Blue Ribbon Commission Announces Strategic Plan To Strengthen Catholic Education In The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia

January 3, 2012

BLUE RIBBON COMMISSION ANNOUNCES STRATEGIC PLAN TO STRENGTHEN CATHOLIC EDUCATION
IN THE ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced today that Archbishop Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has received the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Commission, which include an ambitious plan to restructure the schools that will stabilize Catholic schools across the Archdiocese and position them for future growth. The recommendations also address, among other things, Parish Religious Education Programs (PREP), governance and advocacy for government support.

"The content of the report is challenging - especially, and in a very personal way, for many of our families and students," said Archbishop Chaput. "But we can no longer avoid dealing with enrollment and financial realities that have been building in our schools for many years. The restructuring proposed in the Commission's report is a critical first step in renewing the health of our Catholic education ministry."

Appointed by Cardinal Justin Rigali in December 2010, the 16-member Blue Ribbon Commission engaged in a yearlong process to examine current programs at all levels. They looked at the educational programs offered at each school, current and historical enrollment figures, overall finances for the schools and parishes, current and projected capacity, facility improvements that would be needed and overall demographic trends in the Archdiocese. The Commission found that overall enrollment is down more than 70 percent since 1961, parish subsidies to the schools have increased by 25 percent in the last 10 years, and rising costs have caused a reduction of full-time personnel to staff programs like art, music, languages and technology at some parish elementary schools.

With deep analysis, thoughtful debate and continued prayer, the Commission has recommended restructuring the schools as part of a broader plan designed to strengthen the remaining schools and enhance Catholic education in the Philadelphia region. This restructuring plan includes partnering and regionalizing a significant number of parish elementary and high schools across the Archdiocese.

"While the restructuring of our schools was necessary to ensure their future, our plan is much broader," said John J. (Jack) Quindlen, Chair of the Blue Ribbon Commission. "This plan is designed to develop stronger schools that are better positioned to deliver the high quality education that parents want and students need in order to compete in the 21st century."


The plan includes a new governance model that will provide greater oversight and efficiency to the management of the schools. More support will go into the Parish Religious Education Programs (PREP) that serve tens of thousands of students who attend public schools but come to the parishes to receive their Sacraments and Catechetical Formation. The plan also calls for establishing a foundation, specifically to support our schools, to supplement the current foundation, parish and Archdiocesan support. This foundation will provide for greater tuition assistance and will ensure that the schools have the funds needed to innovate.

"I am grateful to the Commission for their tireless work over the last year," said Archbishop Chaput. "The charge given to them was not an easy one and we have deep appreciation for their commitment to this worthy cause. I also extend my heartfelt support and prayer to the administrators, teachers, staff and families who are affected by this news."

The Blue Ribbon Commission report, parent letters and updates from the Office of Catholic education can be viewed at www.faithinthefuture.com.



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Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Celebrates National Vocations Awareness Week

January 9, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA CELEBRATES
NATIONAL VOCATIONS AWARENESS WEEK

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia is celebrating National Vocations Awareness Week, January 8 to Saturday, January 14, 2012.

Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M., Cap. will preside over a special Eucharistic gathering with students and faculty

Monday, January 9, 2012
10:00 a.m.
Bishop Shanahan High School
220 Woodbine Road
Downingtown, PA 19335 (Chester County)



National Vocations Awareness Week is an annual celebration dedicated to promote vocations to the priesthood, diaconate, and consecrated life through prayer and education. Parishes and schools will hold special events throughout the Archdiocese of Philadelphia during the week to promote and pray for vocations to the priesthood.

On Friday, January 13, 2012, there will be an Annual Gathering of Young Men at Saint Charles Seminary from 7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. for those considering a vocation to the priesthood. The evening will include a tour of the seminary, discussion with priests and seminarians and conclude with Exposition of the Most Blessed Sacrament and Evening Prayer.

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Editor's Note: For more information on Vocations Awareness Week please contact the Vocations Office for the Diocesan Priesthood at 610-667-5778 or visit www.heedthecall.org.

Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Remembers The Life Of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr

January 10, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA REMEMBERS
THE LIFE OF DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR

Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M., Cap. will lead an Ecumenical Service in remembrance of the life of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. on

Sunday, January 15, 2012
3:00 p.m.
Our Lady of the Blessed Sacrament Parish
345 North 63rd Street
Philadelphia, PA 19139


This marks the 29th year the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will celebrate an Ecumenical Service in honor of Doctor King. The theme is "Guiding Our Feet into the Way of Peace". All are invited to attend.


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Editor's Note: For more information please contact William Bradley, Director of the Office for Black Catholics at (215) 587-3541.

Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Outlines Review Process For Schools Recommended To Close, Partner Or Regionalize

January 10, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA OUTLINES REVIEW PROCESS FOR SCHOOLS RECOMMENDED TO CLOSE, PARTNER OR REGIONALIZE

Today, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia outlined a review process for parish and school administrators who wish to request that the recommendation of a closure, partnership or regionalization be reconsidered for their school.

The Archdiocese has established two Review Committees-one for parish elementary schools and one for high schools-to facilitate these requests. Pastors, elementary school principals and high school presidents seeking an appeal have been asked to contact the Office of Catholic Education to request a meeting with the appropriate Review Committee.

These committees, which consist of members of the Blue Ribbon Commission and Archdiocesan administrators, will hold review meetings starting Thursday, January 12 and continue through early February. At these review meetings, school representatives will be presented with all of the facts used by the Blue Ribbon Commission in reaching its recommendation. Those requesting a review will also be given the opportunity to present the reasoning for their request along with supporting facts and documentation.

The Review Committees will present all information to Archbishop Chaput for his consideration. He will then make a final decision. A final listing of the schools affected will be made public by mid-February.

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Editor's Note: For a full copy of the Blue Ribbon Commission Report and up-to-date information please visit www.faithinthefuture.com.

Contact
Donna M. Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Thoughts On The Commission Report, One Week Later

January 12, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
THOUGHTS ON THE COMMISSION REPORT, ONE WEEK LATER

Over the past week, I've received hundreds of emails about the report of our Blue Ribbon Commission on Catholic Education. The report calls for the closing or merger of dozens of our archdiocesan schools. Philadelphia has a long and venerable Catholic school tradition. So it's no surprise that, while quite a few emails have expressed support, many more have been filled with confusion, anger and grief. This is natural. In fact, it would be abnormal and very troubling if people didn't vent their feelings on a matter so close to the heart of Philadelphia Catholics.

But as tempers begin to cool, people read the report more closely, and schools consider appealing the Commission's recommendations, we should keep a few basic facts in mind.

First, the Blue Ribbon Commission report is not finally about "closing schools." It's about putting Catholic education on a firm footing for the first time in decades. We tend to avoid this unpleasant work for understandable reasons: It can't be done without suffering, and nobody wants to be the cause of other good people's pain. But the work needs to be done. It can't be delayed. Commission members have served all of us well by speaking truthfully - and offering genuine hope for the future -- about enrollment and financial realities nobody wants to face.

The resource challenges we face in 2012 are much harsher than 40 or 50 years ago when many of us attended Catholic school. No family can run on nostalgia and red ink. Every parent knows this from experience. And so it is with the Church. We have a moral duty to use our resources wisely, not just in education, but in every aspect of our life as a believing community. If we haven't always done that in the past, then we need to start now. Catholic schools are worth fighting for because they do an extraordinary job of educating young people. We need to ensure that our schools are vigorously Catholic; academically excellent; and serve our people for decades to come. But we need to do it wisely and creatively, enlisting all the outside help we can. The Blue Ribbon Commission report is a vital step toward a strategic renewal of Catholic education in the archdiocese - which is why it's a step forward.

Second, I'm very aware of the burdens many families and teachers will face because of the Commission's recommendations. This was the hardest part of the Commission's deliberations, especially since every Commission member has a long track record of service to the Church and a personal love for Catholic schools. I want to assure our people that the archdiocese will make every reasonable effort to place students and teachers in new positions and to assist those teachers who will lose their employment. No one will be ignored.

Third, one of the bright spots of a difficult week has been the number of business leaders and elected officials who have approached me privately to voice their support for Catholic schools and offer their help going forward. So maybe this is a moment when we can start imagining and doing the future differently. It's useful to wonder how many of our schools might have been saved if, over the last decade, Catholics had fought for vouchers as loudly and vigorously as they now grieve about school closings. Some Catholics - too many -- seem to find it easier to criticize their own leaders than to face the fact that they're discriminated against every day of the year. They pay once for public schools; then they pay again for the Catholic schools they rightly hold in such esteem. Something's wrong with that equation. It's important for Catholics to hold the leadership of their Church accountable. No bishop or pastor should fear that. But Catholics should hold public leaders - beginning with our elected officials in Harrisburg - to an equally demanding standard. School choice may not answer every financial challenge in Catholic education; but vouchers would make a decisive difference. They'd help our schools enormously. To put it simply: Vouchers are a matter of parental rights and basic justice.

Fourth and finally, in the weeks ahead, as emotions subside, let's remember that all of us have the duty to treat each other with charity and civility in Jesus Christ. The Blue Ribbon Commission members who worked so selflessly on the report, along with many members of our archdiocesan staff, did their service with extraordinary dedication, integrity and concern for the needs of our people. They deserve our thanks and respect. They do not deserve the bitter - and unjust - criticism some parents and students have shown them.

Catholic schools exist, first and foremost, to form believing Catholic Christians; people of the Gospel; people of justice, mercy and charity. If they produce something less, then we need to ask ourselves whether they deserve to survive.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each Thursday morning on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.htm.

Contact
Donna M. Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Addresses Rumors Regarding Review Process For Schools Recommended To Close Or Regionalize

January 13, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA ADDRESSES RUMORS REGARDING REVIEW PROCESS FOR SCHOOLS RECOMMENDED TO CLOSE OR REGIONALIZE

Rumors began circulating this morning that schools requesting a review of the Blue Ribbon Commission's recommendations would need to raise money in order to obtain a meeting. That is not the case at all.

As outlined previously, pastors, elementary school principals and high school presidents seeking an appeal have been asked to contact the Office of Catholic Education to request a meeting. Making that request is the only action needed to take part in the appeal process.

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Editor's Note: For further information on the appeal process, please visit http://www.faithinthefuture.com/blue-ribbon/appeals/.

Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Lead Thousands To The 39th Annual March For Life

January 19, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO LEAD THOUSANDS TO
THE 39TH ANNUAL MARCH FOR LIFE

Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will lead, for the first time as Archbishop of Philadelphia, thousands of faithful from the Archdiocese on the Annual March for Life in Washington, D.C. on Monday. This date marks the 39th anniversary of the Roe vs. Wade decision that legalized abortion in 1973.

The March for Life activities will begin with an Opening Mass at the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception. Archbishop Chaput will concelebrate the Vigil Mass with principal celebrant and homilist Cardinal Daniel DiNardo, Chairman of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops Pro-Life Committee, the night before the March.

Sunday, January 22, 2012
6:30 p.m.
Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception
400 Michigan Avenue, NE
Washington, D.C., 20017


Archbishop Chaput will be the main celebrant and homilist at a Mass the morning of the March for participants from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

Monday, January 23rd
10:00 a.m.
Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception
400 Michigan Avenue, NE
Washington, D.C., 20017


*** For Media Coverage of Bus Departures from Philadelphia: A bus from Roman Catholic High School for Boys departs for Washington, D.C. on Monday, January 23, 2012 at 7:30 a.m. from the corner of Vine and Broad Streets in Philadelphia. Four buses from Archbishop Ryan High School will depart from the school's main entrance on Academy Road at 6:15 a.m.

Buses transporting more than 100 seminarians will depart Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary in Wynnewood at 5:45 a.m. ***


The March for Life Rally will begin at the National Mall at 12:00 p.m. Participants from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will meet on the corner of Constitution Avenue and 6th Street - in front of the National Gallery of Art. They will process behind the Archdiocese of Philadelphia banner, which will be carried by seminarians from Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary. The March for Life is scheduled to begin at 1:00 p.m.

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Editor's Note: For more information please visit the Office for Respect Life at http://archphila.org/evangelization/resplife/resplife.htm

Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Pontifical Council For Healthcare Workers To Hold Conference At Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary

January 26, 2012

PONTIFICAL COUNCIL FOR HEALTHCARE WORKERS TO HOLD CONFERENCE AT SAINT CHARLES BORROMEO SEMINARY

Archbishop Zygmut Zimowski, President of the Pontifical Council for Healthcare Workers, will be the keynote speaker and offer reflections on the message of Pope Benedict XVI for the 2012 World Day for the Sick.

Saturday, February 11, 2011
11:00 a.m. (Conference)
3:30 p.m. (Mass)
Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary
100 East Wynnewood Road
Wynnewood, PA 19096 (Montgomery County)


This conference is open to the public free of charge with advance registration.

Philadelphia Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will be the homilist at a Mass celebrated for all participants by Archbishop Zimowski at the conclusion of the conference.

Following lunch, presenters at the conference will include: Dr. John Haas, Director of the National Catholic Bioethics Center; Mr. Ron Rak, President and CEO of Saint Peter Healthcare System; and Dr. Nayan Kothari, Associate Dean of Education at Drexel University.

The Pontifical Council for Healthcare Workers is a Vatican body. Its mission is to assist those who care for the sick and to spread the Church's teaching on the spiritual and moral aspects of illness as well as the meaning of human suffering.


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Editor's Note: To register for the conference please contact Connie Scharff at (215) 587-0504 or cscharff@adphila.org. Registration is free. Lunch will be available at the Seminary for a nominal fee.

Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Catholic Schools Week--how You And I Can Help

January 26, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
CATHOLIC SCHOOLS WEEK--HOW YOU AND I CAN HELP

Monday, January 29, begins Catholic Schools Week. It's a time to honor the unique value of Catholic education. Here in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, we have a long record of dedicated service by the women and men who teach in our classrooms and run the "business" of Catholic schools. That record includes the legacy of thousands of women and men religious and diocesan clergy. In the single academic year of 1963-64, more than 4,100 religious and 1,600 laypersons taught more than 263,000 students enrolled in our schools. Today, scores of our pastors make extraordinary commitments of parish funds to keep our schools open and excellent.

Unfortunately, schools run on resources, not simply good will and heroic service. Our schools can no longer count on unlimited Church support. The resources simply don't exist. Many of our parishes are financially strained. The archdiocese itself faces serious financial and organizational challenges that have been developing for many years and cannot be ignored.

So where does that leave us? We can honor Catholic Schools Week this year by actually doing something about the fiscal problems hurting our schools. We need to press our lawmakers, respectfully but vigorously, to pass school choice.

First, we need some clarity: School vouchers do not mean "government support for religious schools." That argument is flatly false. No vouchers go to any school, religious or otherwise. Vouchers do, however, return the power of educational choice to parents, where it belongs. In doing so, vouchers make all schools more accountable for the quality of education they deliver. Parents get the voucher. Parents choose the school. This makes perfect sense. And if a school offers a poor education for young people, parents will rightly vote with their feet -- and their vouchers. Of course, most Catholic schools do the opposite: They offer a strong education, in a safe environment, with a focus on developing good moral character. That's why parents are so upset when they close.

Some people argue that school choice legislation only helps families in poor areas. Helping the poor is obviously vital, and vouchers would accomplish that. But vouchers would also assist many more families than the poor.

If vouchers are approved, they will free up what's known as EITC funds -- Educational Improvement Tax Credit funds - along with other grant and scholarship monies for many thousands of other school families. In effect, the positive impact of vouchers translates to millions of dollars of additional educational resources potentially available to a wide range of school families each year - including Catholic school families.

Now here's an unhappy fact: In 2011, the bishops of Pennsylvania made the passage of vouchers one of their priority legislative issues. People like Bob O'Hara in our statewide Catholic bishops' conference and Jason Budd in our archdiocesan Office of Catholic Education worked hard to mobilize Catholic support. Their efforts failed - and not because they didn't try, but because too few people in the pews listened. Very few Catholics called or wrote their state senators and representatives. Even fewer visited their offices to lobby as citizens. Despite this, vouchers passed in the state senate, before stalling in the house. One non-Catholic school choice activist - who has poured years of his time and millions of dollars of his own resources into fighting for vouchers as a social justice issue - was baffled at the inability of Catholics to mobilize around an issue so obviously vital to the public interest and so clearly helpful to the survival of their own schools.

In the coming week I'll be writing every state senator and representative in the territory of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia to press them to support school vouchers. And I'll continue doing it until vouchers pass. I hope my brother bishops and pastors across the state will do the same. More importantly: Our Catholic people need to do the same. Elected officials do listen, and they act when the noise gets loud enough. If nothing else, the crisis of Philadelphia's Catholic schools is an unpleasant but finally very healthy wake up call. The bill for our failure to pass school choice over the past decade has come due. Now we're paying for it.

When vouchers stalled, yet again, in the Pennsylvania house last fall, a frustrated Catholic school teacher friend of mine said "Catholics are suckers." I don't believe that. But then, I'm new in town. If we Philadelphia Catholics love our Catholic schools, and we obviously do, then the time to get active and focused is now. We need to begin pressing our state lawmakers to pass the school choice legislation -- including vouchers and expanded EITC credits - that's currently pending in Harrisburg. And we need to do it this week, today, right now. I plan to do that. I hope you'll join me.
For more information on school choice, and to contact your legislator, please visit: http://tinyurl.com/PASchoolChoice

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each Thursday morning on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.htm.

Contact
Donna M. Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput Issues Call To Action On School Choice During Catholics Schools Week 2012

January 27, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT ISSUES CALL TO ACTION
ON SCHOOL CHOICE DURING CATHOLICS SCHOOLS WEEK 2012

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia will join in the national observance of Catholic Schools Week beginning January 29, 2012 through February 5, 2012. Catholic Schools Week is an annual celebration of the values-centered, faith-filled education that students receive in Catholic elementary, secondary and special education schools. The national theme for Catholic Schools Week 2012 is "Faith. Academics. Service."

In his weekly column: Catholic Schools Week - How you and I can help, Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., said, "We can honor Catholic Schools Week this year by actually doing something about the fiscal problems hurting our schools. We need to press our lawmakers, respectfully but vigorously, to pass school choice. School vouchers do not mean "government support for religious schools." That argument is flatly false. No vouchers go to any school, religious or otherwise. Vouchers do, however, return the power of educational choice to parents, where it belongs. In doing so, vouchers make all schools more accountable for the quality of education they deliver. Parents get the voucher. Parents choose the school. This makes perfect sense."

To read the Archbishop's full column, please visit www.catholicphilly.com. School families are urged to visit the Pennsylvania Catholic Conference website to join the advocacy network and send a message to their legislators at www.pacatholic.org/advocacy.

Total Enrollment (individual county numbers appear at the end of the release):
Parish Elementary Schools: 49,172
Archdiocesan High Schools: 15,172
Archdiocesan Schools of Special Education: 212


Catholic Schools Week Events in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia:


Bishop Michael J. Fitzgerald will be presented with a Catholic Schools Week decree
From Philadelphia Mayor Michael A. Nutter

11:00 a.m.
Tuesday, January 31, 2012
Archdiocesan Pastoral Center - Auditorium
222 North 17th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Sunday, January 29, 2012
Our Lady of Ransom Parish School: 6740 Roosevelt Boulevard, Philadelphia, PA 19149
11:00 a.m.
following a special Catholic Schools Week Mass, the school will host "Art on the Walls-Music in the Halls" featuring students' artistic accomplishments and instrumental musical talents.

Saint Jude Catholic Education Center: 323 West Butler Avenue, Chalfont, PA 18914
11:15 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.
St. Jude School will host an Open House following 10 a.m. Mass. Students in kindergarten through 8th grade have a Mercy Outreach partner whom they assist throughout the year. 7th and 8th grade students have selected Alex's Lemonade Stand as their Mercy Outreach partner. These students will sell lemonade and baked goods with proceeds going to Alex's Lemonade Stand. Proceeds will be presented to the organization in February.

Monday, January 30, 2012
Saint Ignatius of Antioch Parish School: 995 Reading Avenue, Yardley, PA 19067
9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
students will decorate cake boxes and fill them with their donated items needed for a birthday party such as, cake mixes, plates, napkins and birthday candles for delivery to Loaves and Fishes Pantry in Fairless Hill.

Saint Isidore Parish School: 603 West Broad Street, Quakertown, PA 18951
9:00 a.m.
the school community is welcoming their new friends from Saint Philip Neri Parish School (East Greenville, PA). The day will begin with a prayer service followed by a meet and greet with their new classmates.

Saint Bernadette Parish School: Bond & Turner Avenues, Drexel Hill, PA 19026
10:30 a.m.
students are celebrating their "community" by showing appreciation for the Mayor of Upper Darby, Thomas N. Micozzie, as well as local police and firefighters by singing songs and performing skits.

Mary, Mother of the Redeemer Parish School: 1321 Upper State Road, North Wales 19454
12:30 p.m.
kick-off of Soup for the Super Bowl, Mary, Mother of the Redeemer Parish School vs. St. Andrew Parish School (Newtown). The two schools are teaming up for a friendly competition to benefit Nutritional Development Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Students will cast their vote for their Super Bowl team with each can of soup that is donated. At the end of each day (quarter) the two schools will Skype to see who is in the lead. On Friday the winning team will be announced.

Saint Madeline-Saint Rose Parish School: 500 Tome Street, Ridley Park, PA 19078
1:00 p.m.
veterans who have recently returned home from serving our country will speak with the student body. At the conclusion of the talk students will honor the Veterans with cards expressing their gratitude for their service.

Tuesday, January 31, 2012
Visitation BVM Parish School: 190 North Trooper Road, Norristown, PA 19403
9:30 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
Student Service Day: Students will honor local leaders and public servants by writing letters.

Archdiocesan Pastoral Center: 222 North 17th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103
11:00 a.m.
Bishop Michael J. Fitzgerald, who oversees Catholic Education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, will be presented with a Catholic Schools Week decree from Mayor Michael A. Nutter.

Saint Norbert Parish School: 6 Greenlawn Road, Paoli, PA 19301
2:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
the Chester County Police Canine Unit will speak to the student body on how they protect the community by using specially trained dogs. The county's canine unit is funded through donations only. On Wednesday, February 1, 2012 from 1:15 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. the school, whose mascot is the "Bulldog," will hold a "Dogs for Dogs" dance-a-thon with all proceeds going to the Chester County Police Canine Unity.

Wednesday, February 1, 2012
Saint Eleanor Parish School: 701 Locust Street, Collegeville, PA 19426
9:00 a.m. - 11:00 a.m.
students will collect care package items and write letters to service men and women stationed in Afghanistan.

