most recently served as Principal at Manask & Associates and MANASK Hospitality Group, where he provided expert guidance and support to improve financial and operational performance in the hospitality industry. Prior to that, O'Brien worked for ARAMARK beginning in 1995, and most recently as President of Convention Centers, Retail, Facilities & Culinary Operations of the Sports and Entertainment Group. His responsibilities included managing their North American Conference Center, Retail Merchandise and Facility Services operations. He also provided leadership, motivation, mentoring and corporate guidance to senior managers in each discipline. O'Brien managed all aspects of the 2000 Republican National Convention in Philadelphia for ARAMARK Corporation, coordinating all activities held at the First Union (now Wells Fargo) Center and at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. His appointment is effective December 2, 2013.

"I was thrilled when it was announced that the Archdiocese of Philadelphia had been selected to host the Eighth World Meeting of Families," said O'Brien. "And what better City than Philadelphia, known as much for the rich diversity of its neighborhoods and people as it is for its religious, historic and cultural destinations, as the first ever-American site for this world family gathering."

He continued, "We all look forward to welcoming families from around the world to this historic gathering in 2015. We also recognize that an event of this size, scope and importance requires significant work and planning and I am very excited to have been asked to assist in that process."


Since its inception by Blessed John Paul II in 1994, the World Meeting of Families has sought to strengthen the sacred bonds of family across the globe. Each World Meeting of Families aims to emphasize the Good News of the family and highlight its intrinsic value to the good of society.

The World Meeting of Families draws a global audience. In Milan for the Seventh World Meeting, 153 nations were represented, 350,000 attended the Feast of Testimonies and more than one million participated in the Mass celebrated by the Holy Father. Beginning in 1994, during The Year of the Family, the Pontifical Council has been responsible for organizing the World Meetings of Families in Rome (1994); Rio de Janeiro (1997); Rome (2000); Manila (2003); Valencia (2006); Mexico City (2009); Milan (2012); and now, Philadelphia (2015).

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Editor's Note: For more information regarding the World Meeting of Families in Philadelphia in September 2015, please visit www.archphila.org or www.WorldMeeting2015.org.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Marriage, Family And Some Help For Pope Francis

November 22, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
MARRIAGE, FAMILY AND SOME HELP FOR POPE FRANCIS


In less than two years -- exactly 22 months -- the Church in Philadelphia will host the Eighth World Meeting of Families. Aside from a press conference last year and the kind public support of Governor Tom Corbett and Mayor Michael Nutter, so far the event has seemed well over the horizon; something to pleasantly daydream about without too much anxious detail.

That's about to change. Earlier this week, two key hires occurred related to the event. While each new "World Meeting of Families" is the work of the Pontifical Council for the Family, the local community handles much of the planning and execution. So it will be here in Philadelphia. I'm very pleased that Mrs. Donna Farrell has agreed to serve as executive director of all locally based efforts for the event, and Mr. Jack O'Brien will assist her as director of event services. Both will report to the board of directors of the independent "World Meeting of Families -- Philadelphia" entity which is already in action.

Starting in December, the pace of planning for the meeting -- outreach to community leaders, the formation of programming teams, etc. -- will sharply increase. And while the Vatican never announces the travel commitments of a Pope until much closer to an event, we definitely hope and pray that the Holy Father will join us in September 2015. Whatever happens, the World Meeting of Families will be a major highpoint in the life of our archdiocese and our city.

Pope Francis clearly has a heart for ordinary people. For most persons, family issues figure heavily in their sense of purpose, their happiness or their distress. But in our day, marriage and the family face a wide range of moral, legal, social and economic challenges. Even their definition is a matter of dispute.

It's no surprise then that Pope Francis has called an extraordinary general assembly of the Synod of Bishops next year, in October 2014. The assembly will examine the popular reception of Church teachings on marriage and the family, assess the problems of putting them into practice, identify which teachings are most criticized and ignored, and consider how best to communicate them. The findings of this extraordinary assembly will set the stage for another general assembly of the Synod of Bishops the following year, in 2015, which will focus on pastoral strategies and guidelines for dealing with marriage and family issues.

To get ready for the 2014 extraordinary assembly, Rome sent a document to all dioceses worldwide (see it posted here http://archphila.org/synod2014/pdf/SynodPrepDocENG.pdf) reflecting briefly on the nature of marriage and the family, and the current pressures facing both. It invited bishops to respond to a series of nine pastorally related questions and to consult widely in developing their replies. The responses will help shape the extraordinary assembly's agenda and discussions next October.

Rome has stressed that this process of consultation is not a referendum on the truth of Catholic teaching. But it will be a good tool in naming the problems that interfere with a strong Christian marriage and family, and in making the Church's message more effective. At my request, we've posted an online questionnaire here. The questionnaire items have been modified somewhat, without changing the intent of the original Roman document, in order to make them more accessible to everyday lay Catholics. I ask you to please take the time to fill out and submit the online questionnaire (http://archphila.org/synod2014/synod2014.php) before December 2, because your answers will have a direct effect on the report I send to the Vatican next month.

Equally important, your responses will be enormously valuable as we begin developing the content for the 2015 international gathering of families in Philadelphia. So your thoughts and concerns matter to our local Church in a very practical way.

Please keep Pope Francis in your prayers as he deals with these sensitive issues. And please pray as well for the great adventure that lies ahead: the World Meeting of Families.


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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia To Close Year Of Faith With A Solemn Mass The Year Of Faith Called All Catholics To A Renewed Conversion To The Lord

November 22, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA TO CLOSE
YEAR OF FAITH WITH A SOLEMN MASS

The Year of Faith called all Catholics to a renewed conversion to the Lord


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will close the Year of Faith in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia with a Solemn Mass at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul.

Sunday, November 24, 2013
11:00 a.m.
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


The Year of Faith, celebrated worldwide, commemorated the 50th anniversary of the opening of the Second Vatican Council and called all Catholics to reflect upon and renew their relationship with Jesus Christ. It concludes on the Solemnity of Christ the King, November 24, 2013.

Observance of the Year of Faith, throughout the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, included the Catholic Life Congress (an annual convocation of the laity, religious, deacons, and priests for ongoing faith formation), as well as the Year of Faith Lecture Series presented by Archbishop Chaput and other renowned Catholic leaders, and A Time of Grace Parish Evangelization Formation Series, a three course formation series examining the major themes of the Year of Faith, Vatican II documents and other texts.

Parishioners were encouraged to give public witness to their faith throughout the year. Some of these activities included a walking pilgrimage of faith to the Cathedral Basilica, outdoor prayer vigils and rallies. Catholics were also invited to celebrate the great Catholic tradition of charity as well as to share testimonies of faith in short videos now available on the Year of Faith website, archphila.org/yearoffaith/.

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Editor's Note: For more information on the Year of Faith Closing Mass contact Meghan Cokeley, Director, Office for the New Evangelization at 215-587-5630 or visit http://www.phillyevang.org/.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Statement Regarding Mr. Sean Fitzherbert

November 25, 2013

STATEMENT REGARDING MR. SEAN FITZHERBERT


Late last week, administration at Roman Catholic High School received an allegation that its Athletic Director, Mr. Sean Fitzherbert, had engaged in inappropriate conduct via computer technology with a minor attending Father Judge High School.