Our Lady of Grace Parish School: 300 Hulmeville Avenue, Penndel, PA 19047
10:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
"Project Sock Hop" Students have earned money by doing chores at home to buy socks, hats and gloves to donate to the homeless.

Saint Anastasia Parish School:
4:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
the faculty and staff of Saint Anastasia Parish School will work at the local McDonald's, 3524 West Chester Pike, Newtown Square, PA 19073, cooking and serving meals to school families. Proceeds from the evening's sales will be donated to a family in the parish.

Thursday, February 2, 2012
Saint Anthony-Saint Joseph Parish School: 260 Forest Avenue, Ambler, PA 19002
8:30 a.m. -10:15 a.m.
the school is closing and joining with two other schools to form a regional school. The administration is using this opportunity to discuss how the "winds of change" can be used as a force for improvement in their lives. They have faith that the changes are happening for the good. The school community will participate in a "Winds of Change" showcase. In the days leading up to the showcase, students will read the book "Leif Catches the Wind" (a story about mechanical engineering). Students will work in their classrooms to design a functioning windmill based on the directions given in the book. During Catholic Schools Week, students will meet in multi-age groups to design a larger, improved windmill. They will be given a $50.00 budget and need to buy supplies within that budget to create their new windmill, which will be functional.

Saint Andrew Parish School: 535 Mason Avenue, Drexel Hill, PA 19026
10:30 a.m.
as part of their ongoing school project, students will Skype with troops at Camp Leatherneck. Items for care packages have been collected over the last two weeks. Students will pack items and prepare them for shipping. Students' letters to the marines will go in each package sent.

Our Lady of the Assumption Parish School: 135 Fairfield Lane, Strafford, PA 19087
10:00 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
students are participating in a Baby Drive in conjunction with Our Lady of the Assumption Parish outreach and bringing in items such as diapers, formula and wipes to donate to families in need. Students will prepare packages and make cards to send to families.

Bishop McDevitt High School: 125 Royal Avenue, Wyncote, PA 19095
9:05 a.m. - 10:30 a.m.
will host its 7th annual Papal Colloquium. Bishop John McIntyre will celebrate the opening liturgy. 10:35 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. Mr. Brian Butler will give the keynote address on the topic of "Theology of the Body." Over 400 student leaders from throughout the Archdiocese will be present.

Nativity of Our Lord Parish School:
7:00 p.m.
Father Angelo Citino, Pastor of Nativity of Our Lord Parish and Ms. Roselee Maddaloni, Principal of Nativity of Our Lord Parish School, will accept commendation from Warminster Township, 401 Gibson Avenue Warminster, PA 18974, at their Supervisors Meeting recognizing the awarding of the National Blue Ribbon School of Excellence to Nativity of Our Lord Parish School.

Friday, February 3, 2012
Saint Christopher Parish School, 13305 Proctor Road, Philadelphia, PA 19116
10:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.
students are participating in their own version of "Are Your Smarter Than a St. Christopher's Student?" The event is taking place in Trainer Hall.

Saint Mary Interparochial School, Fifth and Locust Streets, Philadelphia, PA 19106
11:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
alumni are invited to talk to students in grades 7 and 8 about their professional experiences.

Saint Anthony-Saint Joseph Parish School: 260 Forest Avenue, Ambler, PA 19002
10:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.
an alumnus of Saint Anthony-Saint Joseph is planning a dance-a-thon at the school to benefit families who have children with cancer. The former student is an active member in the "THON" movement at The Pennsylvania State University.

Bishop Shanahan High School, 220 Woodbine Road, Downingtown, PA 19335
8:40 a.m. - 9:57 a.m.
celebrate the Service Day! Former student Derek Fiorenza will give a short presentation to students about the importance of giving "service" to school and community. Students who are of service to the school community will be nominated by teachers and coaches and will be recognized with a certificate.

Saturday, February 4, 2012
Saint Helena Parish School:
6:30 p.m. - Midnight.
the Home and School Association is sponsoring "Hooray for Hollywood" Gala at Blue Bell Country Club all proceeds going to the school's technology program. The evening will include a silent and live auction.

Important Facts To Know About Archdiocesan Schools:


Parish and Regional Elementary Schools: Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery and Philadelphia Counties
Bucks County: 20 schools, 6,463 students
Chester County: 16 schools 5,435 students
Delaware County: 29 schools, 8,291 students
Montgomery County: 34 schools, 9,930 students
Philadelphia County: 57 schools, 19,161 students
Total schools: 156 elementary schools
Total enrollment: 49,172

High Schools: Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery and Philadelphia Counties
Bucks County: 2 schools, 1,615 students
Chester County: 1 school, 1,197 students
Delaware County: 3 schools, 3,286 students
Montgomery County: 3 schools, 2,251 students
Philadelphia County: 8 schools, 6,823 students
Total schools: 17 secondary schools
Total enrollment: 15,172

Special Education: 4 Schools of Special Education
St. Lucy Day School for Children with Visual Impairments
Archbishop Ryan School for the Deaf
St. Katherine Day School
Our Lady of Confidence Day School
Total enrollment: 212

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Blue Ribbon Commission Update: Parish schools involved in the regionalization plan recommended by the commission continue to formalize their joint implementation teams and pursue key milestones in their facilitation process. The goal for these schools is to be prepared for open houses on March 25, 2012. For further updates, please visit www.faithinthefuture.com.

Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Operation Rice Bowl Kicks Off For The 37th Year

January 30, 2012

OPERATION RICE BOWL KICKS OFF FOR THE 37TH YEAR

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia is participating in Operation Rice Bowl for the 37th year in a row. Operation Rice Bowl is a nationwide effort administered by Catholic Relief Services (CRS) to alleviate hunger both locally and abroad through four components: prayer, fasting, learning, and giving. Bishop John J. McIntyre will preside at this year's kick-off.

Tuesday, January 31, 2012
1:00 p.m.
Visitation Food Cupboard
Cardinal Bevilacqua Community Center
2646 Kensington Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19125


Parishioners in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia donated almost $337,000 to Operation Rice Bowl during Lent 2011. Of that amount, about $85,000 stayed in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and helped the Office for Nutritional Development Services fight hunger in the region. The remainder was distributed to Catholic Relief Services to combat hunger and other basic human needs overseas.

Bishop McIntyre will bless the "rice bowls" before their distribution to the parishes and schools of the Archdiocese. Families are encouraged to place money they would have spent on meals in the "rice bowls" to remember those who are poor and hungry.



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Editor's Note: For more information on Operation Rice Bowl please contact Anne H. Ayella, CRS Archdiocesan Director at 267-262-8901. For more information on Catholic Relief Services please visit http://orb.crs.org

Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Cardinal Anthony Bevilacqua Dies At The Age Of 88 Updated To Include Funeral Arrangements

February 1, 2012

CARDINAL ANTHONY BEVILACQUA DIES AT THE AGE OF 88
UPDATED TO INCLUDE FUNERAL ARRANGEMENTS

Cardinal Anthony J. Bevilacqua, Archbishop Emeritus of Philadelphia, died on January 31, 2012 at the age of 88. Cardinal Bevilacqua died in his sleep at 9:15 p.m. at Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary, where he had resided since his retirement. Cardinal Bevilacqua served as Archbishop of Philadelphia from February 11, 1988 to October 7, 2003. He was elevated to the College of Cardinals on June 28, 1991.

"I was greatly saddened to learn of the death of my predecessor Cardinal Bevilacqua," said Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. of Philadelphia. "I encourage all Catholics in the Archdiocese to join me in praying for the repose of his soul and that God will comfort his family as they mourn his loss. Cardinal Bevilacqua has been called home by God; a servant of the Lord who loved Jesus Christ and His people."

As the leader of the Archdiocese for 15 years, Cardinal Bevilacqua initiated a renewal process called Catholic Faith and Life 2000 to bring non-practicing Catholics back to the Church. The renewal process culminated on October 22, 2000 with 40,000 Catholics participating in a candlelight procession on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway in Philadelphia. Cardinal Bevilacqua also reached out to Catholics in the Archdiocese through a weekly live call-in radio program and a monthly bulletin titled, "Voice of Your Shepherd." He regularly made pastoral visits to parishes, schools, nursing homes and other institutions throughout the Archdiocese and to people of all faiths through his visits to hospitals and prisons as well as ecumenical and interreligious outreach.

In January of 1998, with racial tensions flaring in areas such as Grays Ferry, North Philadelphia and West Philadelphia, the Cardinal issued "Healing Through Faith and Truth," a pastoral letter on racism regarded as one of the most important documents written during his tenure as Archbishop of Philadelphia.

"Racism is an intrinsic evil that separates us from God," he said in his letter. "It is a moral disease and it is contagious." The Cardinal called on "Catholics and all people of good will to pray that God will cast out the demon of racism wherever it exists."

Toward the end of his tenure, in 2002, a grand jury investigation began into allegations of clergy sexual abuse which eventually led to the 2005 Grand Jury Report.

Cardinal Bevilacqua celebrated a Mass of Thanksgiving for Fifteen Years of Service in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia on July 12, 2003. At that time, the Cardinal addressed the faithful of the Archdiocese saying, "Thank you for the affection which you have given me throughout these years and for your active participation in the life of the Church. You have been for me over the years a great joy and gift from God."

Anthony Joseph Bevilacqua was born in Brooklyn, NY, on June 17, 1923. He was one of 11 children born to Luigi and Maria Bevilacqua. Following his 1943 graduation from Cathedral College, he attended Immaculate Conception Seminary in Huntington, NY. There he completed the six years of philosophy and theology requirements and was ordained on June 11, 1949 at St. James Cathedral, Brooklyn.

In 1956, he received his Doctorate in Canon Law (J.C.D.) Summa Cum Laude from Rome's Pontifical Gregorian University. In 1962, he received a Master of Arts degree in Political Science (M.A.) from Columbia University in New York. In 1975 Father Bevilacqua received a degree in Civil Law (J.D.) from St. John's University Law School in Queens, NY. He was admitted to practice as a civil lawyer before the Courts of New York State, the Courts of the State of Pennsylvania and the U.S. Supreme Court.

In 1971, the Bishop of Brooklyn appointed then-Father Bevilacqua as the Founding Director of the Catholic Migration and Refugee Office. In 1976, he was named Honorary Prelate by His Holiness Pope Paul VI with the title of Monsignor. Also in 1976, he was named Chancellor of the Brooklyn Diocese. He remained Chancellor of the Diocese and Director of its Migration and Refugee Office until 1983.

From 1968 to 1980, Monsignor Bevilacqua was visiting Professor of Canon Law at the Seminary of the Immaculate Conception in Huntington, New York. From 1977 to 1980, he also taught immigration law as an Adjunct Professor of Law at St. John's University Law School.

On November 24, 1980, he was ordained a Bishop and served as Auxiliary Bishop of the Diocese of Brooklyn until Pope John Paul II appointed him Bishop of the Diocese of Pittsburgh in 1983, where he served until his appointment as Archbishop of Philadelphia in 1987. As Archbishop of Philadelphia he also served as a member of various congregations and councils of the Holy See and committees of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

"Cardinal Bevilacqua's death comes at a time when the Archdiocese is facing extraordinary challenges," said Archbishop Chaput. "During this difficult period, I invite all of our people to come together in prayer for a renewal of our Church and Her mission."

Cardinal Bevilacqua is survived by his sister Madeline Langan of Bayville, New York and his brother Frank Bevilacqua of West Simsbury, Connecticut.

Funeral arrangements: Following a private viewing at Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary, Archbishop Chaput will receive the body at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul on Monday, February 6, 2012 at approximately 5:30 p.m. A public viewing will take place at the Cathedral Basilica from 5:30 p.m. until 9:00 p.m. There will also be a public viewing on Tuesday, February 7, 2012 from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

The Solemn Funeral Mass for Cardinal Bevilacqua will begin at 2:00 p.m. followed by the Rite of Committal in the Cathedral Crypt (located below the main altar). The celebrant for the Funeral Mass will be Archbishop Chaput and the homilist will be Monsignor Louis D'Addezio.

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Editor's Note: There will be pool coverage. Details are to be determined.

Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput Calls On Catholics To Pray, Act For Religious Liberty In Letter To Archdiocese: Hhs Ruling Is Flawed And Dangerous

February 2, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT CALLS ON CATHOLICS TO PRAY, ACT
FOR RELIGIOUS LIBERTY IN LETTER TO ARCHDIOCESE:
HHS RULING IS FLAWED AND DANGEROUS

Dear friends in Christ,

The United States Department of Health and Human Services announced on January 20 that almost all employers, including Catholic employers, will be forced to offer their employees health coverage that includes sterilization, abortion-inducing drugs, and contraception. Almost all health insurers will be forced to include those "services" in the health policies they write. And almost all individuals will be forced to buy that coverage as a part of their policies.

In so ruling, the current Administration has undermined both the principle of religious conscience and the First Amendment to the Constitution in an unprecedented way. Unless the ruling is overturned, faithful Catholics will be forced either to violate our consciences, or to drop health coverage for our employees and suffer the penalties for doing so. The Administration's only concession was to give our institutions a one-year delay to comply. This is not merely inadequate. It is dangerous. And it betrays the good faith of many Catholics who -- until now -- have supported the current Administration with an honest will.

Bishops and lay Catholic leaders across the United States have made it clear that we cannot comply with this unjust law without compromising our convictions and undermining the Catholic identity of many of our service ministries. This is not just another important issue among the many we need to be concerned about. This ruling is different. This ruling interferes with the basic right of Catholic citizens to organize and work for the common good as Catholics in the public square.

Today, I ask of you two things. First, we need to pray for our country, for our Church, and for our own right to work freely as a believing community through our ministries in the public square. Second, we need to act.

Please visit the Pennsylvania Catholic Conference website at www.pacatholic.org to learn how to contact your federal Representative and Senators. Write them, call them, visit them -- and help them understand the deep resistance of Pennsylvania Catholics to this dangerous ruling. Please also visit www.usccb.org/conscience, to learn more about this attack on religious conscience, and how to work to reverse the Administration's decision.

Your action on this issue matters -- not just today but for many years to come; and in ways that will shape the ability of the Church to witness the Gospel publicly through her ministries well into the future. Please know that you have my gratitude and daily prayers. And please remember me in your prayers as well.

Most Reverend Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.
Archbishop of Philadelphia

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Editor's Note: This letter was distributed to all 266 parishes in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia with a request that it be read at all Masses this weekend.

Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Putting Our House In Order: On Stewardhsip, Accountability And The Work That Lies Ahead

February 3, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
PUTTING OUR HOUSE IN ORDER: ON STEWARDHSIP, ACCOUNTABILITY AND THE WORK THAT LIES AHEAD

When I wrote to the people of the Archdiocese on December 8 last year, I said that we'd face a great many legal and financial issues in 2012. Last Sunday, January 29, one of those challenges made Philadelphia Inquirer headlines. A senior member of the archdiocesan staff stole more than $900,000 of our people's resources before being discovered and fired last summer. Our normal outside auditing firm -- independent and nationally respected -- had previously found no evidence of criminal activity.

The story is not new. In fact, news media first reported this story last July. But neither the Church nor the District Attorney's office knew the scope of the loss until last fall. We've been silent on this matter until now for obvious reasons: to allow law enforcement to do its work. Circumstances have now changed.

People are angry about this loss, and they're right. So am I. There's no excuse for it. Non-profit organizations - like foundations, Churches, museums and many hospitals - tend to draw mission-driven people as staff. Most of their employees are honest. A few are not. And in a work environment based on shared beliefs and service, a dishonest person can do massive damage. Precisely because religious organizations run on the good will of the people they serve and the dedication of their staffs, they can easily become too trusting in their internal safeguards. But that only makes the need for tight financial controls and accounting procedures more urgent.

It's important to keep a few facts in mind as this story plays out over the coming weeks:

First, the theft occurred from the general operating funds of the Archdiocese. Monies donated to the Heritage of Faith, Vision of Hope capital campaign and the annual Catholic Charities Appeal were not impacted in any way. The theft also had no effect on the work of the Blue Ribbon Commission or the decision to close or regionalize any school.

Second, based on an outside forensic financial review conducted by the firms of ParenteBeard and BallardSpahr, the theft was confined to one senior staffer. No other archdiocesan staff persons were involved.

Third, the Archdiocese has worked with the District Attorney's office throughout this investigation. And we will vigorously pursue restitution from the wrong-doer.

Fourth, as bitter as this loss is, insurance will cover much of it. This is little comfort and absolves no one, but as an immediate concern, at least some of the damage will be made whole. Moreover, since Catholic Social Services, Catholic Health Care Services and similar ministries are separate entities from the Archdiocese, they suffered no loss from the theft.

Fifth and finally, when I arrived in Philadelphia in September, I began a comprehensive legal and financial review of archdiocesan operations conducted by experienced outside professionals. That independent review is continuing. We've begun to apply its recommendations in the way we steward the resources entrusted to the Church by our people. The recruitment of a new chief financial officer is nearing completion. The search for a new archdiocesan controller is also underway. New procedures are in place in the areas where the embezzlement occurred. In the coming year, new and much more rigorous internal controls will take effect, along with tighter budget discipline and a demand for improved skills in everyone tasked with the management of archdiocesan resources. To their credit, Bishop Timothy Senior, our moderator of the curia, and Marc Fisher, the new director of our internal auditing efforts, have been a great help in this difficult process.

The task ahead is large. But protections are already in effect to help prevent this kind of damaging criminal activity in the future. Working with our Archdiocesan Priests' Council, our Archdiocesan Finance Council and the Archdiocesan Pastoral Council now in formation, I do promise that every aspect of our shared life as a Church will be subject in the years ahead to the kind of clarity, greater accountability and careful stewardship our people deserve.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.htm.

Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Media Advisory: Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Holds Press Conference To Launch 2012 Catholic Charities Appeal

February 8, 2012

MEDIA ADVISORY:
ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA HOLDS PRESS CONFERENCE TO LAUNCH 2012 CATHOLIC CHARITIES APPEAL

Today, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia announces the launch of the 2012 Catholic Charities Appeal, the single greatest fundraising initiative in the Archdiocese supporting Catholic Charities. Through the support of more than 80 programs within the Philadelphia-region - including educational programs for disabled children, soup kitchens, senior centers and hospices - Catholic Charities Appeal cares for more than 200,000 people every year.

Bishop John J. McIntyre, Temple University Head Basketball Coach Fran Dunphy, St. Joseph's University Head Basketball Coach Phil Martelli, Philadelphia Department of Human Services Deputy Commissioner Vanessa Garrett-Harley and long-standing Catholic Charities Appeal donor Dr. Rich Vassallo will offer remarks during the afternoon press conference.

News Conference
2:00 p.m.
Thursday, February 9, 2012
Mercy Hospice
334 South 13th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19107


The Catholic Charities Appeal funds the Catholic Social Services programs of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, including afterschool programs, community food cupboards, programs for dependent and delinquent youth and housing for the homeless, such as Mercy Hospice. Opened in 1976 to assist homeless women stabilize their lives and achieve self-sufficiency, Mercy Hospice provides housing and social services to women - and mothers with young children - in recovery from substance abuse.

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Editor's Note: For information about The Catholic Charities Appeal please contact 215-587-3651 or visit www.catholiccharitiesappeal.org.

Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Catholic Charities And The Work Of The Gospel

February 9, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
CATHOLIC CHARITIES AND THE WORK OF THE GOSPEL

Every year at this time we embark on a critically important campaign for our local Church: the Catholic Charities Appeal. Here's why it's so vital - especially now.

When we think of the Church, we usually think first of our own parish. That makes sense, because that's where we live out most of our lives as Catholics. At our parishes we encounter Jesus Christ in the Eucharist and the Word of God. It's where couples are married, babies are baptized, sins are confessed and families come together for the funerals of loved ones.

But a Catholic understanding of the Church is much broader than our parishes. In fact, each of our parishes is a local expression of the larger, archdiocesan Church. And each part of that larger Church, whether it be in the northern corner of Bucks County or the heart of Philadelphia, is an essential part of the body of Christ.

The Catholic Charities Appeal is a key way of contributing to that community of faith which is the Church in southeastern Pennsylvania. We believe that the Church is the ongoing presence of Christ in the world. We're called as his Church to do as Jesus did, and that can be summarized in three simple duties.

The first thing the Church is called to do is to evangelize; in other words, to proclaim Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior, even when the Gospel message is unwelcome in the world around us.

The second mission of the Church is to build up the community of faith internally through education and fellowship.

The third thing the Church is called to do -- and which our archdiocese always seeks to do -- is to care for those who are in need, especially in rough economic times like today. Jesus didn't require people to believe in him before he loved them, healed them or entered their lives. As a Church, we have the duty to be the presence of Jesus Christ in the lives of others, even those who are not believers.

This is why I'm glad, and proud, to ask our Catholic community for financial help through the Catholic Charities Appeal. Money is a vital means of assisting others. In fact, the Acts of the Apostles describe Peter and Paul as often taking up collections for the poor and for the Mother Church in Jerusalem.

Giving of our resources is an important sign of faith. All of us as believers, bishops and other clergy included, should tithe all that we have back to God -- ideally, 10 percent of our incomes; but if that's not possible, at least some regular, sacrificial percentage of our personal resources.

The more generous we are with God, the more God gives back to us. Our annual Catholic Charities Appeal campaign is -- quite literally -- the lifeblood of more than 80 archdiocesan ministries. The Appeal supports, in various ways, everything from our schools for special education, to Catholic Human Services, to youth and young adult ministry, to our prolife efforts, to aid for our elderly and infirm priests. In other words, the Appeal is absolutely vital to the on-going work of the Church in southeastern Pennsylvania.

I'm grateful for the gift of being called to Philadelphia to serve as your bishop. Because of that call, one of my duties is to invite each of you to respond to the work of the Holy Spirit in your own lives. We should thank God every day for our time in this world, our families and our sustenance; and when we do, we should also remember the vocation God gave to each of us at our baptism: a vocation to help him remake and renew the world in Christ's name.

The work of the Gospel won't happen in a vacuum, and it can't happen without the resources to pursue it. So please be as generous as possible this year when you're asked to contribute to the Catholic Charities Appeal. Many, many deserving ministries depend on the success of the Appeal -- which means, ultimately, that they depend on you and me. God bless you for your kindness.

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Editor's Note: Columns are published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.htm.

Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Launches 2012 Catholic Charities Appeal

February 9, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA LAUNCHES
2012 CATHOLIC CHARITIES APPEAL

Today, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia announces the official kick-off of the 2012 Catholic Charities Appeal, the single largest fundraising initiative in the Archdiocese supporting the charitable works of the Church. This year, the Catholic Charities Appeal and Philadelphia Archbishop Charles Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., have set a fundraising goal of $10 million.