In accordance with Archdiocesan policy, this information was shared with the Philadelphia Police Department, Special Victims Unit, which is handling the ongoing investigation.

Mr. Fitzherbert is currently on administrative leave, meaning that he is relieved of all duties within the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Prior to beginning employment at Roman Catholic High School in July 2013, his criminal record checks and child abuse clearances were obtained. Mr. Fitzherbert also participated in the Archdiocesan Safe Environment Training Program. He was not previously employed by any Archdiocesan entity.

Information regarding this situation was communicated to the Roman Catholic and Father Judge High School communities this afternoon.

To Make a Report

If you have information to report to law enforcement regarding this situation, please call the Philadelphia Police Department, Special Victims Unit, at 215-685-3251.

If you would like to report an allegation of sexual abuse, contact your local law enforcement agency and/or the Archdiocesan Office of Investigations at 1-888-930-9010.

If you would like to report a violation of The Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries, please contact the Office of Investigations.

We recognize that this public notice may be painful to victims of sexual violence. If you need support or assistance, victim services are available to you through the Victim Assistance Office of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia at 1-888-800-8780.

###


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: The Gift Of Thanksgiving And The Advent Season

November 27, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
THE GIFT OF THANKSGIVING AND THE ADVENT SEASON


Thanksgiving is a good time to step back from the pressures of work, reflect on the course of our lives and remember that gratitude is the beginning of joy. It's also an opportunity to remember whom we're thanking, and why we're thanking him. The holiday has vividly Christian roots, and it makes little sense without its religious origins. Americans certainly don't need to be Christian to enter into the spirit of the day, but Thanksgiving reminds us of a fundamentally higher reality: our dependence on a loving Creator.

In a world so often marked by suffering and want, God has blessed us with abundance - both as a nation and as individuals. No one "owes" us this abundance. Other people around the world work just as hard as we do, or harder, and receive far less from life. As Scripture says: To whom much is given, from them much will be required (Lk 12:48). Thus we Americans have the privilege to turn our hearts to God in gratitude, but we also have God's invitation to share our abundance with those who have less than we do.

This weekend, on December 1, we also celebrate the First Sunday of Advent, which opens the new Church year. It's a chance to begin again; a time to examine our hearts in the light of the Gospel, repent of our sins and look for the coming of our Savior.

We can't really experience or understand Christmas unless we first conform our hearts to the longing of Advent. Advent calls us all to refocus our lives on God's promise of deliverance and the flesh-and-blood reality of Jesus Christ, our Deliverer - who came to us first in Bethlehem, comes to us today in the Eucharist, and will come again at the end of time.

As the Church reminds us throughout our lives, our Catholic faith, if it's genuine, must have consequences - first in our private choices and conduct, but also in our public witness. If we really believe in the coming of a Messiah, our lives will reflect that in the way we treat our families, our friends and business colleagues, the poor, the homeless and the suffering.

Real faith will drive us to live our lives in a spirit of humility, hope and courage, as Mary of Nazareth did. It will also guide us to press our elected leaders - of both political parties -- for laws and social policies that respect the dignity of the human person, from conception to natural death.

Jesus, Mary and Joseph knew the reality of poverty firsthand. They knew the fear of being without shelter; of being hunted by enemies and being "strangers in a strange land" as refugees in Egypt. This week might be a good time to remember that millions of immigrants in our own country - many of them undocumented; men and women who in many ways underpin our economy - feel that same uncertainty and vulnerability. That's why continuing efforts at immigration reform are so urgently necessary and so in need of Catholic involvement.

But immigration is only one of a dozen pressing issues like defending the unborn child, religious liberty, strengthening marriage and the family, and support for the elderly and disabled, which now face our country and cry out for prayer and action by Christians. All genuinely Catholic action begins and ends in the worship of Jesus Christ. If we want to change the world, we begin by saying "yes" to God, as Mary did. We begin with our own obedience to God, using Mary as our model.

The Thanksgiving holiday and the season of Advent give us a chance to start over; to begin the new Church year with a longing for God that leads to Bethlehem, to our own renewal, and to the conversion of the world.

So may God grant all of us the gift of his presence around the Thanksgiving table. And may God stay with us in the weeks ahead, as we ready ourselves for the birth of his son.

###



Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Holds 26th Annual Retirement Fund For Religious Collection

December 4, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA HOLDS 26TH ANNUAL
RETIREMENT FUND FOR RELIGIOUS COLLECTION


The 26th Annual Retirement Fund for Religious Collection will be held at parishes throughout the Archdiocese of Philadelphia on the weekend of December 7-8, 2013. This effort is coordinated by the National Religious Retirement Office and offers financial support for the day to day care of over 34,000 senior Catholic sisters, brothers, and religious order priests throughout the country.

Last year, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia contributed over $144,000 to this collection. In 2013, local religious orders received a combined total of over $1.6 million dollars in financial assistance made possible by the national appeal.

The Retirement Fund for Religious Collection was initiated in 1988 by the Catholic Bishops of the United States to address the significant lack of retirement funding among Catholic religious communities in the United States. Proceeds are distributed to eligible communities to help underwrite retirement and health-care expenses. Nearly 95 percent of every donation directly supports senior religious and their communities.

# # #


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communication
215-587-3747

Cathedral Basilica Of Saints Peter And Paul 2013-2014 Concert Series Experience The Best In Sacred And Classical Music In A Cathedral Setting

December 5, 2013

CATHEDRAL BASILICA OF SAINTS PETER AND PAUL
2013-2014 CONCERT SERIES

Experience the best in Sacred and Classical Music in a Cathedral Setting


Continuing in its 3rd season, Concerts at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul is proud to present some of the finest music groups in Philadelphia and from around the world in a seven concert series at the historic Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul.

The Cathedral will feature for the first time, London vocal group, Tallis Scholars featuring music such as "Missa Gaudeamus" by Tomas Luis de Victoria and Anton Bruckner's "Ave Maria" as well as works by Philippe Verdelot and Francisco Guerrero. They are one of the most renowned groups performing sacred Renaissance music throughout the world.

Tallis Scholars of London
Tuesday, December 10, 2013
7:30 p.m.
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103

Tickets are on sale now and can be purchased by visiting cathedralphilaconcerts.org.

Other Upcoming Concerts:
The Philadelphia Singers
Theme: Christmas on Logan Square
Sunday, December 15, 2013 at 3:00 p.m.

Sequentia of London
Theme: Mystical Voices of Medieval Germany in Honor of the Sainthood of Hildegard von Bingen
Wednesday, January 29, 2014 at 7:30 p.m.

Vox Ama Deus
Theme: Renaissance Candlemas Concert
Friday, February 7, 2014 at 8:00 p.m.

American Boy Choir
Sunday, March 30, 2014 at 3:00 p.m.

The Philadelphia Singers
Theme: Mozart Vespers and Schubert Mass
Sunday, May 18, 2014 at 3:00 p.m.