"Through the support of the Catholic Charities Appeal, more than 80 programs of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia are able to provide help and create hope for thousands of individuals and families in need every day," said Archbishop Chaput. "Together, we can dramatically transform the lives of those who need it the most by feeding the hungry, sheltering the homeless and providing for the poor. Continued support from our faith community is essential in order to carry out these powerful services for so many and to make a lasting, positive impact on our city of Philadelphia and its surrounding communities."

The Catholic Charities Appeal funds many programs of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, including housing and meals for the homeless, senior and family service centers, afterschool programs, community food cupboards and residential and community-based academic programs for dependent and delinquent youth, developmentally disabled and special needs children. Donations to the Appeal enable these programs to continue providing help and creating hope for more than 200,000 people each year. Of every dollar contributed to the Appeal, 92 cents directly benefits those in need throughout the five-county region served by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. This rate is considerably better than industry standards for non-profit organizations and demonstrates the efficiency of the organizations funded by the Catholic Charities Appeal.

"Catholic Social Services changed my life for the better," said Camille Turner, a Mercy Hospice alumna, which assists homeless women and women in recovery from substance abuse to stabilize their lives and achieve self-sufficiency. "The devoted, loving staff at Mercy Hospice gave me the hope and resources to get back on the right track. Without Mercy Hospice, I don't know where I would be today."

Founded in 1958 by John Cardinal O'Hara, the Catholic Charities Appeal funds over 80 agencies throughout the five counties of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. The services that the Archdiocese provides reflect a belief in the sanctity of all human life, the inherent dignity of every person, and the central role of the family in life and society.

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Editor's Note: For information about the Catholic Charities Appeal please contact 215-587-3651 or visit www.catholiccharitiesappeal.org.

Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Announcement Regarding The Resignation Of Brother Timothy Ahern, F.s.c.

February 9, 2012

ANNOUNCEMENT REGARDING THE RESIGNATION
OF BROTHER TIMOTHY AHERN, F.S.C.

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia Office of Catholic Education announces that with great reluctance it has accepted the resignation of Brother Timothy Ahern, F.S.C., President of West Philadelphia Catholic High School, effective immediately.

As President for the past seven years Brother Tim was a model leader who worked with faithfully and enthusiastically on behalf of the students, faculty, and staff of West Catholic. A proud alumnus himself, Brother Tim had previously served on the faculty at West Catholic from 1971-1979. As a teacher and an administrator he profoundly impacted the lives of countless students in a positive way.

Following the announcement of the Blue Ribbon Commission's recommendations last month, Brother Tim elected not to appeal the proposed closure of West Catholic. His decision, which was based on facts related to future enrollment projections, was made with a heavy heart. He did not wish to raise false hopes through an appeal. Unfortunately, that decision created an untenable atmosphere for Brother Tim within the school.

Bishop Michael Fitzgerald, who oversees Catholic education in the Archdiocese said, "I was deeply saddened to learn of Brother Tim's resignation. He loves West Catholic with all of his heart. His care for each and every member of the school community was evident in the devotion and dedication he put into his work." Bishop Fitzgerald continued, "If not for Brother Tim's leadership, hard work, and innovative partnerships with business leaders, alumni and alumnae, West Catholic very likely would have closed several years ago. Those who have benefitted from the school's fine tradition of educational excellence during his tenure owe him a debt of gratitude."

The Office of Catholic Education has assigned Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Dr. Thomas Rooney, to serve as the interim president at the school for the remainder of the year.

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Editor's Note: For more information about the Blue Ribbon Commission's recommendation to close West Philadelphia Catholic High School please visit http://tinyurl.com/FITFWestCatholic.

Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Confirmation Schedule - Spring 2012 (as Of February 13, 2012 - Subject To Change)

February 16, 2012

CONFIRMATION SCHEDULE - SPRING 2012

(as of February 13, 2012 - subject to change)

CELEBRANT: ARCHBISHOP CHARLES J. CHAPUT, O.F.M. CAP.

Friday, March 16, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Mary, Mother of the Redeemer, North Wales,

Saturday, March 17, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Mary, Mother of the Redeemer, North Wales

Thursday, March 22, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Alphonsus, Maple Glen

Friday, March 30, 2012, 6:00 p.m., Saint Thomas the Apostle, Glen Mills

Saturday, March 31, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Saint Thomas the Apostle, Glen Mills

Saturday, April 14, 2012, 5:30 p.m., Saint Agatha-Saint James, Philadelphia

Sunday, April 15, 2012, 11:00 a.m., Saint Frances Cabrini, Fairless Hills

Tuesday, April 17, 2012, 6:00 p.m., Saint Eugene, Primos

Thursday, April 19, 2012, 6:00 p.m., Immaculate Conception, Levittown

Friday April 20, 2012, 6:00 p.m., Saint Rocco, Avondale

Saturday, April 21, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Saint Rocco, Avondale

Sunday, April 22, 2012, 12:00 Noon, Our Lady of Consolation, Parkesburg


CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND DANIEL E. THOMAS

Sunday, February 26, 2012, 9:00 a.m., Holy Cross, Philadelphia AND Saint Madeleine Sophie, at Saint Madeleine Sophie Church, Philadelphia

Tuesday, March 6, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint George, Glenolden

Saturday, March 10, 2012, 10:00 a.m and 2:00 p.m., Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Doylestown

Sunday, March 18, 2012, 11:00 a.m., Saint John Baptist Vianney, Gladwyne

Friday, March 23, 2012, 5:00 p.m., Saint Andrew, Newtown

Saturday, March 24, 2012, 9:30 a.m and 1:30 p.m., Saint Andrew, Newtown

Thursday, March 29, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Helena, Blue Bell

Saturday, April 14, 2012, 9:30 a.m and 1:00 p.m., Saint Agnes, West Chester

Sunday, April 15, 2012, 10:30 a.m., Saint Joseph Coatesville

Saturday, April 21, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Saint Matthias, Bala Cynwyd

Sunday, April 22, 2012, 12:00 Noon, Saint Colman, Ardmore

Tuesday, April 24, 2012, 5:00 p.m., Saint Joseph, Spring City

Saturday, April 28, 2012, 5:00 p.m., Saint Barnabas, Philadelphia

Sunday, April 29, 2012, 11:00 a.m., Our Mother of Consolation, Philadelphia

Sunday, May 6, 2012, 11:30 a.m., Saint Donato, Philadelphia

Tuesday, May 8, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Pius X, Broomall

Sunday, May 13, 2012, 11:00 a.m., Divine Mercy, Philadelphia

Sunday, May 20, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Saint Ann, Bristol

Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Mother of Divine Providence, King of Prussia

Thursday, May 24, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Lawrence, Riegelsville


CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND TIMOTHY C. SENIOR

Monday, March 5, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Joseph, Collingdale

Tuesday, March 13, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Our Lady of the Rosary, Coatesville

Thursday, March 22, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Albert the Great, Huntingdon Valley

Saturday, March 24, 2012, 10:00 a.m and 1:30 p.m., Saint Cornelius, Chadds Ford

Thursday, March 29, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Denis, Havertown

Saturday, March 31, 2012, 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m., Visitation B.V.M., Philadelphia

Tuesday, April 10, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Our Lady of Good Counsel, Southampton

Thursday, April 12, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saints Peter and Paul, West Chester

Saturday, April 14, 2012, 10:00 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., Saint Philip and James, Exton

Monday, April 16, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Charles Borromeo, Bensalem

Sunday, April 22, 2012, 11:00 a.m., Saint Augustine, Philadelphia

Saturday, April 28, 2012, 5:30 p.m., Saint Veronica, Philadelphia

Sunday, April 29, 2012, 12:00 Noon, Saint Laurence, Upper Darby

Saturday, May 5, 2012, 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m., Saints Simon and Jude, West Chester

Sunday, May 6, 2012, 11:00 a.m., Saint Philip Neri, Philadelphia

Tuesday, May 8, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint John the Baptist (Manayunk), Philadelphia

Wednesday, May 9, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint John the Evangelist, Morrisville

Friday, May 11, 2012, 7:00 p.m., Saint Hugh of Cluny, Philadelphia

Sunday, May 20, 2012, 3:00 p.m., Saint Mary, Schwenksville

Sunday, May 27, 2012, 11:00 a.m., Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul, Philadelphia

Wednesday, May 30, 2012, 7:00 p.m., Saint Thomas Aquinas, Philadelphia


CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND JOHN J. MCINTYRE

Monday, February 13, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Gabriel, Philadelphia

Thursday, March 8, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Francis Xavier-The Oratory, Philadelphia

Saturday, March 10, 2012, 11:00 a.m. Saint Katharine of Siena, Wayne

Thursday, March 15, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Joseph, Warrington

Tuesday, March 20, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Robert Bellarmine, Warrington

Thursday, March 22, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Katherine of Siena, Philadelphia

Tuesday, March 27, 2012, 5:00 p.m., Saint John the Baptist, Ottsville

Thursday, March 29, 2012, 4:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m., Saint Maximilian Kolbe, West Chester

Saturday, March 31, 2012, 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m., Saint Eleanor, Collegeville

Saturday, April 14, 2012, 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m., Saint Ignatius of Antioch, Yardley

Sunday, April 15, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Saint Francis of Assisi, Philadelphia

Tuesday, April 17, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Christopher, Philadelphia

Thursday, April 19, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Martin of Tours, Philadelphia

Tuesday, April 24, 2012, 5:00 p.m., Saint Luke the Evangelist, Glenside

Wednesday, April 25, 2012, 6:30 p.m., Saint Stanislaus, Lansdale

Thursday, April 26, 2012, 5:00 p.m., Saint Gabriel of the Sorrowful Mother, Avondale

Monday, April 30, 2012, 5:00 p.m., Saint Isidore, Quakertown

Tuesday, May 8, 2012, 5:30 p.m., Saint Peter, West Brandywine

Wednesday, May 9, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Assumption BVM, Feasterville

Thursday, May 10, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Matthew, Philadelphia

Monday, May 21, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Queen of the Universe, Levittown

Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Sacred Heart (Manoa), Havertown


CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND MICHAEL J. FITZGERALD

Sunday, February 5, 2012, 11:30 a.m., Sacred Heart, Clifton Heights,

Saturday, February 11, 2012, 10:30 a.m., Blessed Teresa of Calcutta, Limerick

Sunday, February 12, 2012, 11:30 a.m., Old Saint Joseph's, Philadelphia

Monday, February 13, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Epiphany of Our Lord, Philadelphia

Thursday, February 16, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Our Lady of Mount Carmel, Philadelphia

Saturday, February 18, 2012, 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m., Saint Patrick, Malvern,

Friday, February 24, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Our Lady of Ransom Philadelphia,

Sunday, February 26, 2012, 11:30 a.m., Saint Ambrose, Philadelphia

Wednesday, February 29, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Mary Magdalen, Media

Saturday, March 3, 2012, 10:00 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., Saint Joseph, Downingtown

Monday, March 5, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Gabriel, Norwood

Wednesday, March 7, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Maria Goretti, Hatfield

Saturday, March 10, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Our Lady of Guadalupe, Buckingham

Sunday, March 11, 2012, 11:15 a.m., Mater Dolorosa, Philadelphia

Wednesday, March 14, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Holy Cross, Springfield

Tuesday, March 20, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Maternity B.V.M., Philadelphia

Wednesday, March 21, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Genevieve, Flourtown

Sunday, March 25, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Saint Therese of the Child Jesus, Philadelphia

Monday, March 26, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Our Lady Help of Christians, Abington

Wednesday, March 28, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Epiphany of Our Lord, Plymouth Meeting

Friday, March 30, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Cecilia, Coatesville


CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND MARTIN H. LOHMULLER

Sunday, April 29, 2012, 3:00 p.m., Saint Cyril of Jerusalem, Jamison

Sunday, May 6, 2012, 3:00 p.m., Saint Cyril of Jerusalem, Jamison


CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND LOUIS A. DE SIMONE

Thursday, April 19, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Philip Neri, Lafayette Hill

Saturday, April 21, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Saint Monica, Berwyn

Sunday, April 22, 2012, 11:30 a.m., Saint Leo, Philadelphia

Friday, April 27, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Titus, Norristown

Sunday, May 6, 2011, 10:00 a.m., Saint Athanasius, Philadelphia

Sunday, May 20, 2012, 3:00 p.m., Saint Theresa of Avila, Norristown


CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND ROBERT P. MAGINNIS

Thursday, March 15, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Norbert, Paoli

Sunday, March 18, 2012, 1:00 p.m., Saint Thomas of Villanova, Rosemont

Tuesday, March 20, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Joseph, Aston

Saturday, March 24, 2012, 10:00 a.m. & 2:00 p.m., Saint Bede the Venerable, Holland

Tuesday, March 27, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Joseph the Worker, Fallsington

Thursday, March 29, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Nativity, B.V.M., Media

Thursday, April 12, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Mark, Bristol

Saturday, April 14, 2012, 10:30 a.m., Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton, Bensalem

Tuesday, April 17, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Francis of Assisi, Springfield

Thursday, April 19, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Patrick, Norristown

Sunday, April 22, 2012, 2:30 p.m., Saint Monica, Philadelphia

Tuesday, May 1, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Timothy, Philadelphia

Thursday, May 10, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Agnes, Sellersville

Saturday, May 12, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Saint Charles Borromeo, Drexel Hill


CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND JOSEPH F. MARTINO

Sunday, February 12, 2012, 11:00 a.m., Our Mother of Sorrows & Saint Ignatius of Loyola at Saint Ignatius of Loyola Church

Wednesday, February 15, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Cyril of Alexandria, Lansdowne

Saturday, February 25, 2012, 10:30 a.m., Saint Cecilia, Philadelphia

Monday, February 27, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Basil the Great, Kimberton

Tuesday, February 28, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Bernadette, Drexel Hill

Thursday, March 1, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Nativity of Our Lord, Warminster

Thursday, March 8, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Blessed Virgin Mary, Darby

Monday, March 12, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint John Chrysostom, Wallingford

Tuesday, March 13, 2012, 4:30 p.m., Our Lady of the Sacred Heart, Hilltown

Thursday, March 15, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Jerome, Philadelphia

Monday, March 19, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Hilary of Poitiers, Rydal

Thursday, April 12, 2012, 4:30 p.m., Saint Thomas More, Pottstown

Wednesday, April 18, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Andrew, Drexel Hill

Wednesday, April 25, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Visitation B.V.M., Norristown

Saturday, April 28, 2012, 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m., Saint Elizabeth, Uwchlan

Saturday, May 5, 2012, 11:00 a.m., Saint John Neumann, Bryn Mawr

Monday, May 7, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Patrick, Kennett Square

Tuesday, May 22, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Our Lady of the Assumption, Strafford

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Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: It's Not A 'compromise,' And It Needs To Be Rescinded

February 16, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
IT'S NOT A 'COMPROMISE,' AND IT NEEDS TO BE RESCINDED

Creighton Abrams, arguably America's best general in recent history, was an uncommon man. A biographer said that "he touched those who came to know him in a way they valued and would never forget." It's easy to see why. He led by example. He embodied the virtues of courage, honesty, dedication to mission, personal humility and unfailing fidelity to his wife and six children over a marriage of 38 years.

Abrams never degraded his opponents. He never demeaned himself by demeaning others. He lived by the highest ethical standards, and he demanded the same from the people around him. One of his favorite sayings was "Never wrestle with pigs: You get dirty, and the pigs love it."

Those words came back to me this past week. The trigger was the fierce public debate over the Obama administration's misleading February 10 "compromise" on a Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) mandate. The original HHS mandate, announced on January 20, would have forced nearly all Catholic institutions, organizations and private employers to provide contraception and abortifacients as part of their health coverage.

As many Catholic legal scholars have observed: The February 10 "compromise" does not solve the problem. It continues, in its practical effect, to force faithful Catholic employers to violate their religious beliefs. In short, the HHS mandate is coercive and deeply troubling in its implications for the rights of conscience. Nor is this accidental. The administration, despite the good will it has enjoyed from many Catholics, has taken a path that it knows to be unnecessary and knows to be hostile to Catholic belief.

The contempt dumped on Catholic teaching in our mass media over the past few days of debate tells us quite a lot about our critics. It also underlines the need for fighting respectfully but vigorously for what we believe. When a columnist in a major news daily claims, for example, that "The Catholic Church basically endorses one form of birth control, the rhythm method, which is contraception for stupid people," we can learn two things: Neither accuracy nor civility matters when it comes to demeaning how faithful Catholics try to live their lives. In the task of pushing birth control, sneering is fully licensed.

Of course, people are free to join or leave the Catholic community. They're free to criticize Catholic belief in any way they choose. But they're not free to force Catholic institutions, organizations and individual employers into violating their religious convictions. They're not free to mislead the public about a flawed and dangerous HHS mandate. And they're not free to ignore the concerns of Catholic citizens who are rightly angry about the current administration's indifference to religious freedom and the rights of conscience.

A friend of Creighton Abrams once said that, despite his humility and mastery of self, when it came to matters of principle, he "could inspire aggressiveness in a begonia." It's an interesting line. The Christian life does not need aggression. It doesn't return hatred with more hatred. Living the Gospel depends on virtues like justice, charity and mercy. But it also depends on courage. It does require fortitude. And that means a great many Catholics need to wake up and take a hard look at what's happening to our country. They may not like what they see. They shouldn't like what they see. And if they don't, they need to fight -- without apologies -- to turn things toward the good.

The current HHS mandate is not a real "compromise." It's bad law with very dangerous implications. It needs to be rescinded, and it doesn't matter how ugly or deceptive our critics choose to be. I ask every Catholic who reads these words and takes his or her faith seriously, to please contact your U.S. senators and representative. Do it today. Press them to rescind this destructive HHS mandate.

I know: We all have so many issues that compete for our daily attention. We're often tempted to ignore the whole lot.

But this one is urgent. This one really matters.

[Please visit the Pennsylvania Catholic Conference website at www.pacatholic.org to learn how to contact your federal Representative and Senators].

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Editor's Note: Columns are published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.htm.

Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Announces Final Decisions Of Blue Ribbon Commission Appeals For Elementary Schools High School Decision Delayed Due To New Proposals

February 17, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA ANNOUNCES FINAL DECISIONS OF BLUE RIBBON COMMISSION APPEALS FOR ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

HIGH SCHOOL DECISION DELAYED DUE TO NEW PROPOSALS

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced today that Archbishop Charles Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., has reviewed and accepted the recommendations regarding elementary schools from the Review Committees assigned to hear appeals to the school restructuring outlined by the Blue Ribbon Commission. The recommendations regarding the high schools will be delayed approximately one week. The postponement is due to recently received information regarding potential donors that has to be explored before any decision is made. Archbishop Charles Chaput, O.F.M. Cap, Archbishop of Philadelphia, said, "I recognize how anxious all of those affected by this decision are to hear the final outcome. I want to see this resolved too but this decision is too important to be made without considering absolutely every fact and all serious, substantive proposals even if they don't fit the time frame originally set. We owe it to our teachers, administrators, students and school families."

Following the January 6, 2012 announcement when the Archbishop received the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Commission, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia established an appeals process to allow schools the opportunity to present fact-based evidence in support of their position to remain open or not merge.

The Review Committee, which consisted of members of the Blue Ribbon Commission and Archdiocesan administrators, began hearing appeals on January 12, 2012. At these meetings, the Review Committee presented the facts considered by the Blue Ribbon Commission in reaching its recommendation to the school administrators, and school administrators were given the opportunity to present the rationale for their appeal along with supporting facts and documentation.

"The Review Committee listened with open minds and hearts, but knew it would take hard facts to change the recommendations made by the Blue Ribbon Commission," said Archbishop Chaput. "After all, the intent of the Blue Ribbon Commission was to create a strategic plan for stabilizing and reinvigorating Catholic education in our diocese, so any decision to alter the Commission's recommendations was given a great deal of consideration as to its short- and long-term impact."

The Archbishop agreed with the assessment completed by the Review Committee to alter 18 of the original recommendations for elementary schools to close, partner or merge. These recommendations were changed for a variety of reasons, including: some schools will remain parish schools because they have demonstrated that their school is poised for long-term sustainability, some schools may be closed outright to allow welcoming schools to maintain their identity, and other schools will still form regional schools, but perhaps in a different location that may be better suited for the schools.

In addition to the appeals outcomes, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia also announced today that a plan is underway to structure and fund up to 14 mission schools to ensure their long-term viability. The committed and engaged community leaders have completed a similar mission program at St. Martin de Porres School, and hope that this effort will be replicated once funding is able to be secured.

"We are pleased to be working with these Catholic community leaders, who have stepped forward at such a critical time for Catholic education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia," said Archbishop Chaput. "This entire Blue Ribbon Commission process has led people to approach us with creative ideas, solutions and resources that help us to continue our mission to provide families access to an affordable, quality Catholic education. We have engaged a whole new group of people and reengaged others that will help to make the future of Catholic education a bright one."

While there is no assurance that schools under review will ultimately become mission schools, the schools presently under consideration include: St. Helena and Incarnation of Our Lord partnered at the St. Helena site, Our Lady of the Blessed Sacrament and St. Donato partnered at the St. Donato site, St. Gabriel, St. Thomas Aquinas, St. Malachy, Visitation BVM, Our Mother of Sorrows/St. Ignatius, St. Rose of Lima, Mary, Mother of Peace, St. Martin of Tours, The DePaul Catholic School, St. Cyril of Alexandria, St. Peter the Apostle, and St. Veronica.

"This entire process is just a beginning to reinvigorating Catholic education," said Archbishop Chaput. "Let's not lose sight of the fact that legislation allowing parents to decide where their children go to school through opportunity scholarships and greatly expanded EITC, would be a game changer for our schools in the future."

A full list of schools affected by the Review Committees' recommendations can be viewed at www.faithinthefuture.com.

###

Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Ash Wednesday In The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Catholics Throughout The Philadelphia Region Mark The Beginning Of Lent

February 21, 2012

ASH WEDNESDAY IN THE ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA
Catholics throughout the Philadelphia region mark the beginning of Lent

Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will be the principal celebrant at Mass and distribute blessed ashes at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul.

Catholics in 266 parishes across the Archdiocese will attend Mass and receive ashes on their foreheads which are marked in the sign of a cross to remind them of their mortality as Lent 2012 begins with Ash Wednesday.


Wednesday, February 22, 2012
12:05 p.m.
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Ash Wednesday signifies the beginning of Lent for Christians throughout the world. Lent is the 40-day penitential season of prayer and sacrifice lasting from Ash Wednesday through Holy Thursday in preparation for Easter.

Beginning next week parishes throughout the five-county Archdiocese will offer the Sacrament of Reconciliation each Wednesday evening from 7:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the duration of the Lenten Season.

The Bishops of the United States prescribe, as a minimal obligation, that all persons who are fourteen years of age and older abstain from eating meat on Ash Wednesday, on all the Fridays of Lent and Good Friday. Further, all persons eighteen years of age and older, up to and including their fifty-ninth birthday, are bound to fast by limiting themselves to a single full meal on Ash Wednesday and on Good Friday.

During the Season of Lent this year, Catholic schools throughout the region are partnering with Nutritional Development Services (NDS) of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia to fight hunger. School families are being asked to take part in the "One Can-One Meal" program by donating canned food items that will be used in food cupboards, soup kitchens and shelters to assist the needy. NDS supports approximately 50 food cupboards in the greater Philadelphia area and serves approximately 10.5 million meals annually.

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Editor's Note: For Ash Wednesday Mass in the Cathedral an audio and video mult-box feed will be provided. Crews will need a bnc connector and recording deck or a live truck. Television cameras will not be permitted in the Cathedral. Reporters and still photographers will be permitted in the Cathedral.

Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Steeples And Cross To Be Placed On New Blessed Teresa Of Calcutta Church

February 21, 2012

STEEPLES AND CROSS TO BE PLACED ON
NEW BLESSED TERESA OF CALCUTTA CHURCH

Steeples will be placed on the Blessed Teresa of Calcutta Parish Church in Schwenksville, Montgomery County on Ash Wednesday. Once the steeples are in place, Father Paul Brandt, Pastor, will ride a construction lift 100 feet into the air to place a 10 foot cross onto the steeple of the bell tower.

All of the students from Blessed Teresa of Calcutta Parish School as well as children in Child Care and many parishioners will gather in the parking lot to witness this historic event. The setting of the cross will take place around 10:00 a.m. immediately following Ash Wednesday Mass at 9:00 a.m.


10:00 a.m.
Wednesday, February 22, 2012
Blessed Teresa of Calcutta Parish
256 Swamp Pike
Schwenksville, PA 19473 (Montgomery County)



For more information please contact Father Paul Brandt, Pastor of Blessed Teresa of Calcutta Parish, at 215-651-4454.


# # #


Editor's Note: Ash Wednesday signifies the beginning of Lent for Christians throughout the world. Lent is the 40-day penitential season of prayer and sacrifice lasting from Ash Wednesday through Holy Thursday in preparation for Easter. For background information on Lent please visit www.archphila.org.

Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Re-orienting Our Lives To The Things That Matter

February 23, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
RE-ORIENTING OUR LIVES TO THE THINGS THAT MATTER

One of the defining moments of Jesus' public ministry takes place before his work even begins. In the Gospels of Matthew and Luke, God's Spirit leads Jesus into the desert for fasting and prayer. While there, Satan attacks him with temptations to vanity, worldly power and glory. In effect, Christ's knowledge of who he really is and the nature of his messiahship are put to the test. Pressed by the devil to turn stones into bread, a hungry and weakened Jesus nonetheless answers: "It is written, 'Man shall not live by bread alone, but by every word that proceeds from the mouth of God'" (Mt 4:4).

Reading the New Testament reminds us again and again that Christian discipleship has social implications. We have obligations of charity, mercy and justice to each other that bind us together as one human family. We cannot be saved alone. We prove our faith and we make our way to God through service to other people, especially the poor and the weak. The Epistle of James especially warns us that pious words alone do not make a Christian. James urges us to "be doers of the word and not hearers only" (Jas 1:22). And he stresses that "religion that is pure and undefiled before God and the Father is this: to visit orphans and widows in their affliction, and to keep oneself unstained from the world" (Jas 1:27).

We are in the world, and we have duties to help ease its needs. We're called to make it a more virtuous and humane place. But-and this is vital-we are not of the world. The material dimension of Gospel justice flows from a deeper and more important spiritual truth: We were created by God. We cannot be happy or whole without him.

Human beings are much more than mere animals or interesting biochemical systems. We have souls. Through Jesus Christ, we will live forever. Thus we have needs and longings that can never be satisfied by merely material things. There can be no real "justice" divorced from questions about man's final purpose and humanity's deeper spiritual hungers. Any social order that denies God or refuses to allow him space in the public life of its people fundamentally attacks its own legitimacy because it denies reality and trivializes the scope of the human person.

This week, on Ash Wednesday, Catholics around the world begin the holy season of Lent, one of the most sacred periods in the Christian year. Lent is a time for self-denial and prayer; a time to reconnect with Scripture; a time to purify ourselves and reconcile with God through the sacrament of penance. It's an invitation to humility, forgiveness of others, honest self-examination and repentance -- but also to growing joy, because with Easter, our redemption will be at hand.

Lent is a precious time and gift; a unique chance to reorient our lives toward those unseen but enduring things that really matter. This year, may God grant us the wisdom to use these weeks of Lent well. May we remember that we serve justice best by first giving ourselves to God; and then bringing the light of Jesus Christ to others through the witness of our lives, our words and our actions. There is no justice without truth; and only Jesus Christ is the way, the truth and the life.

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Editor's Note: Columns are published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.htm.

Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Announces New Chief Financial Officer

February 23, 2012

THE ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA ANNOUNCES
NEW CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced today that Timothy O'Shaughnessy, 48, has been named Chief Financial Officer of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia effective April 16, 2012.

O'Shaughnessy comes to the Archdiocese of Philadelphia from St. Joseph's Preparatory School in Philadelphia where he has served as Chief Financial Officer since 2008, responsible for overseeing all finance related matters including the school's budget, treasury and debt management and the yearly audit. Prior to that, O'Shaughnessy worked for ARAMARK most recently as a Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of the Business, Sports and Entertainment Group. His responsibilities included annual business planning, budgeting, improvement of internal accounting controls and participating in monthly operating reviews. While at ARAMARK, O'Shaughnessy also served on the company's Business Conduct Policy Committee which in part focused on improving internal controls and procedures to prevent loss.

"We face many financial challenges right now and going forward, and I'm grateful to have Tim O'Shaughnessy's skills as Chief Financial Officer," said Archbishop Charles Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. "Tim has the experience and ability to handle any financial situation, to create the controls and procedures to protect against loss, and to work very effectively in a mission driven organization. These gifts are vital as the Archdiocese works to put our house in order and restore the trust of our people and major donors."

O'Shaughnessy holds a bachelor's degree from LaSalle University in Business Administration and Accounting and a MBA from the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania. Earlier in his career he was a Certified Public Accountant in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. In addition, he currently serves on the Audit Committee for Holy Family University, is a Board Member of the Cristo Rey Philadelphia High School and is a Director of Polonia Bank.

Tim and his wife, Marianne, who have five children, are parishioners of St. Maximilian Kolbe Parish in West Chester.

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Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia To Announce Final Decisions Regarding Archdiocesan High Schools

February 24, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA TO ANNOUNCE FINAL DECISIONS REGARDING ARCHDIOCESAN HIGH SCHOOLS

Archbishop Charles Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., will make an announcement regarding the future of Catholic education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia following the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Commission in January. The final decisions regarding the four high schools, Conwell-Egan Catholic High School; Saint Hubert Catholic High School for Girls; Monsignor Bonner and Archbishop Prendergast Catholic High School; and West Philadelphia Catholic High School will be announced.

3:00 p.m.
Friday, February 24, 2012
Archdiocesan Pastoral Center
Auditorium
222 North 17th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103


The news conference will be streamed live on the Archdiocesan website at www.archphila.org.
An audio mult feed will be provided.

# # #

Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Announces The Creation Of The Faith In The Future Foundation, A New Vision For Our Catholic Schools Beginning With The Secondary System

February 24, 2012

THE ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA ANNOUNCES THE CREATION OF THE FAITH IN THE FUTURE FOUNDATION, A NEW VISION FOR OUR CATHOLIC SCHOOLS BEGINNING WITH THE SECONDARY SYSTEM

This independent foundation will be an affiliated partner of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and its Office of Catholic Education (OCE). All 17 high schools will continue under this new model including, Monsignor Bonner and Archbishop Prendergast, Conwell-Egan Catholic, St. Hubert's and West Catholic, which were slated for closure in June 2012.

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced today the creation of the Faith in the Future Foundation, which will which will support and guide the system of 17 Archdiocesan high schools and eventually assist the parish elementary schools, regional schools and schools of special education across the five-county Philadelphia region. The foundation is a private and independent entity focused on creating a growing, innovative, best-in-class and fiscally sustainable Catholic secondary educational system. The Faith in the Future Foundation will be chaired by Edward Hanway, former chairman and Chief Executive Officer of CIGNA Corporation, and its Board of Directors will be comprised of leaders from a multitude of vocations, professions, industries and philanthropic organizations. More, the Board of Directors will reflect the cultural, religious and ethnic diversity that is present within the region's Catholic high schools today.

As part of the creation of the Faith in the Future Foundation, the four Catholic secondary schools originally slated for closure in June 2012 - Conwell-Egan Catholic High School, Saint Hubert Catholic High School for Girls, Monsignor Bonner and Archbishop Prendergast Catholic High School and West Philadelphia Catholic High School- will now remain open. The foundation has agreed to guarantee funding for the secondary school system, through the next several years, as a concerted fundraising effort and a robust marketing initiative are undertaken to address the recommendations of the Blue Ribbon Commission.

These efforts will be concurrent with renewed advocacy by the foundation for the immediate passage of legislation providing opportunity scholarships to students who wish to attend an Archdiocesan school.

"The grassroots efforts to save these schools, coupled with the advocacy of legislators and the generosity of many who wish to make our schools healthy again brought us to this innovative new model for Catholic secondary education," said Archbishop Charles Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. "The Archdiocese and the Faith in the Future Foundation have much to do in putting these four high schools - and our entire system - on a strong footing. However, to make this new model truly successful, I strongly believe that beyond the fundraising and recruitment initiatives that will be implemented by the foundation, it is critical that we expand EITC funds and pass legislation for opportunity scholarships. We need this to help all of our schools survive -- not 'maybe' and not sometime in the future; but urgently, in this legislative session, right now."

Through generous donations of several anonymous donors but also through the individual fundraising efforts of Monsignor Bonner and Archbishop Prendergast, Conwell-Egan Catholic, St. Hubert's and West Catholic communities, the Faith in the Future Foundation has already secured two years of runway funding to address the cost of keeping the high schools open. To date, more than $12 million has been secured in cash and pledges, with a goal of $15 million by May 1, 2012. Additional funding will be necessary for this endeavor and the Faith in the Future Foundation, in concert with the 17 Archdiocesan high schools, has committed to raising an additional $15 million by June 2013 as well as a $70 million endowment for all schools by June 2017.

While a new executive management team will be created for the foundation, it is important to note that each of the 17 high schools within the system will maintain its President/Principal model, its own Board of Directors and its distinctive legacy identity including school colors, mascots and traditions. The Faith in the Future Foundation will offer strategic guidance as it relates to governance, fundraising, marketing and recruitment for the system and will work in close cooperation with the Office of Catholic Education.

"The Blue Ribbon Commission rightly identified many of the key issues facing our Catholic secondary schools and the report spoke to the need for a foundation to address those critical concerns," said Edward Hanway, a member of the Blue Ribbon Commission and Chairman of the Faith in the Future Foundation. "Although it wasn't anticipated that such a recommendation would come to fruition so quickly, this is the right time. Our Archdiocese is blessed with 17 Catholic high schools, all of which are outstanding and all of which serve their communities well. The creation of this independent foundation allows us to cultivate and share best practices in academics, extra-curricular activities, athletics, advancement and so many more areas. Further, we can now address - head on and across the entire system - the need for major funding, the need for stronger marketing and recruitment efforts and the need for legislation to provide opportunity scholarships to our students. We are committed to never traveling this path again and it starts today with the Faith in the Future Foundation."


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Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput Welcomes Almost 800 New Members Into The Catholic Church

February 28, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT WELCOMES ALMOST 800
NEW MEMBERS INTO THE CATHOLIC CHURCH

Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. welcomed almost 800 new Catholics to the Church at two celebrations this weekend at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul. These men and women will practice their faith at parishes throughout the five-county Archdiocese.

The Rite of Election of Catechumens and the Call to Continuing Conversion of Candidates signified an important step for 785 adults who have chosen to join the Catholic Church. During the Rite of Election, Archbishop Chaput received and blessed 384 candidates (those who have been baptized in other faiths) and 401 catechumens (those who have not been baptized).

After a reflective and intense period of prayer during Lent, the catechumens and candidates will become full members of the Catholic Church at the Easter Vigil Mass in their parishes on Saturday, April 7, 2012.

# # #



Editor's Note: For video of Archbishop Chaput's Homily please visit the CatholicPhilly YouTube Channel at http://tinyurl.com/RiteofElectionHomily.

Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Catholic Youth Organization (cyo) Holds 18th Annual Hall Of Fame Awards Dinner

February 28, 2012

CATHOLIC YOUTH ORGANIZATION (CYO) HOLDS
18th ANNUAL HALL OF FAME AWARDS DINNER

The Archdiocesan Office for Youth and Young Adults will celebrate the 18th Annual CYO Hall of Fame Awards Banquet to raise funds for the Office for Youth and Young Adults' programs while honoring men and women who give great witness to the Gospel message of Jesus Christ and serve as excellent Catholic role models for youth and young adults.

Thursday, March 1, 2012
6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m.
The Drexelbrook
Drexelbrook Drive & Valley Road
Drexel Hill, PA 19026 (Delaware County)


During the event the following individuals will be inducted into the CYO Hall of Fame:
Reverend Thomas Higgins
Mr. Matthew Manion
Mrs. Barbara D'Iorio Martino
Mr. Tom Thornton


In addition, Mr. Charles "Chic" Kelly, Junior, will receive the Tom Gola Award which was established by the CYO Hall of Fame committee to recognize an individual who has advanced him or herself and others through sports.

The CYO is one department of the Office for Youth and Young Adults, an Archdiocesan Office which supports school, parish and Church leaders in their mission to prepare youth and young adults to hear and respond to the call of Jesus Christ. Through spiritual, service, leadership development and athletics programs, the Office for Youth and Young Adults works to draw young people to responsible participation in the life, mission and work of the Catholic faith community as well as to foster the total personal and spiritual growth of each person. For more information about the CYO Hall of Fame Awards Banquet please call 215-965-4637.

Biographical information for the 2012 CYO Hall of Fame inductees and the Tom Gola Award recipient is as follows:

Reverend Thomas Higgins
A legend in Youth and Young Adult Ministry, Father Thomas Higgins is recognized for creativity and vision. Serving the Archdiocese for 15 years in the Office for Youth and Young Adults with Father Chuck Pfeffer, Len DiPaul, Steve Taylor and others, Fr. Tom found new ways to engage young people by establishing leadership, service, and educational programs. He took pleasure and pride in participating in many OYYA ministries such as Athletics, the T.O.D.A.Y. Program for persons with disabilities, Kujenga and Atrevete for African-American and Hispanic Youth, while always maintaining a keen sensitivity to issues of diversity.

As pastor of Holy Innocents Parish in Philadelphia, Father Tom promotes growth in cultural diversity serving people from over twenty countries, celebrating Mass in three languages, and having a school that includes neighborhood children as well as youngsters with visual and hearing impairments.

His passion and commitment to ministry has been an inestimable gift in the lives of those entrusted to his spiritual care!

Mr. Matthew Manion
A natural and humble leader, Matthew Manion is a true product of CYO having played CYO Sports for Saint Laurence Parish in Upper Darby while in elementary school. Matt was President of his parish and region CYO while attending Monsignor Bonner High School before he moved on to the University of Pennsylvania where he served as President of the Catholic Newman Center, while earning a Bachelor's Degree in Economics from the Wharton School of Business.

Matt was enjoying a successful career at the Franklin Mint until Divine Providence changed his life's direction. He joined Tim Flanagan and Father Chuck Pfeffer to begin The Catholic Leadership Institute where he is currently President and CEO, providing world class leadership formation to Catholic leaders.

Matt is a true example of discipleship. With his family, with board members and on the ball field, Matt is a true inspiration. He is a genuine 'Man of Faith,' who provides an example to be imitated.

Mrs. Barbara D'Iorio Martino
Barbara D'Iorio Martino is a woman whose love and commitment to family, Church and civic affairs has been manifested in countless ways.

As a native Philadelphian, Barbara attended Saint Athanasius Elementary School in Philadelphia, Little Flower High School and Chestnut Hill College where she obtained a Bachelors degree in Chemistry and would later be elected Chair of the Board of Directors.

With generosity of heart, spirit and great talent, Barbara has provided extraordinary service and leadership in various Catholic settings earning numerous awards including the Papal Honor of the Cross, Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice.

With a marriage arranged in heaven to Dr. Rocco Martino, Barbara is blessed with four sons and thirteen grandchildren. Through the Rocco and Barbara Martino Foundation Dr. and Mrs. Martino have sponsored numerous scholarships to various institutions of Catholic education. Barbara is an exceptional model of Catholic faith and charity, personifying the counsel of St. Ignatius of Loyola that, "Love ought to manifest itself more by deeds than by words."

Mr. Tom Thornton
Founder and owner of several JD McGillicudy's Pubs, attended Saint Laurence Elementary School in Upper Darby and Monsignor Bonner High School and continued his education at Saint Joseph's University. Due to financial difficulties, Tom gave up his college experience to go to work to support his elderly parents.

At age twenty, Tom began coaching CYO Sports at Saint Laurence Parish. This was the beginning of a forty-plus year adventure of coaching in CYO Sports which was peppered with additional sports related responsibilities such as his ten year stint as the Assistant Coach of Villanova University's Women's Basketball Team. Recently, Tom was inducted into Monsignor Bonner High School's Hall of Fame.

Tom and his wife Arlene have seven children and fourteen grandchildren. Throughout his life, both on and off the court, he has embodied Catholic Christian values. His dedication and commitment to youth have made him a role model, mentor and positive influence to many.

# # #

Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Hosts 4th Annual Men's Spirituality Conference The Conference Welcomes Archbishop Chaput For The First Time

March 1, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA HOSTS
4th ANNUAL MEN'S SPIRITUALITY CONFERENCE

The Conference Welcomes Archbishop Chaput for the first time

Catholic men from across the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will come together for a day of prayer and fellowship at the Fourth Annual Men's Spirituality Conference. Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., will celebrate the Closing Mass at 2:30 p.m.

Saturday, March 3, 2012
8:15 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. (Conference)
2:30 p.m. (Mass)
Archbishop Ryan High School
11201 Academy Road
Philadelphia, PA 19154


This conference is an opportunity for Catholic men to gather and strengthen one another as they grow in commitment to their faith so that they may more effectively serve their families and the Church.

This year's feature presenters are Rwandan genocide survivor, Immaculée Ilibagiza*, who is an author and motivational speaker, and Tony Melendez**, Nicaraguan composer and musician born without arms who performed concerts for Blessed Pope John Paul II.

Other speakers include: Reverend J. Brian Bransfield, Philadelphia priest and Associate General Secretary of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops; Tim Staples, Director of Apologetics and Evangelization in El Cajon, California; and Deacon Harold Burke-Sivers, President of the Catholic evangelization group, Servant Enterprises.

# # #


Editor's Note: For more information on the Men's Spirituality Conference please visit http://manupphilly.com/.

* Immaculée Ilibagiza will also be speaking on Saturday, March 3, 6:30 p.m., at Saint Mary Magdalen Parish in Media, PA.

**Tony Melendez will host a concert on Sunday, March 4th from 4:00 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at Archbishop Ryan High School.

Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Statement Regarding Reverend Patrick G. Mccormick

March 2, 2012

STATEMENT REGARDING
REVEREND PATRICK G. MCCORMICK

At approximately 5:00 p.m. this evening the Archdiocese of Philadelphia learned that Father Patrick McCormick was arrested on Feburary 23rd and charged with patronizing a prostitute. This information is deeply troubling.

On Friday, Feburary 24th, Father McCormick informed the Archdiocese that he had been arrested the day before, but that the charge was DUI.

Father McCormick has been placed on administrative leave.

###

Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: What's Next For Catholic Schools: The Work Isn't Over

March 5, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
WHAT'S NEXT FOR CATHOLIC SCHOOLS: THE WORK ISN'T OVER

One of the best moments in the recent life of our Church happened on Friday, February 23, as students at West Catholic, Conwell-Egan, Bonner-Prendie and St. Hubert's learned that their high schools, originally slated to close, would remain open.

I made the judgment to keep these financially challenged high schools open just a few hours before the press conference announcing the final decision. That little "miracle" happened because a great many people - from the Blue Ribbon Commission, the Office of Catholic Education, the individual school communities and Philadelphia's business and philanthropic leadership -- worked heroically to make it so. They raised new money and created the seeds of a new education foundation to assist our archdiocesan high schools, and eventually all our archdiocesan schools.

The Blue Ribbon Commission's work, the subsequent appeals process and the effort to save the four high schools placed very heavy demands on everyone involved. We owe a big debt of thanks to Jack Quindlen, Ed Hanway, Eleanor Dezzi, Jerry Davis, Frank Farnesi and other members of Blue Ribbon Commission; to Richard McCarron, Mary Rochford and David Magee of the Office of Catholic Education; and to Brian O'Neill, Brian Tierney and other members of the wider community for stepping forward to help.

I especially want to thank the pastors and people of the archdiocese who supported the Commission report and the findings of the appeals process. Some of them did so at great personal cost. No process is perfect. Some persons are always left unsatisfied. In a financially challenged environment as large and complex as the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, this can't be avoided. But in the end, the process of examining our schools was just. Our schools will grow stronger because of the new ideas and structures we now begin to test.

And that brings me to a two simple but urgent facts we need to remember in the weeks ahead.

First, after every feel-good moment like the high school news on February 23, many of us would like to relax. But that's a luxury we can't afford. Our problems are not yet solved. They're merely delayed. We've been given more time, more talent and more resources to address them, but the problems facing our schools still need a great deal of hard work and creative thinking to be overcome. We need to vigorously increase school enrollments. We need to raise far more money both at the local grassroots and wider business community levels. And we need to stay focused on the effort. If we don't do all of these things, the failure will be ours to own.

Second, without the passage of opportunity scholarships and greater Educational Improvement Tax Credits (EITC), all of our school efforts become much more difficult. In fact, many of our schools will face the same financial crisis again in the future. "School choice" in the form of vouchers (i.e., opportunity scholarships), along with more EITC resources, is essential to the survival and thriving of our schools. That means that parents, pastors, and Catholic school teachers, presidents and principals need to contact their state lawmakers - this week and next week and the week after, no matter how many times it takes. They need to press their legislators to support opportunity scholarships and to increase Educational Improvement Tax Credits.