# # #


Editor's Note: For more information please contact Dr. John Romeri, Director, Office for Liturgical Music, at (215) 587-3696 or email concerts@adphila.org.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

diocese Of Philadelphia Publishes Audited Financial Statements For Fiscal Years Ended June 30, 2013 And June 30, 2012 Archdiocese Notes "as Reported" Surplus Of $3.9 Million For Fiscal Year 2013 Compared To "as Reported" Deficit Of $39.2 Million In Fiscal Year 2012. Core Operational Deficit Shrinks To $4.9 Million For Fiscal Year 2013 As Compared To $17.6 Million Core Operational Deficit In Fiscal Year 2012. Several Significant Balance Sheet Liabilities Remain.

December 5, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA PUBLISHES AUDITED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS FOR FISCAL YEARS ENDED JUNE 30, 2013 AND JUNE 30, 2012
Archdiocese notes "as reported" surplus of $3.9 million for fiscal year 2013 compared to "as reported" deficit of $39.2 million in fiscal year 2012.
Core operational deficit shrinks to $4.9 million for fiscal year 2013 as compared to
$17.6 million core operational deficit in fiscal year 2012.
Several significant balance sheet liabilities remain.


Contextual Background

In July 2013, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia published audited financial statements for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012. Those financial statements disclosed an overall $39.2 million operating deficit for that period inclusive of non-recurring credits and charges. When those non-recurring items were excluded, the result was a core operational deficit of $17.6 million. Additionally, several very significant and ongoing balance sheet liabilities that measure in the hundreds of millions of dollars were detailed.

These financial statements were for the entity designated as the "Office for Financial Services (OFS)," which is the official title for the majority of administrative offices and ministries located at the Archdiocesan Pastoral Center. OFS provides administrative and programmatic support to the parishes, schools and other related ecclesiastical entities of the Archdiocese. For financial reporting purposes, it is considered a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Archdiocese.

Action Steps Taken by the Archdiocese to Improve Liquidity, Reduce the Deficit and Address Balance Sheet Liabilities

Beginning in the summer of 2012 a series of steps were taken to begin to remedy Archdiocesan fiscal challenges. The Archbishop's residence along with a property in Ventnor, New Jersey, were both sold to provide necessary immediate cash flow. Many other actions followed including a reduction of 25% of the workforce at the Archdiocesan Pastoral Center in order to stem the operating deficit.

Additionally, an evaluation of various Archdiocesan real estate assets and operating entities was undertaken. This evaluation focused on assets that could potentially be used to remedy the unfunded balance sheet obligations. In August of this year, it was announced that the Archdiocese would market its six nursing homes and one assisted living facility for potential sale in addition to pursuing an outsourced management agreement and lease for its 13 cemeteries. Such an agreement regarding the cemeteries was reached and made public in late September. In November, it was announced that the Lay Employees Retirement Plan (LERP) would be frozen June 30, 2014 and that a new, defined contribution plan would be implemented for eligible employees at that time to assist them in retirement.

None of those measures were taken lightly, but all were essential. In order for the Catholic Church to maintain a viable presence in the Philadelphia region and provide for all those in need through its various ministries, it must re-establish a firm financial foundation.


Comparative Operating Results: Fiscal Year 2013 Versus Fiscal Year 2012

Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap, said "Since my arrival in Philadelphia, we've worked hard to be transparent about the financial health of our local Church. We'll continue to do so. The Church is a steward. Her resources ultimately belong to her people. It's the duty of the Archdiocese to ensure that all of our ministries are operated in a fiscally responsible way."

He continued, "The Church is about mission, not material resources; but mission depends on good financial health. As our financial statements show, we're making progress. We still have a long way to go, but we'll get there together."


The abbreviated analysis presented below compares the "Change in Net Assets Before Other Items" for fiscal years 2013 and 2012. The "as reported" surplus of $3.9 million in fiscal year 2013 compares to an "as reported" deficit of $39.2 million in fiscal year 2012. The final portion of the analysis provides a comparison of each fiscal year after adjusting for the impact of items that are non-recurring in nature. All figures are in millions of dollars. Endnotes are provided to explain selected line items.

  Fiscal Year 2013 Fiscal Year 2012
Change in Net Assets Before Other Items $3.9 ($39.2)
     
Non-Recurring Credits    
Net Gain on Sale of Real Estate Asset: (10.3) (15.8)
Gain on Ventnor Sale Released from Restrictions (2.7) -
Contribution from Cemeteries Office (2.0) (2.0)
Fidelity Insurance Recovery (0.7) -
Investment Gains (0.5) -
     
Non-Recurring Charges    
Increase in Self-Insurance Reserve - 13.0
Interest Rate Swap Loss - 8.9
Investment Losses - 1.8
Increase in Reserve for Loans 1.9 -
One Time Pledges/Subsidies 2.9 -
Legal and Professional Fees 1.1 11.9

   
Recurring Deficit Including Depreciation Expense ($6.4) ($21.4)
Depreciation Expense 1.5 3.8
Recurring Deficit Excluding Depreciation Expense $ (4.9) $ (17.6)
     

The recurring core operational deficit of $4.9 million for fiscal year 2013 compares favorably to the $17.6 million experienced in fiscal year 2012. It is expected that the core operating deficit for fiscal year 2014 will remain below $5 million. It is the goal of the Archdiocese to eventually eliminate the core operational deficit.

Status of Significant Balance Sheet Liabilities as of June 30, 2013

As previously disclosed in the financial statements for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012, the Archdiocese faces several, significant underfunded balance sheet liabilities. Those obligations included the following: The Trust and Loan Fund, The Insurance Fund, The Lay Employees' Retirement Plan and the Priests' Pension Plan. Current information on the status of each of these items is provided below.

Trust and Loan Fund

Included in the financial statements for OFS are all assets and liabilities of the Archdiocesan Trust and Loan Fund. The Trust and Loan Fund is a cooperative deposit and loan program established for the benefit of parishes and to assure continuation of the ecclesial goals of the Archdiocese and the parishes. If a parish deposits funds in the Trust and Loan, it receives a competitive interest rate. In turn, these funds are loaned by the Fund to other parishes for construction and other projects. As of May 31, 2012, the Archdiocese executed a promissory note to the Trust and Loan Fund in the amount of $78.9 million, which represented the excess of deposits over assets at May 31, 2012. As of June 30, 2012, deposits in the Trust and Loan Fund exceeded fund assets - excluding the impact of the promissory note - by $82.0 million.

Subsequent to June 30, 2012 the promissory note has been amended to increase the principal amount to $82.0 million. The promissory note is collateralized by specific pledged real estate assets which are documented in the note. As pledged properties are sold or monetized, net proceeds from these Trust and Loan collateral transactions will be deposited into the Trust and Loan Fund, in accordance with the provisions of the promissory note. In the event a transaction generates in excess of $20 million in net proceeds, the Archdiocese has discretion regarding alternative uses for the excess so long as remaining pledged assets are at least equal to the then outstanding principal amount owed.

As of June 30, 2013 the unfunded obligation in the Trust and Loan Fund was improved slightly over fiscal year 2012's $82 million as noted below. All figures are in millions of dollars.

Deposits $ 172.6 *
T&L Fund Assets (excl. promissory note & related party receivable ) 92.8
Excess of Deposits Over Assets $ 79.8


* includes approximately $300K in Trust and Loan Fund Liabilities.


Insurance Fund

The insurance fund is used to account for the risk management program of the Archdiocese. As part of the risk insurance program, levels of self-insurance risk are retained. As of June 30, 2013 insurance related liabilities exceeded dedicated insurance assets as illustrated below. All figures are in millions of dollars.

Insurance Related Liabilities: $47.6
Insurance Related Assets (excluding pre-paid expenses): 17.2
Excess of Liabilities Over Assets: $30.4

When compared to the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012, this number has remained unchanged.

Lay Employees' Retirement Plan

The Lay Employees' Retirement Plan (LERP) is considered a multi-employer plan for financial reporting purposes. As such, the assets and actuarially determined liabilities for these plans are not included in the OFS financial statements.

While not a direct liability of OFS, the amount by which the plan liability exceeds plan assets is a liability of the Archdiocese. As of June 30, 2013, the liabilities of the LERP exceeded plan assets by $142 million. For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012, the liabilities of the LERP exceeded plan assets by $152 million.

Earlier this fall, the Archdiocese announced that it would freeze the LERP effective June 30, 2014 and implement a new, defined contribution plan for eligible employees effective July 1, 2014. While the funding level is sufficient to meet the current and medium-term benefit payments, action was taken to ensure that the Plan can meet its long-term obligations to future retirees. No current or former employee experienced a loss or reduction of vested benefit as a result of this action. More information regarding that announcement can be found at http://archphila.org/press%20releases/pr002266.php.

Priests' Pension Plan

The Priests' Pension Plan is also considered a multi-employer plan for financial reporting purposes. As such, the assets and actuarially determined liabilities for these plans are not included in the OFS financial statements.

While not a direct liability of OFS, the amount by which the plan liability exceeds plan assets is a liability of the Archdiocese. As of June 30, 2013, it is estimated that the Priests' Pension Plan liabilities exceeded plan assets by approximately $92 million. For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012, the liabilities of the Priests' Pension Plan exceeded assets by approximately $90 million.


Looking Forward

The core operating deficit for fiscal year 2013 of $4.9 million was greatly improved relative to fiscal year 2012's deficit of $17.6 million. Fiscal year 2014 is expected to show further improvement. The Archdiocese is committed to eliminating the core operating deficit completely in the near future.

The Archdiocese remains focused on the balance sheet issues noted above. As previously announced, the Lay Employees' Retirement Plan will be frozen effective June 30, 2014 and a new, defined contribution plan will be established effective July 1, 2014 to assist employees in retirement. The Archdiocese will continue to make contributions to the plan after the freeze date. It is projected that the plan will be fully funded in 20-30 years.

It is hoped that closing on the previously announced transaction regarding Archdiocesan cemeteries will occur sometime in early 2014. The Archdiocese plans to use $30 million from the approximately $53 million in proceeds expected at that time for the Trust and Loan Fund shortfall. The remainder will be split equally between the Insurance Fund and the Priests' Pension Fund.

One additional update concerns the Archdiocesan property designated as the North Parking Lot of the Archdiocesan Pastoral Center. It had been previously disclosed that this parcel, which includes the Holy Family Center office building and extends the length of Vine Street from 17th Street to 18th Street, was being marketed for sale. Since the Archdiocese was not able to conclude a satisfactory transaction, it has been decided to take this property off of the market for the time being.

At the present time no further information on other potential transactions, including the nursing homes, is available. In keeping with past practice, announcements will be made publicly as transactions are completed.

Additional Financial Statements for the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2013

The audited financial statements for OFS do not include financial results for the Office for Catholic Education, Catholic Healthcare Services, Catholic Social Services, Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary, Catholic Charities Appeal or the Heritage of Faith-Vision of Hope Capital Campaign as all are separate entities. Audited financial statements for these entities will be published in the coming weeks.

Additionally, none of the reports released by the Archdiocese will include financial statements for individual parishes. All parishes are independent and autonomous entities.

# # #


Editor's Note:
Complete copies of the audited financial statements for the Office for Financial Services for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2013 and June 30, 2012 can be found at www.CatholicPhilly.com.

Endnotes


i In FY 2013 the amount represents the gain on the sale of the Archbishop's residence; in FY 2012 the amount includes gains on the sales of the Northeast Catholic and Cardinal Dougherty High School properties.

ii The gain on the sale of the property known as "Villa St. Joseph by the Sea" in Ventnor, New Jersey was approximately $4.2 million. This amount was accounted for as a "Temporarily Restricted" gain and is reflected as such on the Statement of Activities and Changes in Net Assets for the year ended June 30, 2013. The proceeds from the sale are to be used for the benefit of Villa St. Joseph in Darby, Pennsylvania, a residence for retired Archdiocesan priests. Approximately $2.7 million of the gain was used for that purpose in FY 2013.

iii The $2.0 million annual contribution from the Cemeteries Office will cease after FY 2013.

iv The $2.9 million includes: $1.5 million of transitional support - $750K in FY 2014 and $750K in FY 2015 - committed to the Independence Mission Schools, a non-profit organization managing 14 Catholic elementary schools; $1.0 million pledged to the World Meeting of Families event to be held in September 2015; and $370K representing the outstanding commitment to the St. Martin de Porres Catholic elementary school.

v In fiscal year 2013 the $1.1 million in legal and professional fees is comprised of the following:

  (in millions)
Financial and legal costs incurred in connection with potential transactions $ .5
Fees incurred for supplemental finance office staffing .3
FY 2012 financial audit over-run costs .3
  $ 1.1


In fiscal year 2012 the $11.9 million in legal and professional fees is comprised of the following:

  (in millions)
Investigation of actions by former CFO $ .5
Investigations related to Priests on Administrative Leave 4.7

Fees associated with Independent Legal and Financial Assistance/Review;
External Debt Retirement; and Criminal Trial

6.7
  $11.9


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Saint Charles Borromeo Opens Its Doors For 26th Annual Christmas Concert

December 5, 2013

SAINT CHARLES BORROMEO OPENS ITS DOORS
FOR 26TH ANNUAL CHRISTMAS CONCERT


Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary invites everyone to an evening of religious music and prayer during this year's Advent season at the 26th annual Christmas Concert. This year's theme is "Holy Family: Lessons from Nazareth."

Sunday, December 8, 2013
7:00 p.m.
The Chapel of Saint Martin of Tours
Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary
100 East Wynnewood Road
Wynnewood, PA 19096 (Montgomery County)


More than fifty international Christmas crèches will be on display before the concert in the Ryan Memorial Library. The evening is free and open to the public. A free-will offering will be collected at intermission to benefit the Holy Family Home in Philadelphia, which is administered by the Little Sisters of the Poor.

# # #


Editor's Note: For more information on the Christmas Concert, please call 610-667-3394 or visit http://www.scs.edu/event/christmas-concert#sthash.LFmmO6Js.dpuf/


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: A Listening Heart And 'the Joy Of The Gospel'

December 6, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
A LISTENING HEART AND 'THE JOY OF THE GOSPEL'


"Two percent of the people think; three percent think they think; and ninety-five percent would rather die than think."