Catholic education in southeast Pennsylvania has a long and fruitful history. Our schools have played a huge role in enriching the life of Philadelphia and its surrounding communities. Now we need to work to restore that great legacy of education.

If we stay focused, raise the resources we need and fight for the passage of opportunity scholarships and more EITC funds, we'll succeed. If we don't, we'll fail -- and we'll have no one to blame but ourselves. The choice is ours.

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Editor's Note: Columns are published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.htm.

Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

***media Advisory*** Archbishop Chaput Hosts Student Town Hall Meeting New Initiatives To Drive High School Enrollment Announced

March 7, 2012

***MEDIA ADVISORY***

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT HOSTS STUDENT TOWN HALL MEETING
NEW INITIATIVES TO DRIVE HIGH SCHOOL ENROLLMENT ANNOUNCED

Tomorrow, Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., will host an in person and virtual town hall meeting - including Archdiocesan high school and eighth grade students - to announce new marketing initiatives to help drive enrollment. This follows the February 24 announcement that the four high schools slated for closure will in fact stay open.

Since Archdiocesan students and their love for their schools are one of the Archdiocese's best assets in driving enrollment, leaders from each of the 17 Archdiocesan high schools will be on hand to connect directly with the Archbishop and learn how to become an active ambassador for their schools. The town hall format will also allow thousands of Catholic high school and elementary students to tune in to the Archdiocese's website (www.archphila.org) and ask questions via two-way web conferencing.

Archbishop Chaput Student Town Hall
11:00 a.m.
Thursday, March 8, 2012
Archdiocese of Philadelphia Pastoral Center
Auditorium
222 North 17th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103


# # #


Editor's Note: The town hall will be broadcast live via the Archdiocese's website www.archphila.org.

Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Celebrate Annual Mass For Persons With Disabilities

March 7, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO CELEBRATE
ANNUAL MASS FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES

Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will be the celebrant and homilist at the annual Mass for Persons with Disabilities. The liturgy is sponsored by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia Department of Pastoral Care for Persons with Disabilities and the Deaf Apostolate, which recognizes the needs and gifts of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and facilitates their participation in the life of the Church and its faith community.

Saturday, March 10, 2012
10:45 a.m. (Musical Prelude)
11:00 a.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


The Divine Providence Village Bell Choir, composed of women with developmental disabilities, will perform the musical prelude. Two additional choirs will provide the liturgical music: the Saint Lucy Day School for Children with Visual Impairments Singers under the direction of their Principal, Sr. Meg Fleming. I.H.M., as well as the Saint Raymond of Peñafort Choir under the direction of Mr. Kevin Belton.

All are welcome to attend this special celebration, especially families, friends, neighbors, and caregivers of those with disabilities.

A reception will be held immediately following Mass in the Archdiocesan Pastoral Center at 222 North 17th Street, Philadelphia, PA. The Nevilaires Choir, consisting of individuals who are blind, will provide musical entertainment for the reception.

# # #


Editor's Note: For more information please contact the Department of Pastoral Care for Persons with Disabilities at 215-587-3530.

Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia In Partnership With The Faith In The Future Foundation Announces New Initiatives To Drive High School Enrollment

March 8, 2012

THE ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE FAITH IN THE FUTURE FOUNDATION ANNOUNCES NEW INITIATIVES TO DRIVE HIGH SCHOOL ENROLLMENT

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia in partnership with the Faith in the Future Foundation, which was created to support and guide the system of Archdiocesan high schools, announced today new initiatives to drive enrollment. These initiatives include over a million dollars in new grant money, incentive programs for current students, ways for students to share with others their love for their Archdiocesan school, a centralized online registration system and the announcement of a "See Our School" weekend.

1,000 grants of $1,000: The Faith in the Future Foundation recognizes that cost is one of the biggest barriers that families face when choosing a Catholic education and although, the Archdiocese and its supporting organizations provide scholarships and tuition assistance, there is always a need for more. To address this need, the foundation will be providing 1,000 new grants of $1,000 for incoming freshman-a million dollars in new grant money. These grants will allow the Archdiocese to offer students a high-quality education at a cost of $399 per month over 12 months.

I Love My School-You Should Love Yours Too: The foundation recognizes that Archdiocesan students are some of the schools' best proponents, and therefore, it is offering one student at each high school the opportunity to win a $5,000 tuition grant for referring the most new students to register for the 2012-2013 school year. The student, who refers the most new students across all high schools, will win a $25,000 tuition grant. This referral program will only count for new registrations, currently registered incoming freshmen and transfer students will not count as referrals.

Show it! Snap it! Share it!: The recent outpouring of love to the Archdiocesan high schools proved many things. It proved loyalty, determination and a willingness to help. But most of all, it proved that a Catholic education forms a special, life-long bond. It's a bond full of love and pride, which these students carry with them in the classroom, on the playing field, and in the community. The foundation has created a new microsite, www.MyAOPSchool.com that encourages high school students to share their love for their school through photos on Twitter.

"See Our Schools" Weekend: All Archdiocesan high schools will be hosting "See Our Schools" events from Thursday, March 22 through Sunday, March 25 to encourage families to visit their schools to see firsthand their unique benefits. Computer labs and kiosks will be set up to accept online registrations through a new centralized online registration website that is launching on Monday, March 12, www.AOPregister.com.

"When we founded the Faith in the Future Foundation, we knew that stronger marketing and recruitment efforts would need to be a top priority," said Edward Hanway, Chairman of the Faith in the Future Foundation. "These innovative initiatives allow us to address head on the need to increase enrollment by reaching parents where they are, allowing them to easily register their children, removing some of the cost barriers, utilizing our best assets and showcasing the life changing benefits of a Catholic education."

In addition to the initiatives announced today, the foundation is working closely with the Office of Catholic Education and each of the high schools to develop further programs and marketing initiatives, including a paid media campaign to support "See Our Schools" weekend and cultivate ongoing partnerships and unique programs with colleges and others to bolster Philadelphia Archdiocesan High School graduates entering post-secondary education.

"When I announced that West Catholic, Conwell-Egan, Bonner-Prendie and St. Hubert's would remain open, I knew that we needed to vigorously increase school enrollments not just at these schools but all of our high schools" said Archbishop Charles Chaput. "These initiatives put forth by the Faith in the Future Foundation demonstrate that we are on the right path towards sustainable, academically excellent schools that are rooted in faith. However, we must not lose sight of the fact that we all need to do our part to ensure the future of Catholic education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia."

###

Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Where We Are As A Church, Six Months Later

March 8, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
WHERE WE ARE AS A CHURCH, SIX MONTHS LATER

Six months ago this week (March 8), I began my service as Archbishop of Philadelphia. One of the reasons I write this weekly column is to speak directly and freely to our clergy and people. Today is a good time to reflect on the work that's been done so far to resolve the challenges facing the Archdiocese, and the work - a great deal of work - that still remains.

As I've noted in the past, when I arrived in Philadelphia I began a comprehensive financial and legal review of our archdiocesan operations. That process has been thorough and sobering. It will continue for several more months. But today we do have a far better sense of our limited resources and the scope of our problems. I've shared this information in detail with our Priests' Council, our Archdiocesan Finance Council and our newly formed Archdiocesan Pastoral Council, which I'll focus on in my column next week. Going forward, all three of these key advisory bodies will have regular, accurate briefings on the issues we face as a Church.

In the months since last September, we've reorganized our legal representation; hired a new and very capable chief financial officer; developed new internal financial controls; begun the work of improving our business policies, personnel and procedures; brought the Blue Ribbon Commission's important work to conclusion; started a new education foundation; and carried out a difficult -- but necessary and fair -- appeals process for schools slated to regionalize or close.

Since October I've appointed seven new members to our Archdiocesan Review Board to deal with allegations of clergy sexual abuse. All of them have outstanding backgrounds in law enforcement or victim assistance.

I've also had the good fortune of working with several people appointed by Cardinal Rigali in his final months of service who've done great work in addressing the problem of sexual abuse and making the Archdiocese a safe environment. These include victims' advocate Ms. Mary Achilles, who's overseen the training of more than 25,000 archdiocesan clergy, staff and volunteers in identifying and reporting suspected abuse; and Ms. Leslie Davila, formerly with the Philadelphia District Attorney's office, who's reorganized and greatly improved our victim assistance efforts.

They also include Mr. Al Toczydlowski, a former Philadelphia Deputy District Attorney, who works closely with law enforcement, serves as our Delegate for Investigations, and helped develop our current abuse reporting and investigation policies; and Ms. Gina Maisto Smith, also a veteran former Philadelphia prosecutor, who has led an exhaustive review of our abuse-related policies, procedures and cases stemming from the 2011 grand jury report.

A point worth remembering is this: We need to acknowledge our failures of the past in dealing with clergy sexual abuse, and we need to help victims of that abuse to heal. We also need to acknowledge that no entity in the United States today - Catholic or otherwise - seeks more earnestly than the Archdiocese of Philadelphia to prevent abuse and to protect its people. And that commitment will only grow stronger in the years ahead.

I can't conclude this column without noting that one item - a very painful one -- remains a source of great frustration for our priests, our people and for me. More than two dozen of my brother priests who were placed on leave in the wake of last year's grand jury report remain on administrative leave. On several different occasions, our priests have heard that these cases would end "soon." We're now in March 2012, exactly one year later. Justice requires a resolution of these men's circumstances.

Our ability to act on these cases has been limited by a number of stubborn legal and practical factors. But some of these cases are very near conclusion. My hope is that most will be completed and announced over the next eight weeks. A few will likely be delayed because of continuing legal review.

Our attorneys are committed to cooperating fully with law enforcement. In that spirit, I've asked them to inform the court that, unless otherwise prohibited, we intend to begin announcing the resolution of these administrative leave cases in the coming weeks.

What we've achieved in the last six months is small compared to what remains to be done. But it's a start; a beginning made hopeful by the good will and kindness of our priests and our people. I said six months ago that I was proud and grateful to be your bishop. I feel that even more strongly today. So I ask again for your prayers and your support. And as I said last September: You will have from me - now and always -- all of my energy, and my whole heart.

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Editor's Note: Columns are published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.htm.

Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Celebrate Saint Patrick's Day Observance Mass 242nd Annual Saint Patrick's Day Parade In Philadelphia

March 9, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO CELEBRATE
SAINT PATRICK'S DAY OBSERVANCE MASS

242nd Annual Saint Patrick's Day Parade in Philadelphia

Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will be the celebrant and homilist for the Saint Patrick's Day Observance Mass. Additional concelebrants of the Mass include chaplains of the Annual Saint Patrick's Day Parade, Rev. Kevin J. Gallagher and Rev. Christopher M. Walsh.
The Philadelphia Emerald Society Pipe Band will lead a procession from Saint Patrick Parish Rectory to the Church at 9:15 a.m.

Sunday, March 11, 2012
9:15 a.m. (Procession)
9:30 a.m. (Mass)
Saint Patrick Parish
20th and Locust Streets
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Following Mass, the faithful will join marchers in the 242nd Saint Patrick's Day Parade on 16th Street and JFK Boulevard. The parade theme this year is Saint Patrick, Bless the American Worker.

# # #


Editor's Note: For more information about the Saint Patrick Day Observance Association, please visit www.philadelphiastpatsparade.com

Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Statement From The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Regarding Arrest Of Former Financial Officer

March 13, 2012

STATEMENT FROM THE ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA
REGARDING ARREST OF FORMER FINANCIAL OFFICER

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia has worked closely with the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office regarding the embezzlement of funds by Anita Guzzardi, the former chief financial officer of the Archdiocese.

On July 13, 2011, the District Attorney's Office alerted the Archdiocese to certain accounting irregularities reported to the D.A.'s office by a credit card company. Guzzardi was placed on administrative leave the following day. After a preliminary internal forensic financial investigation by the Archdiocese, she was terminated on July 22. Following the initial investigation, the Archdiocese continued the financial investigation and shared all findings with the D.A.'s office in August.

Estimates show that Guzzardi embezzled more than $900,000 from the general operating fund of the Archdiocese. Donations to the Heritage of Faith ~ Vision of Hope capital campaign and the annual Catholic Charities Appeal were not impacted. The theft had no effect on the work of the Blue Ribbon Commission or the decision to close or regionalize any school.

Insurance will cover most of the costs for embezzled funds and a portion of the fees for the internal investigation.

Guzzardi held a number of finance-related positions within the Archdiocese since her hiring in 1989. She was formally appointed to the CFO position on July 1, 2011.

###


Editor's Note: Read Archbishop Chaput's column Putting Our House In Order - On Stewardship, Accountability and the Work that Lies Ahead at http://bit.ly/archbishopfinances

Contact
Kenneth Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Rally For Religious Freedom At Independence Hall Concerned Citizens Will Gather To Voice Opposition To The Hhs Mandate That Violates Conscience Rights

March 13, 2012

RALLY FOR RELIGIOUS FREEDOM AT INDEPENDENCE HALL

Concerned citizens will gather to voice opposition to
the HHS Mandate that violates conscience rights

Philadelphia Catholics and pro-life supporters will gather at a Rally for Religious Freedom to voice their concerns regarding the HHS Mandate which Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has called, "flawed and dangerous."

Friday, March 23, 2012
12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m.
Independence Hall
500 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19106


On January 20th, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reaffirmed a rule that virtually all private health care plans must cover sterilization, abortion-causing drugs, and contraception.

The exemption provided for "religious employers" is so narrow that it failed to cover the vast majority of faith-based organizations-including Catholic hospitals, universities, and charities-that help millions of people every year regardless of their faith. As Archbishop Chaput stated in his February 17th online column, "It's not a 'compromise' and it needs to be rescinded" **.

Important Facts about the HHS Mandate


# The mandate does not exempt Catholic charities, schools, universities, or hospitals.
# The mandate forces these institutions and others, against their conscience, to pay for things they consider immoral.
# The mandate forces coverage of sterilization and abortion-inducing drugs and devices as well as contraception.
# # #

Editor's Note: For more information please contact Mr. Steven Bozza, Director of the Respect Life Office, at (215) 587-5661.
** To read Archbishop Chaput's full column please visit
http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/weeklycolumn6.pdf.

Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocesan High Schools Host "see Our Schools" Events To Engage Prospective Students And Drive Enrollment

March 20, 2012

ARCHDIOCESAN HIGH SCHOOLS HOST "SEE OUR SCHOOLS" EVENTS
TO ENGAGE PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS AND DRIVE ENROLLMENT

Starting Wednesday, March 21 and running through Sunday, March 25, Archdiocesan high schools will host "See Our Schools" events on their campuses. The events provide prospective students and their parents the opportunity to tour the facilities and speak with students, faculty and staff. This is part of the larger efforts of the Faith in the Future Foundation to implement marketing initiatives to showcase the unique learning environment fostered by a Catholic education.


School: Pope John Paul ll High School
Date: Wednesday, March 21, 2012
Time: 6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

School: Saints John Neumann and Maria Goretti High School
Date: Thursday, March 22, 2012
Time: 5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

School: West Philadelphia Catholic High School
Date: Thursday, March 22, 2012
Time: 5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

School: Little Flower Catholic High School
Date: Thursday, March 22, 2012
Time: 6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

School: Bishop Shanahan High School
Date: Thursday, March 22, 2012
Time: 6:30 p.m. - 8 p.m.

School: Saint Hubert's Catholic High School for Girls
Date: Thursday, March 22, 2012
Time: 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

School: Archbishop Wood High School
Date: Thursday, March 22, 2012
Time: 7 p.m. - 9 p.m.

School: Cardinal O'Hara High School
Date: Thursday, March 22, 2012
Time: 7 p.m. - 9 p.m.

School: Lansdale Catholic High School
Date: Friday, March 23, 2012
Time: 6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

School: Archbishop Carroll High School
Date: Saturday, March 24, 2012
Time: 11 a.m. - 1 p.m.

School: Bishop McDevitt High School
Date: Saturday, March 24, 2012
Time: 12 p.m. - 2 p.m.

School: John W. Hallahan Catholic Girls' High School
Date: Saturday, March 24, 2012
Time: 12 p.m. - 2 p.m.

School: Archbishop Ryan High School
Date: Saturday, March 24, 2012
Time: 2 p.m. - 4 p.m.

School: Monsignor Bonner - Archbishop Prendergast High School
Date: Sunday, March 25, 2012
Time: 11:15 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

School: Father Judge High School
Date: Sunday, March 25, 2012
Time: 11:30 a.m. - 2 p.m.

School: Mercy Vocational High School
Date: Sunday, March 25, 2012
Time: 12 p.m. - 2 p.m.

School: Conwell-Egan Catholic High School
Date: Sunday, March 25, 2012
Time: 1 p.m. - 3 p.m.

The Faith in the Future Foundation brings a new vision for Archdiocesan high schools to grow and thrive. The foundation will support and guide the system of Archdiocesan high schools and eventually assist the parish elementary schools, regional schools and schools of special education across the five-county Philadelphia region. The foundation is a private and independent entity focused on creating an innovative, best-in-class and fiscally sustainable Catholic secondary educational system.

# # #

Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: The Nature Of The Church And The Importance Of Lay Action

March 21, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
THE NATURE OF THE CHURCH AND THE IMPORTANCE OF LAY ACTION

In the next few months, at my request, the Catholic Standard and Times will publish a report on the financial condition of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, including its offices, ministry programs and many of its related agencies and non-profit corporations.

Too often we think of the Church as an institution, and institutions are hard to love. The structures of Catholic life are required by canon and civil law, and they're important. But they're also secondary. At her heart, the Church is a family, a community of believers. Like any family, her members have mutual obligations of respect and accountability. This has practical consequences. We ask our people to be generous. As a result, they have a right to know that their resources, which the Church holds in trust for them, are used properly.

To put it another way: We can't be confident about the future; we can't even begin to solve our problems; unless we're well informed. Much of this year's financial information will be new. Some of it will be quite sobering. Nonetheless, beginning this year and every year in the future, we will provide to our people as full a picture of our financial life as a Church as we reasonably can.

Part of my accountability as a bishop involves seeking the advice of skilled, prudent people. In the life of the Church, advisory bodies exist for a purpose. They have a duty to be faithful to the Church and her teachings, but if they simply say what they think the pastor or bishop wants to hear, they fail in their mission. They have a responsibility to offer honest counsel based on their experience and on proper access to good information.

The Archdiocesan Priests' Council (along with the College of Consultors) brings together experienced priests from around our local Church to share in the bishop's decision-making. These men share in the priesthood with their bishop, they lead our local parishes, and they have uniquely important experience of the problems and opportunities in Catholic life at the grassroots level.

Likewise the Archdiocesan Finance Council should gather together the best Catholic professionals in business and finance from the Philadelphia region to help the Church steward her people's resources. Again, the resources of the Church belong to her people, not to the clergy and not to some impersonal monolith. They come from the sweat and sacrifices of generations of Catholics who came before us. The Church holds these resources in trust for the whole Catholic community to carry out the ministries and apostolic works that the Gospel calls all of us to pursue.

The Church requires that every diocese must have a council of priests, a College of Consultors and a finance council. But she also recommends another key advisory body: a diocese-wide pastoral council composed mainly of laypeople and focused on the pastoral issues facing the Catholic community.

Philadelphia's Archdiocesan Pastoral Council (APC) has been planned for some years, with important groundwork done by Dr. Robert Miller of our archdiocesan research staff and Auxiliary Bishop John McIntyre. Last month, on February 25, their work bore fruit in the first ever meeting of the Pastoral Council of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. The meeting began with Mass, and work continued throughout the day. Council sessions included briefings on the legal and financial issues facing the archdiocese; the future of Catholic education in the Philadelphia region; and an overview of our efforts to deal with issues of sexual abuse and to preclude such incidents in the future.

Going forward, APC meetings will occur quarterly. Remaining 2012 dates include May 5, September 8 and December 15. In practice, the council should be a local snapshot of the whole People of God. In Philadelphia, that means it will always include at least one priest, one permanent deacon and one religious. But the rest of the roughly 30 members are laypeople from every walk of life and region in the archdiocese. This makes sense, since the Church is overwhelmingly lay in her membership, and - especially today -- laypeople must play a vital role in advancing the work of the Gospel. I select APC members from candidates nominated by their pastors through the local deaneries. I also reserve a number of at-large appointments to myself to ensure a balance in gender, age, ethnicity and experience.

Service on the council follows four simple rules: fidelity to Catholic teaching; charity; mutual respect; and candor. Members do not "represent" any constituency but themselves. Their great value to the bishop lies in bringing their personal life experience to the honest discussion of pastoral issues facing our Church.

Over the past six months, I've written several times about the hard challenges that lie ahead for our Church. But it won't always be so. To borrow a thought from Francis of Assisi, God has given us too many good people in our archdiocese -- clergy, laypersons and religious -- to fail if we work together to "repair [God's] house."

Things like a financial report and an Archdiocesan Pastoral Council are a beginning. More will come.

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Editor's Note: Columns are published regularly on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.htm.

Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput Forms Pastoral Council Historic Move Signals The Creation Of The First Archdiocesan Pastoral Council In Philadelphia

March 21, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT FORMS PASTORAL COUNCIL
Historic move signals the creation of the first Archdiocesan Pastoral Council in Philadelphia

Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M Cap., recently met with the newly founded Pastoral Council of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. The Pastoral Council is an advisory group to the Archbishop that examines the pastoral activities of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and offers practical counsel to promote the mission of the Church.

While similar councils exist in parishes throughout the Archdiocese, this is the first time that an Archbishop of Philadelphia has established a Pastoral Council for the entire Archdiocese.

Archbishop Chaput said, "The council we now have in place is a local snapshot of the whole People of God, with intelligent, dedicated Catholics from every walk of life. In both of my previous places of ministry as bishop - Rapid City and Denver - the diocesan pastoral council was a vital source of collaboration and help in my work. I look forward to the same good working friendship with council members here in Philadelphia."

The Archdiocesan Pastoral Council consists of Archbishop Chaput and four additional administrators from the Archdiocese who serve in an ex-officio capacity, as well as up to 30 members selected from around the Archdiocese. Some are nominated by particular Deaneries. Others are appointed "at large." The Council currently includes 12 lay women, 11 lay men, one priest, one deacon, and one consecrated religious woman.

In addition to the Archbishop, those serving in an ex-officio capacity include:

Auxiliary Bishop Timothy Senior, Moderator of the Curia; Monsignor Daniel Sullivan, Vicar for Clergy; Mr. Timothy O'Shaughnessy, Chief Financial Officer*; and Mr. Francis X. Maier, Special Assistant and Senior Adviser to the Archbishop.