Those words of George Bernard Shaw were meant as dry humor. But sometimes they have the uncomfortable ring of truth. The public's ongoing fascination with nearly everything Pope Francis says and does is well earned and hugely refreshing. This Holy Father is a man not just of intelligence, but also of simplicity, energy, openness and hope. Nothing is more compelling than a person who radiates joy. And given the character of Francis the man, it's no surprise that the first major text written entirely on his own as bishop of Rome is entitled Evangelii Gaudium - "The Joy of the Gospel."

But the point of writing the text, of course, was to have Catholics actually read it, all of it as a whole -- not read "about" it, or read it selectively, or read it through the lens of an agenda. The content of Catholic belief can't be reduced to sound bites. When interpreters do that, they impose impossible expectations and false perceptions on the public. The result is confusion and resentment, which are a very long way from the "joy of the Gospel."

Nothing has changed in the essentials of Catholic belief about the priority of the sanctity of life issues; about the nature of human sexuality; about the urgency of defending marriage and the family; or about the need to carry the struggle for charity and justice into the public square. It's worth noting these lines from Evangelii Gaudium:

On the unborn, in part quoting John Paul II:

Among the vulnerable for whom the Church wishes to care with particular love and concern are unborn children, the most defenseless and innocent among us. Nowadays efforts are made to deny them their human dignity and to do with them whatever one pleases, taking their lives and passing laws preventing anyone from standing in the way of this. Frequently, as a way of ridiculing the Church's effort to defend their lives, attempts are made to present her position as ideological, obscurantist and conservative. Yet this defense of unborn life is closely linked to the defense of each and every other human right. It involves the conviction that a human being is always sacred and inviolable, in any situation and at every stage of development. Human beings are ends in themselves and never a means of resolving other problems. Once this conviction disappears, so do solid and lasting foundations for the defense of human rights, which would always be subject to the passing whims of the powers that be. Reason alone is sufficient to recognize the inviolable value of each single human life, but if we also look at the issue from the standpoint of faith, "every violation of the personal dignity of the human being cries out in vengeance to God and is an offence against the creator of the individual" (213).

On marriage and the family:

The family is experiencing a profound cultural crisis, as are all communities and social bonds. In the case of the family, the weakening of these bonds is particularly serious because the family is the fundamental cell of society, where we learn to live with others despite our differences and to belong to one another; it is also the place where parents pass on the faith to their children. Marriage now tends to be viewed as a form of mere emotional satisfaction that can be constructed in any way or modified at will. But the indispensable contribution of marriage to society transcends the feelings and momentary needs of the couple. As the French bishops have taught, it is not born "of loving sentiment, ephemeral by definition, but from the depth of the obligation assumed by the spouses who accept to enter a total communion of life" (66).

On politics, in part quoting Benedict XVI:

If indeed "the just ordering of society and of the state is a central responsibility of politics," the Church "cannot and must not remain on the sidelines in the fight for justice." All Christians, their pastors included, are called to show concern for the building of a better world (183).

These good passages though capture only a part of the power of Evangelii Gaudium. What makes this text so memorable is the Holy Father's extraordinary zeal for the poor. Love for the poor is hardly a new message from the Successors of Peter, but Francis brings a humility and passionate eloquence to the task that moves the heart as well as the mind.

Some years ago I asked an audience where I was speaking to repeat out loud, three times, these words: If we ignore the poor, we will go to hell. It was a sobering moment for everyone in the room. More importantly though, the opposite is also true: The more we love the poor, the more fully human we become; the more generously we encounter the needy and serve those who suffer, the more we begin to experience the joy of heaven. Evangelii Gaudium captures this freedom, this joy, of meeting God in the daily struggles of the poor with remarkable power.

Critics who claim that Francis has attacked wealthy persons, or condemned capitalism, or dismissed the dignity of business as a vocation simply haven't read "The Joy of the Gospel" with a listening heart. The text is alive with the spirit of mercy. It's a profound invitation to each of us to turn away from the personal acquisitiveness and consumer gluttony that divide people from each other, that break down our families and communities, and that deaden us to the urgent needs of others.

As we enter more deeply into Advent, as we're buffeted by the commercialism that now marks the holidays, it's worth reflecting on these words of Francis:

One cause of [the inhumanity in modern culture] is found in our relationship with money, since we calmly accept its dominion over ourselves and our societies. The current financial crisis can make us overlook the fact that it originated in a profound human crisis: the denial of the primacy of the human person! We have created new idols. The worship of the ancient golden calf (cf. Ex 32:1-35) has returned in a new and ruthless guise in the idolatry of money and the dictatorship of an impersonal economy lacking a truly human purpose. The worldwide crisis affecting finance and the economy lays bare their imbalances and, above all, their lack of real concern for human beings; man is reduced to one of his needs alone: consumption (55).

The joy we seek at Christmas and throughout the year can't be had from things. It comes from the experience of love we share with God and other people. "The Joy of the Gospel" distills and expresses that simple truth with uncommon beauty. Read it. Pray over it. Then make it a part of your life.

###


Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Statement Of Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.f.m. Cap. Regarding Pope Francis' Selection As Person Of The Year

December 11, 2013

Statement of Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.
Regarding Pope Francis' Selection as Person of the Year


"It is with joy that I congratulate Pope Francis on being named TIME's Person of the Year for 2013.

Our Holy Father has a remarkable way of uniting people of all cultures. He is a man deeply engaged in contemporary issues with an ability to speak to the modern heart. Pope Francis is a pastor God sends not just to the Church but to every person of good will who honestly yearns for justice, peace and human dignity in our time.

May God grant him courage and joy as he continues to spread the Good News throughout the world."

# # #


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: "rejoice In The Lord Always"

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
"REJOICE IN THE LORD ALWAYS"


For anyone who seeks out the real meaning of the holidays, the last few days before Christmas are the most powerful period of Advent and an intensely beautiful time of year. This weekend we celebrate Gaudete Sunday, with its spirit of joy and its rose liturgical vestments as an alternative to the season's violet. The day takes its name from the opening words of the Introit at the beginning of Mass: Gaudete in Domino semper, or "Rejoice in the Lord always" (Phil 4:4,5). And it's followed just a few days later by the Octave before Christmas, Dec. 17-23, the time of the "O Antiphons."

In Christian worship, an antiphon is a special prayer recited or chanted before a psalm or canticle. The "O Antiphons" refer to the seven antiphons recited before the Magnificat during Vespers in the Liturgy of the Hours. They entered the Church's liturgy as early as the fifth century. By the eighth century they were a regular part of Christian liturgical life in Rome. Thus, they belong to a very ancient Advent tradition of glorifying God. Each O Antiphon names a title for God's Anointed One: O Wisdom; O Lord; O Root of Jesse; O Key of David; O Rising Sun; O King of the Nations; O Emmanuel (meaning, "God with us").

Each antiphon is linked by Scripture to the prophecy in Isaiah of the coming of the Messiah.