Members nominated and selected from around the Archdiocese include:

Mr. Edward "Jody" Arena, Ms. Tonya Banks, Saint Cyprian Parish, Philadelphia; Mrs. Bernadette Brooks, Saint Mary Magdalen Parish, Media; Dr. James Callahan, Saint Matthias Parish, Bala Cynwyd; Ms. Sarah Cardie, Saint Francis of Assisi Parish, Springfield; Mr. Dennis Carey, Ms. Dawn Chism, Saint Francis de Sales Parish, Philadelphia; Mr. Bernard Cory, Saint Anselm Parish, Philadelphia; Ms. Laura Endara-Manteilla, Maternity B.V.M. Parish, Philadelphia; Ms. Cynthia Fedele, Mater Dolorosa Parish, Philadelphia; Mr. Jorge Ignacio-Fernández, Our Lady of Guadalupe Parish, Buckingham; Deacon Dennis Friel, Resurrection of Our Lord Parish, Philadelphia; Mrs. Ann Giunta, Saint Agnes Parish, West Chester; Ms. Barbara Inforzato, Saint Thomas Aquinas Parish, Philadelphia; Ms. Marie Joseph, Saint Ignatius of Antioch Parish, Yardley; Ms. Connie McCalla, Saint Raymond Parish, Jenkintown; Sr. Anne Patricia Myers SSJ, Congregational President, Sisters of Saint Joseph; Mr. Rocco Palmo, Our Lady of Mount Carmel Parish, Philadelphia; Mr. Michael Shank, Saints Philip and James Parish, Exton; Ms. Maria Stumpf, Mary, Mother of the Redeemer Parish, North Wales; Monsignor Joseph Trinh, Pastor, Saint Helena Parish, Philadelphia; Mr. Andrew Vu, Saint Helena Parish, Philadelphia; Ms. Mary Beth Walsh, Saint Bernadette Parish, Drexel Hill; Mr. Damian Wargo, Saint Madeleine Sophie Parish, Philadelphia; Mr. Ronald Watson, Saint John the Baptist Parish, Ottsville; and Mr. Michael Yasick, Saint Elizabeth Parish, Upper Uwchlan.

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Editor's Note: The newly formed Archdiocesan Pastoral Council was a topic in Archbishop Chaput's most recent weekly column, which was published today. His columns can be found each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.htm.

*Mr. O'Shaughnessy's appointment as Chief Financial Officer becomes effective April 16, 2012.

Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Announcing Archbishop Charles Chaput's New Ebook "a Heart On Fire" Catholic Faith, Public Witness And Religious Freedom In A Changing Public Square

March 22, 2012

ANNOUNCING ARCHBISHOP CHARLES CHAPUT'S
NEW eBOOK "A HEART ON FIRE"

Catholic faith, public witness and religious freedom in a changing public square

Image Books, a division of Random House publishing, has announced the release of an original new eBook authored by Philadelphia's Archbishop Charles Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. A Heart on Fire: Catholic Witness and the Next America, will be available electronically on March 27, 2012. The eBook - an extended essay on the role of religious faith in American public life today -contrasts current pressures against religious liberty in the United States with the vigorous role this freedom played in founding and forming the nation.

A new and authentically Catholic activism in public affairs is urgent, writes the Archbishop, "as the mistakes and ambiguities of the past half-century of American Catholic experience come to harvest. Our national leadership in 2012 seems deaf to matters of religious freedom abroad and unreceptive -- or frankly hostile -- to religious engagement in public affairs here at home."

A Heart on Fire, initially drafted in the fall of 2011, is even timelier now with the imposition of the current administration's HHS mandate -- an action the Archbishop considers "coercive and deeply troubling in its implications for the rights of conscience." On January 20, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) reaffirmed a rule that virtually all private health care plans must cover sterilization, abortion-causing drugs, and contraception. The exemption provided for "religious employers" is so narrow that it failed to cover the vast majority of faith-based organizations-including Catholic hospitals, universities, and charities-that help millions of people every year regardless of their faith.

Archbishop Chaput is the author previously of Living the Catholic Faith: Rediscovering the Basics (Servant) and Image Books' best-selling Render Unto Caesar, along with numerous articles, reflections, essays and talks. He writes a weekly web column at www.CatholicPhilly.com.

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Editor's Note:
For more information from the publisher contact: Cindy Brovsky, cbrovsky@randomhouse.com
eBook, ISBN: 9780-0-7704-3764-0, 99 Cents.

Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Announcement Regarding The Appointment Of Brother Richard Kestler, F.s.c. As President Of West Philadelphia Catholic High School

March 23, 2012

ANNOUNCEMENT REGARDING THE APPOINTMENT OF
BROTHER RICHARD KESTLER, F.S.C.
AS PRESIDENT OF WEST PHILADELPHIA CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announces with great pleasure the appointment of Brother Richard Kestler, F.S.C., as president of West Philadelphia Catholic High School, effective July 1, 2012. Brother Richard brings with him over 50 years of experience as an educator, administrator and Brother of the Christian Schools. Brother Richard previously served at West Catholic as Principal from 1973-1979 and President from 1999-2005.

According to Auxiliary Bishop Michael Fitzgerald, who oversees Catholic education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, "Brother Richard is a visionary educational leader and administrator. Due to his successful leadership at West Catholic in the past he is revered by the alumni and alumnae, major donors, administrators, faculty and staff. He has a passion and zeal for West that are necessary to take this school into a new and secure future."

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Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Statement From The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Regarding The Resignation Of Mary E. Rochford

March 26, 2012

STATEMENT FROM THE ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA
REGARDING THE RESIGNATION OF MARY E. ROCHFORD

With great reluctance, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia announces that it has accepted the resignation of Mary E. Rochford, Superintendent of Schools. Her decision was made in order to devote time to providing physical care for members of her family unable to do so on their own. Rochford said, "It has been my privilege to serve in the ministry of Catholic education for almost forty years. A long time ago, when I was very young, a wise woman religious told me, 'Remember, you are only a useless servant.' I have kept that in mind and worked as diligently as I could for the sake of the children and now I leave for the sake of my family." The resignation will be effective June 30, 2012.

Mary Rochford has served in the Office of Catholic Education since 1999 and as Superintendent of Schools since 2008. Auxiliary Bishop Michael J. Fitzgerald, who oversees Catholic Education in the Archdiocese said, "Mary is a model leader who always works with joyous, and faith-filled dedication on behalf of the students, faculty, and staff of every school in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. She labors tirelessly to advance the mission of Catholic education and to provide the best possible learning environment for our students, who are the future leaders of our communities. It was with deep sadness that I learned of her decision to resign." Bishop Fitzgerald continued, "Mary has done God's work with excellence and has positively impacted the lives of countless young people. We wish her nothing but the best in her future endeavors."

A product of Catholic education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, Ms. Rochford graduated from the former-Saint Athanasius Parish Elementary School and the former-Cardinal Dougherty High School. She then went on to earn a Bachelor's Degree in Elementary Education from Chestnut Hill College and a Master of Arts Degree in Catholic School Leadership and Administration from Boston College. Prior to joining the Office of Catholic Education in August of 1999, she served as a Catholic school teacher and administrator for over 25 years.

She continued, "I look forward to supporting those who will replace me during this time of transition and am most grateful to Bishop Fitzgerald, the Staff in the Office of Catholic Education, the school administrations, faculties and staffs for their support over the years. It certainly takes a village to support the best educational organization in our country, Catholic schools!"

The Office of Catholic Education will begin a search for a new Superintendent of Schools.

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Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Day Of Prayer And Fasting For Religious Freedom Catholics Throughout The Archdiocese And The Commonwealth Of Pennsylvania To Offer Their Lenten Sacrifice This Friday For The Cause Of Religious Freedom

March 29, 2012


DAY OF PRAYER AND FASTING FOR RELIGIOUS FREEDOM
Catholics throughout the Archdiocese and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania to offer their Lenten sacrifice this Friday for the cause of religious freedom

Catholics from parishes throughout the five-county Archdiocese of Philadelphia will join in spiritual union with their brothers and sisters throughout the state to preserve their religious liberty tomorrow.

In a letter issued earlier this month through the Pennsylvania Catholic Conference (PCC), all of the Catholic bishops of Pennsylvania called on the faithful throughout the Commonwealth to offer a Lenten sacrifice of prayer and fasting on Friday, March 30th for the cause of religious freedom.

Their request was in response to what Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., Archbishop of Philadelphia and Chairman of the PCC, has called "flawed and dangerous" legislation in the form of the current HHS mandates that severely restrict religious freedom.

Catholics believe that prayer and fasting draw individuals closer to the Lord, inspire them to do God's will, and provides an answer to their petitions. In calling for March 30th as a Day of Prayer and Fasting the bishops of Pennsylvania said, "Offer your sacrifice for the cause of religious liberty, that the Church may be granted the basic right to practice what she preaches, and for our political leaders that their eyes may be opened to the rights of all Americans, including those of faith."

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Editor's Note: For a copy of the letter from the bishops of Pennsylvania as well as other resources please visit http://archphila.org/HHS/hhs.htm.

Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Holy Week And Easter Masses At The Cathedral Basilica Of Saints Peter And Paul Palm Sunday Through Easter Sunday April 1, 2012 - April 8, 2012

March 30, 2012

HOLY WEEK AND EASTER MASSES AT
THE CATHEDRAL BASILICA OF SAINTS PETER AND PAUL

Palm Sunday through Easter Sunday
April 1, 2012 - April 8, 2012

PALM SUNDAY OF THE PASSION OF THE LORD - April 1st, 11:00 a.m. and 6:30 p.m.
Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.
will be the principal celebrant and homilist.
Palm Sunday commemorates Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem and the Proclamation of the Passion. It marks the beginning of Holy Week.

HOLY THURSDAY CHRISM MASS - April 5th, 9:40 a.m. (Procession) 10:00 a.m. (Mass)
Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.
will be the principal celebrant and homilist. All Archdiocesan priests gather to concelebrate with the Archbishop and to renew their priestly promises. During this Mass, Archbishop Chaput will bless the Oil of Catechumens and the Oil of the Sick, and consecrate the Oil of Chrism. These holy oils are used throughout the Archdiocese during the coming year in the celebration of the Sacraments. (mult-box feed available)

For those who cannot attend the Chrism Mass, the Mass will be streamed live at www.archphila.org and broadcast on The Catholic Channel on Sirius XM, and Holy Spirit Radio 1420 AM and 1570 AM.

HOLY THURSDAY MASS OF THE LORD'S SUPPER - April 5th, 5:00 p.m.
Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.
will be the principal celebrant. Father Dennis Gill, Director of the Office for Divine Worship, will be the homilist. This Mass commemorates the Last Supper, during which Christ instituted the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist, the Sacrament of Holy Orders, and gave us His commandment to love one another. After the homily, following the example of Christ who washed the feet of the apostles at the Last Supper, the Archbishop will wash the feet of seminarians from Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary.

GOOD FRIDAY PASSION OF THE LORD - April 6th, 3:00 p.m.
Bishop Joseph Martino will be the principal celebrant and homilist at the Solemn Liturgy of the Lord's Passion, commemorating the Holy Passion and Death of Jesus Christ. The traditional adoration of the cross, led by Archbishop Chaput, will take place during the Liturgy. There will be three hours of prayer in the Cathedral from 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. during which Confession will be heard. (no mult-box feed available)

EASTER VIGIL - April 7th, 8:00 p.m.
Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.
will be the principal celebrant and homilist at the Easter Vigil Mass celebrating the Resurrection of the Lord. Four components makeup the Easter Vigil: Service of Light (Blessing of the Fire and Lighting of the Paschal Candle), Liturgy of the Word, Liturgy of Baptism, and the Liturgy of Eucharist.

After a reflective and intense period of prayer during Lent, Catechumens (those who have not been baptized) and Candidates (those who have been baptized in other faiths) will become full members of the Catholic Church at the Cathedral and parishes throughout the Archdiocese at the Easter Vigil and during Easter Time. In 2012, close to 800 new Catholics will be welcomed into the Church. (no mult-box feed available)

EASTER SUNDAY MASS - April 8th, 6:30 p.m.
Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.
will be the celebrant and homilist at the Mass of the Resurrection of the Lord. Other Masses on Easter Sunday are: 8:00 a.m., 9:30 a.m., 11:00 a.m., and 12:30 p.m. (no mult-box feed available)


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Editor's Note: There will be a mult-box feed provided for the Chrism Mass and the Mass of the Last Supper. Crews will need a bnc connector and recording deck or a live truck. Broadcast Media outlets will have parking space in the Archdiocesan Pastoral Center parking lot. The parking lot entrance is located on 17th Street.

Reporters and still photographers will be permitted in the Cathedral but are asked to remain in the designated area for the media (by the side pillars). All media (including still photographers and video cameras) are asked to remain clear of the center aisles at all times.

For Masses that do not have a mult-box feed, video and still cameras are permitted in the Cathedral with the above restrictions.

Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Holy Week, Easter, And The Beginning Of New Life

April 4, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
HOLY WEEK, EASTER, AND THE BEGINNING OF NEW LIFE

The late and much loved Cardinal Augustin Mayer, O.S.B., once wrote that, "Nothing great is ever achieved without suffering."

His words come back to me every year during Holy Week.

They remind us that discipleship always has a cost. No Christian ever lives the Gospel without eventually encountering the cross.

During the Triduum-Holy Thursday, Good Friday and Holy Saturday-the Church invites us to remember that sin is real and that only blood can redeem it . . . but also that God loves us so deeply that he sent his only son to offer himself for our deliverance.

In giving his life for us, Jesus asks us to live our lives for others. He asks us to share in his work of redemption. That's why the Gospel is never merely a call to be "nice" to others. There's nothing sweet about Golgotha. Life in Jesus Christ is a call to heroic and self-sacrificing love. If we want to rise with Jesus on Easter, we also have to share his work of salvation on Good Friday.

C.S. Lewis captured this basic Christian understanding very clearly when he wrote that, "Christianity is a thing of unspeakable joy. But it begins not in joy, but in wretchedness, and it does no good to try to get to the joy by bypassing the wretchedness."

Of course, the nature of "everyday America" in 2012 is that we all live our lives in routines -- routines that tend to dull us into self-absorption at work, at play, in our families, and also in our religious faith. Even the broken body of Christ on the cross can become a standard piety, an object of devotion that doesn't really touch our hearts.

That's why these days of Holy Week are so vital. Holy Week is the most sacred time of the year. It's a time to wake up from our routines and shake off the distractions of daily life-and to concentrate on the One in whom we anchor our hope.

This year, listen to the word of God with new ears. Make some personal room for silence this week. Read and pray over the Gospel accounts of the crucifixion. Venerate the cross.
Remember the price paid for your redemption. Understand how zealously God loves you and when you do, you'll begin to understand the meaning of the Gospel and the urgency of your own vocation to bring the fruit of God's love -- new life in Jesus Christ -- to others.

Good Friday is an end: an end to death; an end to our old selves and our old selfishness. Easter Sunday is a beginning, the beginning of a new and "unspeakable joy" for each of us and all of us. The sorrow of Holy Week is the doorway to something infinitely more beautiful.

So may God grant you and your family, and all of us, a blessed Holy Week-and a holy and joy-filled Easter!

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Editor's Note: Columns are published regularly on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.htm.

Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Homily: 2012 Holy Thursday Chrism Mass

April 5, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S HOMILY:
2012 HOLY THURSDAY CHRISM MASS

When the prophet Isaiah spoke to the Jewish people in this morning's first reading and said, "You yourselves shall be named priests of the Lord, ministers of our God shall you be called," he was not only addressing the descendants of Aaron, the priests of the Old Testament. He was speaking to all of God's people.

So when the Church proclaims this same Word of God in today's liturgy, God, through those words, is speaking to each one of us. "You yourselves shall be named priests of the Lord, ministers of our God shall you be called." Because of our baptism and our confirmation, we all share in the royal priesthood of Jesus Christ. In these sacraments we are all anointed, that is, "marked" with the sacred oils, which means that we are all set aside, "consecrated" and "dedicated" for the work of God.

In a unique way, priests and bishops are set aside within the believing community when hands are laid upon them, and they are anointed with the sacred chrism at their ordinations. As we acknowledge these distinctions within the Church, the sacred oil is a sign of the sacramental unity of the clergy and lay faithful in the person of the Anointed One, Jesus, the Christ.

Every Chrism Mass has two important moments. First, we bless the holy oils and the chrism used throughout the coming year in our local Church. This takes place during Holy Week to remind us that all sacraments draw their power from Christ's death and resurrection.

The second key moment in the Chrism Mass takes place when we who are priests renew our commitment to priestly service. Some years that commitment is easier than others. This past year has been a difficult time for the whole Church in Philadelphia, but it has been a uniquely painful Way of the Cross for every priest. Because of that, I'd like to address the heart of my homily to my brother priests and bishops. I'm sure our people here this morning will understand, and I welcome all of you to please listen in.

Brothers, God sometimes blesses us with special moments of insight into his will and into ourselves. This is especially true when the Lord calls us to conversion. Conversion and renewal are important for every Christian. But they're crucial for us as priests and bishops, because our vocation calls us to be the spark of God's love in the hearts of his people. If priests and bishops don't change, very little in the life of the Church can change.

A few weeks ago, I visited Yeshiva University in New York for a dialogue between Jewish scholars and a group of Catholic bishops. Yeshiva is an Orthodox Jewish university that includes a focus on the study of traditional Jewish religious texts -- mainly the Torah and the Talmud. The study is done through daily lectures. But it's combined with a unique way of immersing oneself in the Word of God called "chavrutas," the Aramaic word for "friendship" or "companionship."

In the chavruta style of learning the young men sit together in groups of two and debate and challenge one another to a deeper understanding of the Scriptures. They're guided by senior rabbinical scholars, but the scholars themselves -- as they walk around the study hall -- become part of the learning dialogue and expand their own understanding of the sacred text.

I came away from my time at Yeshiva with three main impressions.

What struck me first was the passion the students had for the Torah. They didn't merely study it; they consumed it. Or maybe it would be better to say that God's Word consumed them. When a man and woman fall in love, a kind of electricity runs not just between them, but also in the air around them. The story of every true encounter with God is the same. Scripture is a romance. It's the story of God's love for humanity. When we give our hearts entirely to seeking God in the richness of God's Word, we begin to discover and experience that same kind of electricity. I saw it in the students at Yeshiva.

The second thing I noticed was the power of Scripture to create new life. God's Word is a living dialogue between God and humanity. That divine dialogue mirrored itself in the "learning dialogue" among the Yeshiva students. The students began as strangers, but their work in reflecting on Scripture and in sharing what they discovered with each other, then created something more than themselves -- a friendship between themselves and with God.

Third and finally, I saw in the lives of those Jewish students the incredible durability of God's promises and God's Word. Despite centuries of persecution, exile, dispersion and even apostasy, the Jewish people continue to exist because their covenant with God is alive and permanent. God's Word is the organizing principle of their identity. It's the foundation and glue of their relationship with one another, with their past and with their future. And the more faithful they are to God's Word, the more certain they can be of their survival.

My point is this: What I saw at Yeshiva should apply to all of us as priests and bishops, and all of our seminarians who will one day join us in the work. The source of our brotherhood, the seal of our friendship, is the person of Jesus Christ -- alive in God's Word, and alive in the Eucharist we celebrate today and throughout the year.

In the Gospel of Matthew, Jesus told the crowds that the rabbis "have taken their seat on the chair of Moses. Therefore, do and observe all things whatsoever they tell you." In our Catholic tradition we see that same rabbinical role as the duty and responsibility of priests. In our communities God has charged us with taking our seat on the chair of Moses. We need to do everything we can to purify ourselves of vanity and fear and fatigue and resentment, and to make ourselves worthy of that responsibility. Our own souls, and the souls of our people, will depend on the fire that should burn in our hearts -- a fire of love for Jesus Christ, for the Church as our mother, and for the people that God places in our care.

God's Word never weakens. His promises never disappear. At ordination, God called each of us to a special relationship of friendship with himself and of service to his people. This is the only real privilege of our priesthood. It's the only one we should seek; and the only one we need for a life of fruitfulness and joy.

The Yeshiva "chavruta" learning dialogue provides a reminder of our responsibility to be friends and companions of one another as we minister together. We cannot fully understand the richness of God's word nor bear the burden of ministry alone. To be a "companion" means to "share bread" with another. The Eucharist is the source of our fraternal strength.

When we leave here today I pray that we recommit ourselves to trusting in the durability of God's Word; to renewing our passion for Scripture; to loving one another and to following the witness of zeal I saw so powerfully in the students at Yeshiva University -- the same zeal I know lives in each one of you as my brothers. This long Lent is ending. Easter is upon us, and God makes all things new. We need to draw strength from the faith and courage of each other. We need to give ourselves to God without holding anything back, so that through us, God will create a new life for our local Church, for our people and for ourselves.

The writer Francois Mauriac once said that "anyone who has truly known God can never be cured of him." I think that sums up the life of every good priest I've ever known. Each of us began our priesthood as a romance with the God of Israel and the God of Jesus Christ. That thirst for an encounter with the living God; that hunger for the Word of God to consume and reshape our lives with the same electricity so evident in the halls of Yeshiva University -- those yearnings still burn in each of us.

In today's Gospel, Jesus tells the people of Nazareth that the Word of God found in the prophet Isaiah "is today fulfilled in your hearing." More than any other passage in Scripture, these words are the center of human history; the pivot on which all of creation turns. Jesus is the Alpha and the Omega of this world and all worlds, and we need to reclaim him as the Alpha and Omega of our personal lives and of our ministry. He loves us; he has freed us from our sins by his blood; and he has truly made the Church into his Kingdom.

There's a line from the Gospel of Luke that I return to again and again in my life as a priest. And while it doesn't come from today's readings, I ask each of us to pray over it in the days and weeks ahead because it speaks to the kind of men we need to be. Jesus said, "I came to cast fire upon the earth, and would that it were already kindled." The fire Christ meant is the fire of God's love -- the fire of zeal and courage and hope that converts hearts and transforms the world. We need to reclaim the mission God intended for all of us as priests. We begin the future today. So may God grant us the passion to burn up every atom, every trace, every memory of ourselves in a fire of service to God's will and to God's people.

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Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Announces The Appointment Of New Review Board Members

April 10, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA ANNOUNCES THE APPOINTMENT OF NEW REVIEW BOARD MEMBERS

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia has announced the appointment of three new members to serve on the Archdiocesan Review Board, the consultative panel that advises the Archbishop of Philadelphia throughout the process of addressing allegations of sexual abuse of minors, evaluating clerics' suitability for ministry, and the continual review of Archdiocesan policies and procedures related to these matters.