One of the biggest sadnesses of modern life is this: We've mistaken comfort for happiness, and as a result, the pursuit of satisfaction has taken away our joy. We live in a culture increasingly based on the strange idea that whatever we want, we deserve-and we should have it, right now; a culture that constantly teases our appetites, fabricates new "needs" and then urges us to want more. This is a recipe for discontent. As C.S. Lewis said more than 50 years ago, it's little wonder that many people, including many Christians, become so fed up with the "holiday" season's frenzy that they endure it rather than enjoy it, and can't wait for it to be over.

In contrast, the more deeply we live Advent, and the more prayerfully and patiently we wait for the coming of Jesus Christ in Bethlehem, then the more fully we experience the joy of Christmas. For Catholics throughout the centuries, Christmas Eve begins the Christmas season, which continues through the Epiphany to the Baptism of the Lord. As the popular saying rightly goes, Jesus is the reason for the season. Taking Christ out of "the holidays" removes any real joy - the winter solstice is an interesting natural fact, but the shortest day of the year is a pretty thin reason to celebrate - and it makes "peace on earth" a well-meaning but implausible platitude. There is no peace on earth; nor can there ever be without the cross of Jesus Christ.

During these final Advent days of Gaudete Sunday and the O Antiphons, the Church gives us a last opportunity to settle our spirits, quiet our worries and refocus our hearts on the One who should anchor our lives. Human history changed fundamentally and forever in Bethlehem. The child we wait for is the hope of all men and women, in every culture, in every age. The joy of Christmas has very little to do with the gifts we give or get. What begins at Bethlehem and leads to Golgotha and beyond is a revolution - the most profound in history and the only real one; a revolution sparked by God's intervention and love.

May God grant all of us the grace to experience the coming of God's son for what it truly is; and may he bless every one of us and our families as we wait for the miracle of Bethlehem.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Announces Additional Resolutions Of Cases Of Priests On Administrative Leave Archbishop Chaput Makes Final Decisions In Seven More Cases Of Priests Placed On Administrative Leave Following The February 2011 Grand Jury Report

December 15, 2013

THE ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA ANNOUNCES
ADDITIONAL RESOLUTIONS OF CASES OF
PRIESTS ON ADMINISTRATIVE LEAVE

Archbishop Chaput makes final decisions in seven more cases of priests placed on administrative
leave following the February 2011 Grand Jury Report


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced today that Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has made final decisions in seven more cases of priests placed on administrative leave following the February 2011 Grand Jury Report. Priests on administrative leave are not permitted to exercise their public ministry, administer any of the Sacraments, wear clerical attire, or present themselves publicly as priests.

Archbishop Chaput has decided that two of the priests are suitable for ministry. He has also decided that one of the priests is unsuitable for ministry due to a substantiated allegation of sexual abuse of a minor and that four of the priests are unsuitable for ministry due to substantiated violations of The Standards of Ministerial Behaviors and Boundaries. Additional information regarding these decisions is available in the attached background documents and at http://archphila.org/HHHIC/hhhic.php.

Those priests found unsuitable for ministry will have no public ministry in the Archdiocese. They do have the right to appeal the decision to the Holy See. For any priest found to have a substantiated allegation of sexual abuse of a minor, if they do not appeal, or if their appeal is unsuccessful, they could be laicized (removed from the clerical state) or live a life of prayer and penance.

Announcements were made at the parishes where these priests last served when they were placed on administrative leave in March of 2011. Follow up announcements were made at those parishes this weekend regarding the final decisions in their cases. Counselors were made available for parishioners.

All cases were first reported to the appropriate local district attorney's office so that law enforcement could investigate the matter and review it for possible criminal charges. Upon declination of criminal charges by the district attorney, the Archdiocesan Office of Investigations began a canonical investigation in each case. The results of this process were submitted to the Archdiocesan Professional Responsibility Review Board (APRRB). The APRRB is comprised of twelve men and women, both Catholic and non-Catholic, with extensive professional backgrounds in the investigation and treatment of child sexual abuse. It functions as a confidential advisory committee to the Archbishop, which assesses allegations of sexual abuse as well as allegations of violations of The Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries. This body provided a recommendation as to suitability for ministry to the Archbishop, who made the final decisions.

On May 4, 2012; July 6, 2012; October 15, 2012 and April 7, 2013 Archbishop Chaput announced resolutions in 18 of the cases of priests on administrative leave. Of the 18, eight priests were found suitable for ministry and nine priests were found unsuitable for ministry. In one additional case, the priest died before a full investigation could be conducted so it was not possible to reach a conclusion. All of those cases followed the same process of review and by the district attorney, an internal, canonical investigation, review by the APRRB and a final decision by the Archbishop. More information regarding those announcements is available at http://archphila.org/HHHIC/hhhic.php.

With the decision announced today, the Archdiocese will continue the initiative entitled Honesty, Healing and Hope in Christ: Confronting Sexual Violence in Our Archdiocese, which was introduced in May 2012. Once a case is resolved the initiative begins at the parish level and consists of four phases over six months. Its purpose is to address the wide variety of reactions, thoughts and feelings that will be experienced as a result of this announcement and in the days and weeks moving forward. It identifies three primary stakeholders: the victims of the allegation or violation of The Standards of Ministerial Behaviors and Boundaries, the parishioners, who include school and Parish Religious Education Program (PREP) families, and the priests on administrative leave. Through the implementation of this initiative, the Archdiocese continues a journey of honesty, healing and hope toward the restoration of trust.

The remaining administrative leave case that followed the Grand Jury Report is not being announced today as the investigative process is not yet complete. Consistent with Archdiocesan policy, it was reported to the appropriate district attorney. In November of 2013, law enforcement declined to press charges. The internal Archdiocesan investigation is currently in progress. At its conclusion, the results of the investigation will be provided to the Archdiocesan Professional Responsibility Review Board will review the findings and provide a recommendation to Archbishop Chaput, who will make a final determination, which will be announced publicly.

To Make a Report
If you would like to report a violation of The Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries, contact the Archdiocesan Office for Investigations at 1-888-930-9010.

If you would like to report an allegation of sexual abuse, contact your local law enforcement agency and/or the Office for Investigations at 1-888-930-9010.

We recognize that this public notice may be painful to victims of sexual violence. If you need support or assistance, victim services are available to you through the Victim Assistance Office of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia at 1-888-800-8780 or philavac@archphila.org.

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Editor's Note:

Numerical Breakdown of Resolutions to Cases of Priests on Administrative Leave
Cases of administrative leave following the Grand Jury Report: 26
Resolutions announced on May 4, 2012: 8 (one priest died prior to a full investigation) total of 9
Resolutions announced on July 6, 2012: 6
Resolution announced on October 15, 2012: 1
Resolutions Announced on April 7, 2013: 2
Priests on administrative leave who were arrested: 1
Resolutions announced today: 7*
Cases remaining: 1

*One of the resolutions announced today involves Father Michael Chapman. He was found suitable for ministry in May 2012 based on an unsubstantiated allegation that he violated The Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries. Subsequent to that announcement, a new allegation was received by the Archdiocese that he had sexually abused a minor. This information was provided to law enforcement and Father Chapman was placed back on administrative leave. At no time was he ever returned to active ministry.

For additional background information please visit http://archphila.org/HHHIC/hhhic.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Announcement Regarding Reverend John P. Paul

December 15, 2013

ANNOUNCEMENT REGARDING REVEREND JOHN P. PAUL


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has placed Reverend John P. Paul on administrative leave following allegations that he sexually abused minors over 30 years ago. While on administrative leave he is not permitted to exercise public ministry, administer any of the Sacraments, wear clerical attire or present himself publicly as a priest pending the outcome of the investigation.

This action is not connected to the resolutions of cases of priests placed on administrative leave following the February 2011 Grand Jury Report announced earlier today.

Background Information
Late last year and earlier this year, the Archdiocese received allegations that Father Paul had sexually abused minors over 40 years ago during his time as a seminarian.

Consistent with the Archdiocesan Policy for the Protection of Children and Young People promulgated in October 2012, these allegations were reported to law enforcement, which, after a lengthy investigation, declined to press charges.

The allegations were also reviewed by the Archdiocesan Office of Investigations, the Office for Child and Youth Protection and the Office of the Vicar for Clergy. Those offices made a joint recommendation, approved by the Archdiocesan Professional Responsibility Review Board, and presented to the Archbishop, who decided to restrict Father Paul's ministry so that he would have no unsupervised contact with minors pending the outcome of the internal Archdiocesan investigation that was in progress. Notification of his restrictions was made to administrators at the parish and the parish school. A monitoring and support plan was implemented and followed throughout that time.

On November 6, 2013, Father Paul resigned as pastor of Our Lady of Calvary Parish, Philaldelphia, where he had been serving since 2000. He came to that decision of his own accord during the course of the Archdiocesan investigation regarding this alleged abuse.

Information Regarding Today's Announcement
Following Father Paul's resignation he moved to a private residence. He was not assigned to any parish and was not in active ministry. He continued to adhere to a monitoring and support plan. Subsequently, the Archdiocese received multiple, new allegations that Father Paul had sexually abused minors over 30 years ago. These allegations were reported to the appropriate district attorney's office. Father Paul will remain on administrative leave pending any possible action by law enforcement and a full internal investigation. In keeping with standing Archdiocesan policy, that internal investigation will not proceed until after law enforcement has concluded its process.

An announcement regarding Father Paul was made at Our Lady of Calvary Parish in Philadelphia last month to explain the circumstances surrounding his resignation. An additional announcement regarding his administrative leave was made at the parish this weekend.

Biographical Information
Father Paul is 67 years old. He was ordained in 1972. He served at the following parishes and schools: Saint Alphonsus, Maple Glen (1972-1974); Faculty, Archbishop Kennedy High School (1974-1975); Saint Isaac Jogues, Wayne (1974-1975); Faculty, Bishop McDevitt High School, Wyncote (1975-1986); Faculty, Saint James Catholic High School for Boys, Chester (1986-1990); Saint Robert, Chester (1986-1990); Faculty, Archbishop Kennedy High School (1990-1993); Saint Philip Neri, Lafayette Hill (1990-1995); Faculty, Kennedy-Kenrick High School, Norristown (1993-1997); Faculty, Archbishop Wood High School, Warminster (1997-2000); Saint Andrew, Newton (1997-2000); Our Lady of Calvary, Philadelphia (2000-2013); placed on administrative leave (2013).

To Make a Report
To report an allegation of sexual abuse, contact your local law enforcement agency and the Office for Investigations at 1-888-930-9010.

To report a violation of The Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries, contact the Archdiocesan Office for Investigations at 1-888-930-9010.

We recognize that this public notice may be painful to victims of sexual violence. If you need support or assistance, victim services and referrals are available to you through the Victim Assistance Office of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia at 1-888-800-8780 or philavac@archphila.org.

###


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

The Cathedral Basilica Of Saints Peter And Paul: Christmas Eve And Christmas Day Mass Schedule

December 16, 2013

THE CATHEDRAL BASILICA OF SAINTS PETER AND PAUL:
CHRISTMAS EVE AND CHRISTMAS DAY MASS SCHEDULE


Schedule of Christmas Eve and Christmas Day Masses


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will be the celebrant and homilist at the Midnight and Noon Masses on Christmas Day. Christmas Eve and Christmas Day Masses at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul are a special Holy Day of observance for Catholics in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. All are welcome to celebrate the Nativity of Our Lord at the mother church of the Archdiocese.

Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Tuesday, December 24, 2013:


- Beginning at 11:00 p.m. - Cathedral Basilica Choir and Cathedral Strings and Brass will provide the Choral Prelude to the Midnight Mass.
- 12:00 a.m. - Solemn Midnight Mass celebrated with music provided by the Cathedral Basilica Choir and Cathedral Strings and Brass.

Additional Christmas Eve Masses will be celebrated in the Cathedral Basilica at 5:00 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Music for both Masses will be provided by the Cathedral Schola and Cathedral Strings and Brass.

Wednesday, December 25, 2013:

- 12:00 p.m. - Solemn Mass with music provided by the Cathedral Basilica Choir and the Cathedral Strings and Brass.

Additional Christmas Day Masses will be celebrated in the Cathedral Basilica at 8:00 a.m. and 10:00 a.m. Music at the 10:00 a.m. Mass will be provided by the Cathedral Schola and Cathedral Strings and Brass.

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Editor's Note:There will not be a mult-box feed for any of the Christmas Eve or Christmas Day Masses. Media planning to cover any Mass at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul are asked to call the Cathedral rectory at 215-561-1313.


Contact
Annie Korp
Communications Assistant
215-587-3747

Annual Archbishop's Christmas Benefit For Children Marks Its 57th Year

December 19, 2013

ANNUAL ARCHBISHOP'S CHRISTMAS BENEFIT
FOR CHILDREN MARKS ITS 57TH YEAR


The 57th Annual Archbishop's Christmas Benefit for Children will host 400 young people who receive services from over a dozen programs administered by Catholic Social Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. They represent approximately 16,000 children across the Delaware Valley who benefited from residential and community-based programs offered by Catholic Social Services this year, including children with disabilities, at-risk children, and dependent or court-adjudicated youth.

The theme for this year's Archbishop's Christmas Benefit for Children is "Charlie Brown Christmas." The Catholic Community Choir will sing songs from A Charlie Brown Christmas and act out portions of the book. Archdiocesan high school students will participate in this year's event by serving as Santa's elves and distributing presents.

Thursday, December 19, 2013
2:00 p.m.
Sheraton Philadelphia Center City Hotel
17th Street between Race and Vine Streets
Philadelphia, PA 19103


1:00 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. Saint Charles Borromeo Parish Choir sings carols in the lobby and the All Catholic Jazz Band performs as children enter ballroom
2:00 p.m. Spirit Dancers from DePaul School enter ballroom along with Kamal Bostic-Smith, Assistant Director at St. Martin de Porres OST Middle School Program, who will be singing
2:15 p.m. Catholic Community Choir performs
3:00 p.m. Santa arrives to greet the children
3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m. Santa and his elves distribute gifts

More than just a one-time party for a few hundred children, the Archbishop's Christmas Benefit for Children raises funds to support programs of Catholic Social Services that daily serve children throughout the year. Catholic Social Services assists more than 162,000 children, adults and families of all faiths throughout the five-county area of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

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Editor's Note: For more information or to make a donation in support of the Archbishop's Christmas Benefit for Children, please visit www.archbishopschristmasbenefit.org/


Contact
Stephanie Brophy
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: The Birthday Of Life And An Uprising Against Sorrow

December 20, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
THE BIRTHDAY OF LIFE AND AN UPRISING AGAINST SORROW


Two of the recurring themes for "the holidays" each December are joy and peace. But beset by so much frantic marketing, and with so many seasonal distractions and pressures, many Americans can't remember why they should feel happy. Warm feelings need a better reason than the winter solstice.