"With their strong leadership skills and unique professional backgrounds, these newly appointed individuals will greatly assist and further guide the Archdiocesan Review Board through these critical review processes," said Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. "I am thankful to all those serving on the Archdiocesan Review Board and am pleased to have such a dedicated and talented group of people, each of whom brings the highest level of expertise, long-standing dedication and passion, working with us through this process."

The Archdiocesan Review Board was established in accord with the Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People and the Essential Norms, and is comprised of psychologists, social workers, educators, retired law enforcement agents, health care professionals, parents and pastors. This group functions as a confidential, advisory committee to the Archbishop, providing recommendations in the assessment of allegations of abuse and suitability for ministry. Through careful analysis of reports, the Board works to ensure that individuals who may have been harmed are given necessary care and that no one with a substantiated allegation of sexual abuse will serve as a member of active ministry. All allegations of abuse heard by the Review Board, whether historical or current, are reported to law enforcement by the Delegate for Investigations.

The new appointees, for whom additional biographical information is available in the attached document, include:

-Robert L. Sadoff, Clinical Professor of Forensic Psychiatry and Director of the Forensic Psychiatry Fellowship Program at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

-Bebe Kivitz, former prosecutor and former Chief of the Child Abuse Unit in the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office and currently an attorney in private practice. Member of the Board of Directors of the Philadelphia Children's Alliance.

-Stacey Ginesin, current member, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Sexual Offender Assessment Board. Formerly the Program Director of TAP program, an outpatient sex offender treatment program in Philadelphia.

The Archdiocesan Review Board now consists of twelve total members, each of whom is appointed to serve a four-year or five-year term, which is renewable. The remaining members include Ana Maria Catanzaro (Associate Professor and Chair of Graduate Nursing Programs, Holy Family University), Reverend Monsignor Thomas Owens (Pastor, Saint Alphonsus Parish), Anne Shenberger (Executive Director of Court Appointed Special Advocates/Youth Advocates, Inc.), Michael Boyle (Program Director at Philadelphia Sexual Assault Response Center), Arnold Gordon (retired prosecutor who served as First Assistant District Attorney), Janet Shaw Lemoine (former victim advocate who most recently served as Director of the Victim/Witness Training and Networking Project), Richmond Parsons (Deputy Chief of Offender Services in the Montgomery County Adult Probation and Parole Department), Laura Rogers (former prosecutor), and Robert Spinelli (former prosecutor and now Partner at the law firm Kelley, Jasons, McGowan, Spinelli, Hanna, & Reber, LLP).

ARCHDIOCESAN REVIEW BOARD MEMBERS
as of April 2012


Michael Boyle
Michael Boyle currently serves as the first Program Director at the Philadelphia Sexual Assault Response Center, which was established to provide assistance to sexual assault victims in need of independent, victim-centered evidence recovery efforts. A 30-year veteran of the Philadelphia Police Department, Boyle attained the rank of Lieutenant and served for fourteen years as the Commanding Officer in the Child Abuse Unit, where he was responsible for administrative oversight of a collaborative investigative process that included child welfare authorities, medical professionals and forensic interviewers working on approximately 1,700 reported cases of child abuse or neglect each year.

Ana Maria Catanzaro
Ana Maria Catanzaro teaches and is Chair of the graduate nursing programs in the School of Nursing and Allied Health Professions at Holy Family University. Dr. Catanzaro has been a registered nurse for thirty-three years and formerly served children in the School District of Philadelphia as a school nurse and compliance officer designee for protected handicapped students. Dr. Catanzaro's educational background is in public health nursing, clinical research, and moral theology. In addition to serving on the Archdiocese of Philadelphia's Review Board, she also serves on the National Review Board of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Arnold Gordon
A prosecutor with 40 years of experience in the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office and the U.S. Department of Justice, Arnold Gordon most recently served as First Assistant District Attorney in Philadelphia. He previously served as Chief of the D.A.'s Homicide, Felony Waiver, and Municipal Court Units. As a Special Attorney in the Justice Department's Organized Crime section, Gordon played a major role in the investigation and subsequent conviction in one of the most significant racketeering cases in U.S. history.

Janet Shaw Lemoine
A member of the Pennsylvania Bar, Janet Shaw Lemoine is a former victim advocate and trainer with 16 years of experience in Philadelphia and across the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Most recently, she served as the Director of the Victim/Witness Training and Networking Project funded through the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency and administered by the Pennsylvania District Attorneys Association. Her responsibilities included training, trouble-shooting and networking statewide with both system-based victim/witness coordinators as well as community based agencies. She previously served as Director of Northwest Victim Services, the first community based comprehensive victim service agency in Philadelphia. Prior to her work with victims, Ms. Lemoine served as a Secondary School teacher with the Philadelphia School District. She has a Master's Degree from Villanova University and a law degree from the Delaware Law School of Widener University.

Reverend Monsignor Thomas Owens
A native Philadelphian who grew up in Our Lady of Lourdes Parish, Monsignor Thomas Owens serves as Pastor of Saint Alphonsus Parish in Maple Glen, Montgomery County. Before arriving at Saint Alphonsus, Monsignor Owens served as the Dean of Formation at Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary.

Richmond Parsons
A nationally recognized trainer with more than twenty years of experience in law enforcement, probation and parole, Richmond Parsons currently serves as Deputy Chief of Offender Services in the Montgomery County Adult Probation and Parole Department. He has conducted trainings for local, state and national probation and parole agencies on topics such as computer search and seizure, sex offender management and leadership. He currently serves as the Chairman of the Montgomery County Sex Offender Task Force and works with the Montgomery County Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force. He is also a member of the Governor's Advisory Committee on Probation and Secretary of the Mid-Atlantic chapter of the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers.

Laura Rogers
Laura Rogers served as the Director of the Center for Litigation Training and Community Practice Management and the Deputy Director of the Criminal Law Division of the Navy's Office of the Judge Advocate General, where she served as the Navy's expert on military justice issues. She also acted as legal advisor on the operations of the Sexual Assault Prevention Training Program. In 2006, she was appointed by President George W. Bush as the Founding Director of the Department of Justice's Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering and Tracking (SMART) office, where she was responsible for the implementation of the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006, the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act. Prior to her work with the federal government, Rogers founded and served as Director of the National Institute for Training Child Abuse Professionals, where she trained prosecutors, medical and law enforcement professionals, forensic interviewers, therapists and protective service workers on a range of topics related to child sexual and physical abuse. She is a former prosecutor from San Diego County where she specialized in child homicide and child sexual molestation prosecutions.
Anne Shenberger
Anne Shenberger is Executive Director of Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA)/Youth Advocates Inc. She served for over twenty years as the Southeast Regional Director of Pennsylvania's Office of Children, Youth and Families. In that role, she was responsible for the investigation of allegations of child abuse in foster and adoptive homes, group homes, residential facilities and day care centers. She has a Master's Degree in social work from Bryn Mawr College and is a licensed social worker in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. In addition to the Archdiocese Review Board, she serves on the Board of Directors of several other nonprofit agencies in the Philadelphia area.

Robert Spinelli
A former prosecutor with the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office, Mr. Spinelli is now a partner at the law firm Kelley Jasons McGowan Spinelli Hanna & Reber. Mr. Spinelli specializes in representing companies involved in mass tort litigation. He has extensive experience in overall claims management for companies involved in hundreds of thousands of claims nationwide. In addition to organizing and participating in numerous legal seminars on mass tort litigation all across the country, Mr. Spinelli has lectured on medico-legal issues at the Thomas Jefferson University School of Medicine and Temple University.

Robert L. Sadoff
Dr. Robert Sadoff is currently Clinical Professor of Forensic Psychiatry and Director of the Forensic Psychiatry Fellowship Program at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, where he has taught since 1972. He is the author of over 100 articles and 10 books on issues in forensic psychiatry. He has examined over 10,000 individuals charged with crimes during the past 50 years and has testified for both prosecution and defense in over 20 states and several federal jurisdictions. He is the recipient of numerous national and international awards and has lectured in almost every state and in 12 countries of the world.

Bebe Kivitz
Bebe Kivitz is a former prosecutor and former Chief of the Child Abuse Unit in the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office. Ms. Kivitz also has extensive experience in private practice where she has handled a broad range of litigation matters including civil rights, medical malpractice, toxic tort, corporate investigations, internal disciplinary proceedings, personal injury, employment, and commercial disputes. She specializes in abuse litigation and continues to represent assault victims. Ms. Kivitz has served on the Board of Directors of Philadelphia Children's Alliance since 2000, a non-profit organization which collaborates with law enforcement, child welfare, and medical professionals, and conducts state of the art forensic interviews of child abuse victims. She is also a member of Brandeis Law Society, and has served on its Executive Committee since 2010.

Stacey Ginesin
Stacey Ginesin is a clinical psychologist with nearly 15 years of experience working with sexual offenders in Atlanta, San Francisco and Philadelphia in research, outpatient, and prison settings. She was instrumental in the development of the TAP program, an outpatient sex offender treatment program in Philadelphia and served as the program director until 2010. In that capacity Dr. Ginesin provided treatment, conducted evaluations and risk assessments, and supervised other clinicians. She has worked closely with the court systems in Philadelphia and the surrounding counties. In addition to her work with offenders, Dr. Ginesin has worked with sexual abuse victims and their families. She has been a member of the Pennsylvania Sexual Offender Assessment Board since 2008 and is the Eastern Pennsylvania area representative for the Mid-Atlantic chapter of the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers.

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Editor's Note: For continuing updates and additional background information on the Archdiocese of Philadelphia's commitment to child protection, victim assistance and priestly integrity, please visit www.archphila.org.

Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Catholic School Students For Catholic Charities To Host Collection Celebration

April 11, 2012

CATHOLIC SCHOOL STUDENTS FOR CATHOLIC CHARITIES
TO HOST COLLECTION CELEBRATION

Catholic School Students for Catholic Charities will host their collection celebration with
Auxiliary Bishop Michael J. Fitzgerald. With help from the Archbishop Carroll Cheerleaders, Band, Step Team and the school Choir, more than 150 students from schools throughout the Archdiocese will celebrate their hard work raising funds that will benefit Catholic Special Education.

Thursday, April 19, 2012
11:00 a.m.
Archbishop Carroll High School
211 Matson Ford Road
Radnor, PA 19087-4590


The goal of Catholic School Students for Catholic Charities is to connect and educate students with the works of the Archdiocese, emphasizing the relationship between charity and the Catholic faith.

The money raised by Catholic School Students for Catholic Charities will support the schools of Special Education in the Archdiocese: Archbishop Ryan Academy for the Deaf, Saint Lucy Day School for Children with Visual Impairments, Saint Katherine Day School and Our Lady of Confidence Day School. Students began raising money at the start of Advent and concluded during the season of Lent. They came up with creative ways to get donations such as karaoke nights, basketball shoot-offs and arts and crafts sales.

The one elementary school and the one high school from each of the five counties in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia who raised the most money will be recognized. Student leaders from each of these schools will be invited to an awards ceremony and breakfast with Auxiliary Bishop Timothy C. Senior on May 3, 2012 at the Archdiocesan Pastoral Center. Students will also be given a "backstage tour" of the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul.

The 2012 Catholic Charities Appeal officially kicked-off in February and is the single largest fundraising initiative in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. This year's goal is $10 million. Funds from the Appeal assist many programs administered by the Archdiocese, including housing and meals for the homeless, senior and family service centers, afterschool programs, community food cupboards and residential and community-based academic programs for dependent and delinquent youth, developmentally disabled and special needs children.

For more information about the Catholic Charities Appeal, please visit www.catholiccharitiesappeal.org.

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Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Catholic Social Services Awarded The 21st Century Community Learning Center Grant

April 11, 2012

CATHOLIC SOCIAL SERVICES AWARDED
THE 21ST CENTURY COMMUNITY LEARNING CENTER GRANT

Catholic Social Services (CSS) of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia has been awarded the 21st Century Community Learning Center Grant by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. The $1.5 million dollar grant, will be used to enhance and broaden current CSS afterschool and summer programs over a three year period.

"This was a very competitive selection process, and we are honored to have been chosen to receive this generous grant," said Director of Community-Based Prevention Services Division of CSS, Amy Stoner. "As 21st Century Community Learning Centers, we now have the technology and resources to align our Out Of School Time Programs with the academic learning that is taking place in the classroom during the school day, as well as follow the PA Core Standards for Education. This is a wonderful opportunity for us to work closely with the schools and the Office of Catholic Education, in evaluating the positive impact after school programs have on academic achievement."

Catholic Social Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia operates 12 Out of School Time (OST) Programs in the City of Philadelphia, serving more than 2,200 children in grades K-12th annually. These programs are located at Catholic grade schools, CSS Family Service Centers, and the Cardinal Bevilacqua Community Center. Located in neighborhoods with high poverty and crime rates, these programs provide a safe haven for children to access high quality programs.

The Out of School Time Programs is a catalyst in the lives of youth to combat challenges and to promote academic and social success in the areas of reading, writing, math, school attendance, and post-secondary and career exploration. This is achieved by providing students with an array of accessible, enriching and academically focused programs. Funds from the 21st Century Community Learning Center Grant will support in part; academic enrichment programs including, Science Technology Engineering and Math (STEM) activities, arts and music, and the expansion of the existing Out of School Time programs.


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Editor's Note: For more information on Catholic Social Services and its Out of School Time Programs please visit http://www.cssoutofschooltime.org

Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Some Thoughts On 'our First, Most Cherished Liberty'

April 11, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
SOME THOUGHTS ON 'OUR FIRST, MOST CHERISHED LIBERTY'

On Thursday, April 12, America's bishops issued one of their most important statements in years. Our First, Most Cherished Liberty is not just a compelling defense of religious freedom. It's also a call to action no committed Catholic can afford to ignore.

First, a little history and some background:

In the vision of America's Founders, God exists, and his sovereignty matters. God endows each person with freedom and rights so that we can fulfill our duties toward him and each other. Our rights come from God, not from the state. Government is justified only insofar as it secures, promotes and defends those natural rights.

As James Madison said in his 1785 "Memorial and Remonstrance against Religious Assessments":

"[Man's duty of honoring God] is precedent both in order of time and degree of obligation to the claims of civil society. Before any man can be considered as a member of civil society, he must be considered as a subject of the Governor of the universe."

This is why religious liberty is our most important freedom. Our first governor is God, our Creator, the Governor of the universe. We're created for a higher purpose. We have a religious destiny. Our right to pursue this destiny precedes the state. Any attempt to suppress our right to worship, preach, teach, practice, organize and peacefully engage society because of our belief in God is an attack not only on the cornerstone of human dignity, but also on the nature of the American experiment.

To put it another way, in the American model, religion is more than a private affair between the individual believer and God. Religion is essential to the virtues needed for a free people.

America's Founders expected religious groups to contribute actively to the nation's social fabric. For all their many differences, the Founders agreed that a free people cannot remain free and self-governing without religious faith and the virtues that it fosters. John Adams' famous words to the Massachusetts militia in 1789 were typical: "Our constitution was made only for a moral and religious people. It is wholly inadequate to the government of any other."

Moreover, when the Founders talked about religion, they meant something much more demanding and vigorous than a vague "spirituality." One of the great legal scholars of the last century, Harold Berman, showed that the Founders understood religion in a frankly Christian-informed sense. For the Founders, religion meant "both belief in God and belief in an after-life of reward for virtue, and punishment for sin." In other words, religion mattered - personally and socially. It was more than a private preference. It made people live differently. People's faith was assumed to have broad implications, including the political kind.

As a result, from the start, believers - alone and in communities - have shaped American history simply by trying to live their faith in the world. The American experience of personal freedom and civil peace would be inconceivable without a religious grounding and a predominantly Christian inspiration. The reason is simple. What we believe about God shapes what we believe about man. And what we believe about man shapes what we believe about the purpose and proper structure of human society. So it should surprise no one that at the heart of American life is a Christian-informed definition of what it means to be human.

That richly developed idea of what it means to be "human," and even the nature of religious freedom itself, now face heavy attacks in our courts, our mass media and our legislatures.

As Our First, Most Cherished Liberty shows, the current HHS healthcare mandate fight - which threatens the mission of many Catholic employers and organizations by forcing them to violate the teachings of their Church - is not an isolated assault. It's part of a growing pattern. The bishops list at least six other high-profile, recent cases where government has aggressively interfered with the rights of religious communities and believers. And these violations are happening right here, in our own country, right now.

I encourage Catholics throughout the archdiocese to download the bishops' statement from the link provided below. It's an outstanding and urgently needed resource. Read it. Pray over it. Then share it with others. Most importantly, the statement calls for a "Fortnight for Freedom" in dioceses across the United States from June 21 through July 4. In the days and weeks ahead, please check our archdiocesan website for our local efforts to observe this important event.

Philadelphia is the birthplace of American independence. It's the cradle of our rights as a free people. There's no better place to begin the renewal of our nation's first and most important freedom: religious liberty.

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Editor's Note: For the full text of Our First, Most Cherished Liberty please visit
http://tinyurl.com/USCCBCherishedLiberty.

Archbishop Chaput's columns are published regularly on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.htm.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Announces Initial Round Of Parish Mergers Resulting From Pastoral Planning Initiative

April 15, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE ANNOUNCES INITIAL ROUND OF PARISH MERGERS RESULTING FROM PASTORAL PLANNING INITIATIVE


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced today that Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has approved the recommendations of the Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee to merge several parishes across the Archdiocese in Coatesville, Germantown, and Manayunk. This ongoing restructuring will ultimately strengthen parish communities positioning them for future growth and sustainability.

"Restructuring our parishes will be a challenge for many families and individuals. Change is rarely easy. But we do need to take these steps to help every parish more effectively promote the Gospel and strengthen the future of our Catholic life together," said Archbishop Chaput.

The recommendations and resulting mergers are an outcome of the Archdiocesan-wide Parish Pastoral Planning Area initiative, which began in 2011. Parishioners at all affected parishes learned of the final decisions through letters mailed to all registered parishioners as well as announcements made at all Masses this past weekend. It is hoped that the planning and restructuring process will result in revitalized parishes throughout the Archdiocese that are better equipped to meet the spiritual and pastoral needs of future generations.

The mergers announced today were based on a combination of factors, including, but not limited to, demographic shifts in Catholic populations, concentrated density of parishes in a limited geographic area, history of declining Mass attendance and sacramental activity, increasing economic challenges that threaten sustainability, a decrease in the availability of clergy to staff parishes, and a review of facilities.

Parishioners will attend daily and Sunday Mass at the church of the newly formed parish. In some cases, the churches of the former parishes will remain open and be maintained as worship sites. At the discretion of the pastor, these sites will be utilized for weddings, funerals and feast days, as well as traditional and ethnic devotions. Because of the physical condition of some church buildings and the inability of the parishes to maintain them this will not be possible in all cases. Sunday Mass may also be celebrated at a worship site at the discretion of the pastor and the newly formed pastoral council. All parish property, assets and debts of the former parishes will be assumed by the newly created parishes, which will also be responsible for the care of all sacramental records.

The pastors from the merging parishes will form a transitional team made up of lay leaders from each of the merging parishes to assist in moving forward with building the new parish community.

The Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee, made up of lay persons, priests and Archdiocesan personnel, is examining all 267 parishes within the Archdiocese to gauge their viability and assess whether they possess the resources to accomplish their role in the mission of the Church and remain sustainable and vibrant faith communities. Parishes within each pastoral planning area will continue to carefully and thoughtfully examine their viability in order to make future recommendations. Additional parish announcements are expected in the fall of 2012 and the spring of 2013 and 2014.

Parish Area Pastoral Planning is designed to be as collaborative and consultative as possible. Its goal is to provide pastors, after consulting their parish leadership, with the opportunity to dialogue with members of the Strategic Planning Committee in providing joint recommendations to the Archbishop for growth and sustainability within their respective geographic areas. Additionally, in the majority of cases, the regional bishop and the dean meet with the pastors as well as their pastoral and finance councils to hear their concerns and receive their recommendations.

The Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee shared all final proposals with the Council of Priests and the College of Consultors for the review before final approval by the Archbishop.

Parish Announcements Effective July 1, 2012:


Coatesville:
Our Lady of the Rosary Parish and Saint Cecilia Parish will merge at the location and keep the name of Our Lady of the Rosary Parish.
Saint Joseph Parish and Saint Stanislaus Kostka Parish will merge at the location and keep the name of Saint Joseph Parish.

Germantown:
Saint Francis of Assisi Parish, Immaculate Conception Parish and Saint Vincent de Paul Parish will merge at the location and keep the name of Saint Vincent de Paul Parish.

West Oak Lane/East Mount Airy:
Saint Athanasius Parish and Saint Raymond of Peñafort Parish will remain as free standing parishes.

Manayunk:
Saint Lucy Parish and Holy Family Parish will merge at the location and keep the name of Holy Family Parish.
Saint John the Baptist Parish, Saint Josaphat Parish and Saint Mary of the Assumption Parish will merge at the location and keep the name of Saint John the Baptist Parish.

Future Announcements:


After reviewing all of the recent proposals, the Archbishop directed that the merger plans for the following parishes receive more input, broader consultation and further study:

Phoenixville:
Holy Trinity Parish, Saint Mary of the Assumption Parish and Sacred Heart Parish will be studied further with a final decision expected within the next few months.

Germantown/Mount Airy:
Holy Cross Parish, Saint Benedict Parish, Saint Madeleine Sophie Parish, and Saint Therese of the Child Jesus Parish will be studied further beginning in September 2012 with a final decision expected by the spring of 2013.

Background on Parish Announcements Effective July 1, 2012


**A parish is always more than statistics as they do not represent the whole of parish life. They were only one part of the larger picture when developing recommendations for parish mergers. They do, however, provide a snapshot of a parish's sacramental activity and a gauge to project stability, growth or decline.**

Our Lady of the Rosary and Saint Cecilia Parishes (Coatesville, Chester County)
Saint Cecilia Parish will merge with Our Lady of the Rosary Parish, which has a large seating capacity, excellent facilities and is fiscally stable. The two parishes are 1.2 miles away from each other. The merger will also allow for a strengthened outreach to the Hispanic community in the area. Saint Cecilia Church will remain as a worship site. The pastor of the newly formed parish will be appointed with the regular priest personnel announcements in May.