For the believer who stops and prays, nothing can obscure the real meaning of Christmas. Nothing can diminish the clean, bright beauty of Christmas Mass, or the glory of the carols we hold dear. Christmas is the birthday of life. This day is the beginning of hope. Jesus Christ is Lord - the only name under heaven by which anyone can be saved (Acts 4:12); there is no other - and his birth is our rebirth.

The joy in Christmas is the fact that God's love becomes flesh. God enters a sinful world in order to redeem it. The peace in Christmas is the reconciliation God begins in Bethlehem between himself and humanity. The stable leads to the cross. The cross leads to a tomb. And the tomb leads to resurrection and life. Easter begins in Christmas, and that's the reason we sing. This is a good time of year to remember that what we celebrate as Christians is much more than a pious story about a baby, or a parable about new life. Christmas is real. Christmas is a revolution. Christmas begins an uprising against the world, against sin, against death, against despair, against loneliness, led by the loving God who created us.

In Genesis, God said, "Let there be light," and creation began. This Christmas, and every Christmas, God speaks again -- through his Son, his Word made flesh - saying "Let there be a light," and in the Christmas sky, rises a light unto the gentiles that renews the world.

The source of our joy is the hope Christmas Day kindles in our hearts. And the reason for our hope is the coming of a Savior in the birth of Jesus Christ.

May his coming fill each of us with happiness - today, every day of the Christmas season and throughout the coming year.

# # #


Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Responds To Superior Court Ruling Regarding Sentence Of Monsignor William J. Lynn
December 26, 2013

ARCHDIOCESE RESPONDS TO SUPERIOR COURT RULING
REGARDING SENTENCE OF MONSIGNOR WILLIAM J. LYNN


When Monsignor Lynn's sentence was announced last summer, the Archdiocese reemphasized that it has changed dramatically since the events over ten years ago that were at the center of the trial and reaffirmed that dramatic steps have been taken to ensure that all young people in our care find a safe and nurturing environment. It also expressed a hope that the nature of the sentence imposed on Monsignor Lynn would be objectively reviewed. That has happened.

The decision by the Superior Court to overturn this conviction does not and will not alter the Church's commitment to assist and support the survivors of sexual abuse on their journey toward healing or our dedicated efforts to ensure that all young people in our care are safe.

Our path forward is to remain vigilant in our efforts now and in the years to come. This path includes providing resources and support to survivors, our commitment to immediately report any allegation of sexual abuse involving a minor to law enforcement, and restoring the trust of the faithful and all those who look to the Church as a beacon of God's promise and love. The reputation of the Church can only be rebuilt through transparency, honesty and a fulfillment of our responsibility to the young people in our care and the victims and survivors who need our support.

We recognize that today's news is especially difficult for survivors and their families. We profoundly regret their pain.

To Make a Report
To report an allegation of sexual abuse, contact your local law enforcement agency and the Office for Investigations at 1-888-930-9010.

To report a violation of The Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries, contact the Archdiocesan Office for Investigations at 1-888-930-9010.

We recognize that this public notice may be painful to victims of sexual violence. If you need support or assistance, victim services and referrals are available to you through the Victim Assistance Office of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia at 1-888-800-8780 or philavac@archphila.org .


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: The World Day Of Peace, 2014
December 27, 2013

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:

THE WORLD DAY OF PEACE, 2014


"All great tragedies in history arise because somewhere, somehow, man misinterprets himself, takes himself to be what he is not, or not to be what he is." - Charles Habib Malik, "The Grounds of Peace," 1953

The name of Charles Habib Malik is largely forgotten today. But in the wake of World War II, he was a voice of sanity and hope for a humanity torn apart by global suffering. Philosopher, diplomat and Harvard professor, Malik co-authored the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, served as president of the U.N. General Assembly and chaired the U.N. Commission on Human Rights. An Arab Christian born in Lebanon, he never sought to hide his faith. Quite the opposite. At the heart of all Malik's work for peace lay the Gospel. He often reminded people that:

"The Church is the original ground for all hope of peace. Though other grounds may fail us, this ground will never falter, because its Founder has already conquered the world. The family, the school, the economic process, the babblings of men, are subject to the law of decay and death, and to live they must keep rising in [Jesus Christ] who overcame death."

More than 60 years have passed since Malik wrote those words. And despite his efforts and the work of so many others, the world seems farther from peace today than ever, marred by civil war, economic inequality, ethnic hatred and religious persecution. In the Middle East, Christians have borne the brunt of violence and bigotry in a uniquely ugly way. Many have fled the region just to survive.

But, were he alive today, Malik would probably understand our world very well. Despite all our plaintive calls for justice and peace, we ensure the opposite - we guarantee conflict - by our selfishness and lack of personal engagement with the suffering of others. As Malik warned, modern life relentlessly urges us to focus on ourselves and to misinterpret the profoundly connected creatures we are as human beings. We cling to illusions of personal sovereignty, ambition and comfort when in fact we're obligated to each other as children loved by the same God.

Healing this spirit of estrangement requires a conversion of heart in each of us. It requires a turning away from ourselves and toward God and others at the personal level; and a genuine concern for the material and spiritual well-being of the people around us, starting above all with the poor. Otherwise every attempt at building peace will be grounded in sand.

Next week, in his first World Day of Peace message (January 1), Pope Francis writes that:

"Fraternity is an essential human quality, for we are relational beings. A lively awareness of our relatedness helps us to look upon and to treat each person as a true sister or brother; without fraternity it is impossible to build a just society and a solid and lasting peace. We should remember that fraternity is generally first learned in the family, thanks above all to the responsible and complementary roles of each of its members, particularly the father and the mother. The family is the wellspring of all fraternity, and as such it is the foundation and the first pathway to peace, since, by its vocation, it is meant to spread its love to the world around it."

Of course, a family needs to eat. A family needs shelter and clothing and a reasonable source of income to create a loving and stable home. Without these, the dignity of the family too easily becomes a romantic ideal disconnected from factual conditions. And this explains much of Pope Francis' recurrent theme of economic justice. Poverty attacks the family, breaks down self-respect, eats away like an acid at the bonds of friendship and sets people against each other in competing for survival. With Charles Malik, Pope Francis and the whole long tradition of Christian social teaching, we need to understand that real peace involves more than the absence of bloodshed, and the worst kind of violence isn't necessarily physical.

In these days of the Christmas season, as we ready ourselves to begin the new year, this is a good moment to examine our own lives for the material things we need and don't need. It's a good moment to commit ourselves to living more modestly and giving ourselves and our resources to others more generously. If we genuinely want peace, the road to that destination begins in our own actions.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Director of Communications
215-587-3747