Our Lady of the Rosary Parish: 2006 2010
Infant Baptisms 61 31
Marriages 13 3
Weekend Mass attendance 905 774

Saint Cecilia Parish: 2006 2010
Infant Baptisms 35 22
Marriages 10 6
Weekend Mass attendance 783 656


Saint Joseph and Saint Stanislaus Kostka Parishes (Coatesville, Chester County)
Saint Stanislaus Kostka Parish, which has a significant operating deficit, will merge with Saint Joseph Parish, which continues to serve a growing Hispanic population through multiple programs. The two parishes are 0.3 miles away from each other Saint Stanislaus Kostka church will remain as a worship site. The pastor of the newly formed parish will be appointed with the regular priest personnel announcements in May.

Saint Joseph Parish: 2006 2010
Infant Baptisms 19 10
Marriages 2 1
Weekend Mass attendance 349 226

Saint Stanislaus Kostka Parish: 2006 2010
Infant Baptisms 1 0
Marriages 2 1
Weekend Mass attendance 249 188


Immaculate Conception, Saint Francis of Assisi and Saint Vincent de Paul Parishes (Germantown)
Immaculate Conception Parish and Saint Francis of Assisi Parish and will merge with Saint Vincent de Paul Parish. The three parishes, which are less than 1.25 miles from each other, are staffed by the Vincentian Fathers. The Vincentians recently indicated that they need to reduce the number of priests in that area from three to two. The planned mergers have taken into account the spiritual and social service needs provided by the parishes currently. It is hoped that a centralized parish organization will better serve the people of Germantown.

Neither the Immaculate Conception nor the Saint Francis of Assisi church buildings will be maintained as worship sites. Both churches require serious physical improvements for which the parishes have no funds. Both parishes have relied heavily on Archdiocesan subsidies for several years. All parish assets, debts, buildings, and sacramental records will be transferred to the newly formed parish. The name of this parish will be Saint Vincent de Paul. The Vincentian pastor of the newly formed parish will be announced shortly.

Immaculate Conception Parish: 2006 2010
Infant Baptisms 1 2
Marriages 1 0
Weekend Mass attendance 195 220

Saint Francis of Assisi Parish: 2006 2010
Infant Baptisms 11 2
Marriages 0 0
Weekend Mass attendance 199 101

Saint Vincent de Paul Parish: 2006 2010
Infant Baptisms 13 15
Marriages 3 4
Weekend Mass attendance 310 325


Holy Family and Saint Lucy Parishes (Manayunk)
Saint Lucy Parish, which has a significant operating deficit, will merge with Holy Family Parish, which is located less than half a mile away. The local regional Catholic elementary school is also located at Holy Family Parish. The Saint Lucy church will remain open as a worship site. The pastor of the newly formed parish will be appointed with the regular priest personnel announcements in May.

Holy Family Parish: 2006 2010
Infant Baptisms 16 23
Marriages 6 6
Weekend Mass attendance 518 422

Saint Lucy Parish: 2006 2010
Infant Baptisms 5 5
Marriages 7 3
Weekend Mass attendance 243 214


Saint John the Baptist, Saint Josaphat and Saint Mary of the Assumption Parishes (Manayunk)
Saint Josaphat Parish along with Saint Mary of the Assumption Parish will merge with Saint John the Baptist Parish, which is less than .25 miles away. Saint John the Baptist has the largest church building in the area and is the Mother Church of Manayunk. Saint Josaphat church and Saint Mary of the Assumption church will remain open as worship sites. The pastor of the newly formed parish will be appointed with the regular priest personnel announcements in May.

Saint John the Baptist Parish: 2006 2010
Infant Baptisms 48 55
Marriages 28 31
Weekend Mass attendance 738 748

Saint Josaphat Parish: 2006 2010
Infant Baptisms 3 2
Marriages 2 5
Weekend Mass attendance 314 198

Saint Mary of the Assumption Parish: 2006 2010
Infant Baptisms 6 7
Marriages 9 2
Weekend Mass attendance 259 276


Background on Future Parish Announcements


Holy Trinity, Sacred Heart, Saint Ann and Saint Mary of the Assumption Parishes (Phoenixville, Chester County)
The merger plan for these parishes will be studied further to obtain more input and broader consultation. A final decision is expected within the next few months.

Holy Cross, Saint Benedict, Saint Madeline Sophie, and Saint Therese of the Child Jesus Parishes (West Oak Lane/East Mount Airy)


The merger plan for these parishes will be studied further to obtain more input and broader consultation. A final decision is expected by the spring of 2013.

Editor's Note: The Archdiocese of Philadelphia is comprised of 44 Pastoral Planning Areas (PPAs). It is expected that the first 22 PPAs will complete the work of planning and implementation over the next two years and that additional two years will be required for the remainder of the PPAs. For more information on the Parish Area Pastoral Planning, please visit www.archphila.org.

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Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Students From Saint Dominic Parish School Win Chance To Play Basketball Against Their Teachers 7th Grade Students Raise The Most Money In Their School For Operation Rice Bowl

April 18, 2012

STUDENTS FROM SAINT DOMINIC PARISH SCHOOL WIN
CHANCE TO PLAY BASKETBALL AGAINST THEIR TEACHERS

7th Grade Students Raise the Most Money In Their School for Operation Rice Bowl

Students from Saint Dominic Parish School in Northeast Philadelphia recently met with Mr. Thomas Awiapo from Catholic Relief Services (CRS) in Ghana, who was in the United States speaking about the importance of Operation Rice Bowl during Lent. Mr. Awiapo shared his story of being orphaned before the age of ten and surviving poverty and hunger in his African village.

Mr. Awiapo's story inspired the students from Saint Dominic so much they decided to increase their Operation Rice Bowl efforts. Sister Shaun Thomas Callahan, I.H.M., Principal, promised students that the winning class would have the opportunity to play their teachers in a basketball game. The 7th grade students raised $800 and will play the school teachers on:

Friday, April 20, 2012
12:45 p.m.
Saint Dominic Parish School - Marian Hall
8510 Frankford Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19136


In Lent 2011, Catholics in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia contributed $336,000 dollars to Operation Rice Bowl, $84,000 of which went directly to Nutritional Development Services and the remainder went to Catholic Relief Services. Operation Rice Bowl is a way for Catholics to connect each Lenten season and demonstrate solidarity with the poor around the world through the traditional practices of prayer, fasting and almsgiving.

Editor's Note: For more information on Operation Rice Bowl please contact Anne H. Ayella, CRS Archdiocesan Director at 267-262-8901 or visit www.ndsarch.org. For more information on Catholic Relief Services please visit www.orb.crs.org.

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Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

2012 Catholic Charities Appeal (cca) Attracts Significant Donations<b/> Open Houses Will Be Held At Sites Throughout The Region To Showcase The Impact Of Cca

April 19, 2012

2012 CATHOLIC CHARITIES APPEAL (CCA)
ATTRACTS SIGNIFICANT DONATIONS

Open Houses will be held at sites throughout the region to showcase the impact of CCA

Two months after the official kick-off of the 2012 Catholic Charities Appeal, the single largest fundraising initiative in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia supporting the charitable works of the Church , the Appeal has raised more than $5.6 million and received more than 38,000 gifts. This figure has exceeded previous donation years and attracted nearly 19,000 donors who returned to the Appeal after having been away for a year or more, or have never donated before.

"The outpouring of support for the Catholic Charities Appeal has been nothing short of extraordinary. This year, we set an ambitious goal of $10 million, and despite these difficult economic times people are finding a way to give and support the thousands of impoverished individuals and families in our communities," said Archbishop Charles Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. "The response thus far gives me great hope that we can reach our goal and continue to provide help and create hope for those in need."

To provide supporters with a first-hand experience of the good works accomplished through their donations, the Catholic Charities Appeal is hosting a series of Open Houses on Sunday, April 22nd from 1:30 - 4:00pm. Visitors are welcome to take a guided tour and meet staff and some of those served by one of the programs of Catholic Social Services and supported by CCA. These programs provide residential care, education, and professional case management services to disadvantaged youth and developmentally disabled children and adults. Attending an Open House event is a great way to witness how Catholic Social Services and CCA together make a difference in the lives of so many people in the greater Philadelphia region every day.

The following locations will host an Open House on Sunday, April 22nd:

Saint Francis-St. Joseph Homes for Children (Bensalem, Bucks County):
3436 Bristol Pike
Bensalem, PA 19020

A campus residence and school for nearly 100 dependent, neglected or emotionally troubled male youth, St. Francis-St. Joseph offers individualized treatment programs that promote the personal and academic development of each young man, as well as maintaining and strengthening his family relationships.

Saint Lucy Day School for Children with Visual Impairments
& Archbishop Ryan Academy for the Deaf (Northeast section of Philadelphia):
4251 L Street
Philadelphia, PA 19124

This is one of the four operated by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia that are dedicated to the special educational needs of students in order to prepare them for the challenges of life and pursuit of higher education, by providing spiritual and academic instruction, as well as intense development of language skills and training in all areas of the expanded core curriculum.

Saint Gabriel's Hall(Audubon, Montgomery County):
1350 Pawlings Road
Norristown, PA 19407

This campus residence and school provides a structured setting for 200 young men ages 10 to 18 adjudicated by the Philadelphia court system, where they receive the transformative therapeutic, educational, and vocational support needed to support them in making better choices toward a positive and productive future.

Divine Providence Village(Springfield, Delaware County):
686 Old Marple Road
Springfield, PA 19064

A campus residence for adult women with developmental disabilities, Divine Providence Village provides these gifted individuals with daily occupational, recreational and spiritual opportunities to achieve greater independence and reach their fullest human potential.

Saint Edmond's Home for Children (Rosemont, Montgomery County):
320 South Roberts Road
Bryn Mawr, PA 19010

At this residence for 40 children with significant physical and developmental disabilities, a dedicated multi-disciplinary team of caring and qualified professionals offers a broad spectrum of medical/nursing and therapeutic services to assist each child to progress in achieving his/her greatest physical, intellectual, and social capacities.

In addition to these five exceptional Catholic Social Services and special education programs of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, the Catholic Charities Appeal also helps fund senior community centers, family service centers, hospices and shelters that house and feed the homeless, and afterschool programs for at-risk children. The Appeal constitutes vital support for 80 social service and educational programs that together provide hope and create help to over 250,000 people across the five-county region each year. Ninety two percent of the money raised during the Appeal directly benefits those members of our local community who are most in need.

Founded in 1958 by John Cardinal O'Hara, the Catholic Charities Appeal funds agencies and programs sponsored by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, reflecting our fundamental commitment to defend and promote the sanctity of all human life, the dignity of every individual, and the central role of healthy family life in our community.

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Editor's Note: For information about The Catholic Charities Appeal contact 215-587-3651 or visit www.catholiccharitiesappeal.org.

Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Celebrate Mass Marking The 100th Anniversary Of La Milagrosa Chapel Of The Cathedral Of Saints Peter And Paul

April 20, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO CELEBRATE
MASS MARKING THE 100TH ANNIVERSARY OF LA MILAGROSA

Chapel of the Cathedral of Saints Peter and Paul

Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., will be the main celebrant and homilist at a Mass marking the 100th Anniversary of Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal Chapel, known by the Hispanic community as La Milagrosa. It is the oldest house of worship in continuous use by the Hispanic community in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Archbishop Chaput will be joined by priests, religious, deacons, and lay leaders from the Hispanic Apostolate.

Saturday, April 21, 2012
5:00 p.m.
Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal Chapel
1903 Spring Garden Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103


La Milagrosa, was founded on April 26, 1912 to serve the growing Hispanic community in the city and its surrounding areas. For many years, it was the only church offering Mass in Spanish and serving primarily Spanish speakers in the Archdiocese. Today 37 Parishes offer Mass in Spanish thought out the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

La Milagrosa sparked the growth and establishment of the Hispanic Apostolate. The graduates of its formation programs went on to become leaders in over three dozen parishes serving the Hispanic community.

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Editor's Note: For more information on the Hispanic Apostolate visit The Office for Hispanic Catholics or call 215-667-2820.

Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialists
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Joins Great Schools Compact Compact Goal Is To Increase Access To Great Schools In Neighborhoods Throughout The City Of Philadelphia

April 23, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA JOINS GREAT SCHOOLS COMPACT
Compact goal is to increase access to great schools in neighborhoods
throughout the City of Philadelphia

Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. and Mayor Michael A. Nutter announced today that the Archdiocese of Philadelphia has signed on as a member of the Philadelphia Great Schools Compact, a united effort by the Mayor, the Pennsylvania Secretary of Education Ronald Tomalis, the School District, the School Reform Commission, charter schools, and Archdiocesan schools in Philadelphia to increase access to great schools in neighborhoods throughout the city. This announcement was made at St. Peter the Apostle School in Northern Liberties.

"The City of Philadelphia, the School Reform Commission, charter school leaders and now the Archdiocese have made a commitment to work together to transform education through the expansion of high-quality schools, the improvement of underperforming schools, and ensuring accountability," said Mayor Nutter, who himself attended parochial elementary school in West Philadelphia and a Catholic high school. "Our five-year goal is to ensure a seat in a quality school for every single student in Philadelphia. We can only achieve that goal through the collective efforts of all of our city's school providers."

Archbishop Chaput said, "The Archdiocese of Philadelphia is pleased to join in this Great Schools Compact and to be a part of this major education collaborative. We support the vision of the Great Schools Compact believing that all children-when challenged with high expectations-can learn at high levels. By signing this Great Schools Compact we declare our shared commitment to providing the children of Philadelphia outstanding education that will prepare them for postsecondary education and successful entry into the workplace of the 21st century."

To accomplish the goal of expanding the number of high-performing schools in Philadelphia, signers of the Compact have pledged to "eliminate barriers to collaboration" and "share information, best practices, resources, responsibility for success, and responsibility for failure." It is believed that Philadelphia is the first city in the nation where the local diocese has joined a school-collaboration compact.

The inclusion of the Archdiocese enhances opportunities for coordinating efforts among K-12 education providers and policymakers as they work toward dramatically increasing access to high-performing schools and addressing the obstacles that lie in their path. One such obstacle that is shared by both the Archdiocese and the School District is a large inventory of aging school facilities, many of which are underutilized. The signers of the Great Schools Compact are together vying for grants from national and local institutions to support the improvement and reuse of such facilities by growing charter and independent schools.

"Recently, officials from the School District and Archdiocese sat down together to study the potential impact on public schools of the proposed closings of Catholic schools," noted Lori Shorr, the Mayor's Chief Education Officer and Chair of the Great Schools Compact Committee. "Those meetings helped us to understand which of our schools would be most likely to see increased enrollment and to plan accordingly as we develop budgets and staffing plans for next academic year. We look forward to working together in the future to understand our respective priorities and identify ways we can assist each of our systems in improving academic outcomes for greater numbers of students."

The Great Schools Compact will create new avenues for all Philadelphia schools to share promising practices in the education sphere, such as learning models that blend virtual or computer instruction with traditional classroom teaching or innovations in assessing student progress. Ideas will also flow around innovation, best practices and cost savings. Both Catholic and public schools hope to identify opportunities for realizing economies of scale by sharing-or jointly purchasing-services.

"Catholic schools are an important education asset in the city of Philadelphia-providing quality, college-preparatory education," said Mark Gleason, executive director of the Philadelphia School Partnership. He noted that the Catholic school system is the second largest K-12 education provider in the city, with 25,000 students, or more than 10% of total students. Sixty-five percent of students in the city's Catholic schools are classified as economically disadvantaged, not far below the 78% figure in all types of public schools. "This announcement reinforces the commitment of the Mayor and other stakeholders in the Great Schools Compact to a vision for education that emphasizes school quality rather than school type."

PSP is a nonprofit organization that provides growth capital to all types of school providers-public and private-to help them expand access to high-performing schools by increasing enrollment, opening new schools or turning around failing schools. PSP also serves as the facilitator of the Great Schools Compact.

Today's announcement took place at Saint Peter the Apostle School, an Archdiocesan grade school located at 5th Street and Girard Avenue. The school is located at the site of the Shrine of Saint John Neumann, who during his tenure as bishop of Philadelphia is credited with establishing the first parochial school system in the country.

The backdrop for today's announcement was a mosaic designed by St. Peter the Apostle students, which reflects the cultural and racial diversity of the school's population. It features heroes such as Saint John Neumann, Blessed Teresa of Calcutta, Roberto Clemente, Rosa Parks, and Marian Anderson.

The Philadelphia School District, City of Philadelphia and representatives of more than 80 Philadelphia charter schools officially announced the signing of the Great Schools Compact in December 2011. The Compact represents a commitment by the organizations to work together to transform education through accountability, expansion of high-quality schools, and improvement of underperforming schools. It aims to replace or transform poor-performing schools that currently serve nearly 50,000 students so that all of those students are in better quality schools by 2016-17.

The formation of the Compact coincided with an announcement by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation that it was providing a $100,000 grant to support the implementation of the Compact. Philadelphia is one of 15 cities in the nation that have signed a District-Charter Collaboration Compact, which makes it eligible to compete for a share of more than $40 million in Gates Foundation funding and program-related investments.

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Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Saint John Vianney To Host Scholarship Sunday

April 26, 2012

SAINT JOHN VIANNEY TO HOST SCHOLARSHIP SUNDAY


Parishioners from Saint John Vianney Church in Gladwyne, Montgomery County, will host an inaugural induction ceremony for their 2012 Saint John Vianney Scholars. Bishop Michael Fitzgerald, who oversees Catholic education in the Archdiocese, will preside.

Sunday, April 29, 2012
11:00 a.m. (Mass); 12:00 p.m. (Ceremony)
Saint John Vianney Parish
354 Conshohocken State Road
Gladwyne, PA 19035 (Montgomery County)


Since its official launch earlier this year, the program has recognized eight deserving students who currently attend an Archdiocesan parish elementary school with a $3,000 a year scholarship for four years to attend an Archdiocesan High School beginning in 2012-2013.

The 2012 scholars come from the following Catholic elementary schools in the city of Philadelphia: Holy Reedmer Parish School, Our Lady of Port Richmond Regional Catholic School, Saint Athanasius-Immaculate Conception School, Saint Martin de Porres Mission School, Saint Mary Interparochial School, Saint Peter the Apostle Parish School and Visitation B.V.M. Parish School.

The mission of the Saint John Vianney Scholars Program is to provide financial and academic support to children who are involved in their community and motivated to excel in school. The program hopes to provide many students with scholarships in the coming years as well as introduce this program to other parishes in the Archdiocese. Through their partnership with the Connelly Foundation, they are also able to provide the scholarship awardees with additional resources.

Following the ceremony there will be a reception hosted by the Saint John Vianney Scholars Board for all parishioners to meet the newly selected Saint John Vianney Scholars.

For more information about Saint John Vianney Scholars Program please visit bit.ly/StJohnVianneyScholars.

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Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput Celebrates The Bond Of Marriage Couples Married 1, 25, 50 Years Or More Are Invited To The Annual Anniversary Mass

April 30, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT CELEBRATES THE BOND OF MARRIAGE
Couples Married 1, 25, 50 years or more are invited to the annual Anniversary Mass


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., will celebrate Mass for couples who have been married 1, 25, 50, or more years at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul. The annual Anniversary Mass is a celebration and tribute to family and the Sacrament of Marriage. This year, the Masses will be celebrated on two days, Saturday and Sunday, and will include for the first time couples who have been married 1-5 years.

Couples married 25 years or more and couples married 1-5 years
Saturday, May 5, 2012
5:15 p.m.
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103

Couples married 50 years or more
Sunday, May 6, 2012
11:00 a.m.
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Hundreds of married couples from the five counties of the Archdiocese gather at the Cathedral each year for the Anniversary Mass. Husbands and wives celebrating their Golden and Silver Anniversary and other milestones gather with their children, grandchildren, family and friends to celebrate their marriage.

No prior registration is required. Friends and family are encouraged to attend.

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Editor's Note: For more information or questions about the Wedding Anniversary Masses, please contact the Family Life Office at 215-587-5639 or email famlife@adphila.org.



Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Bishop Fitzgerald To Celebrate Mass And Recognize Over 150 Catholics At Awards Ceremony

May 3, 2012

BISHOP FITZGERALD TO CELEBRATE MASS
AND RECOGNIZE OVER 150 CATHOLICS AT AWARDS CEREMONY


Bishop Michael Fitzgerald, who oversees the Office for Youth and Young Adults (OYYA), will be the celebrant and homilist for a Mass honoring approximately 157 Catholics who have provided outstanding service and leadership in youth and young adult ministry within the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Bishop Fitzgerald will present awards after Mass.


Tuesday, May 8, 2012
7:00 p.m. (Mass)
Awards Ceremony to follow Mass
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia first held its Recognition Celebration in 1965, presented by the Department of Youth Activities (now the Office for Youth and Young Adults). It is designed to honor and recognize outstanding men and women in the field of youth ministry. The awards are the highest form of recognition from the National Federation of Catholic Youth Ministry. Students are eligible to receive The St. Timothy Award; parish youth ministers are eligible to receive The Companions on the Journey Award, which is also presented in honor of Bill O'Neill to athletic ministers, coaches or parish athletic directors. In Philadelphia, we also present The Blessed Frassati Award recognizing adults who exemplify the best attributes of Catholic teaching in young adult ministry.

The St. Timothy Award, (formerly known as the Eagle of the Cross) the highest recognition from the National Federation of Catholic Youth Ministry, is presented to junior or senior high school young men or women for outstanding leadership and service to their parish and community. In the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, Parish Youth Ministry and Community Service Corps present the St. Timothy award at their respective recognition ceremonies.

Criteria:
- Lives as a disciple of Christ, setting a positive example for other youth
- Witnesses to his or her faith by exhibiting Catholic morals and integrity
- Demonstrates Gospel values through service to others
- Exhibits Christian leadership in parish, school, and/or community settings

The Companions on the Journey Award, (formerly known as the For God and Youth Award) the highest recognition from the National Federation of Catholic Youth Ministry, is presented to adults who exemplify the best attributes of ministry and Catholic teaching to youth.

Criteria:
- Excellence in Youth Ministry as reflected in Renewing the Vision, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops Document regarding Youth Ministry
- Commitment to on-going education and formation
- Longevity in ministry
- Commitment to young people
- Outstanding leadership at the parish level

The Bill O'Neill Award is presented to coaches or parish athletic directors who exemplify the best attributes of coaching and Catholic teaching to young athletes. The award is recognized nationally as the Companions on the Journey award (formerly known as the For God and Youth Award). This award is presented in honor of Mr. Bill O'Neill, who began his dedication to serving youth through the CYO in the late 1950's. He continued onward for 35 years holding different positions for St. Matthew Parish's CYO and Region 1 CYO Athletics, such as Coach, Commissioner, and Assistant Athletic Director for the Archdiocesan Athletic Ministry Office. Mr. O'Neill always displayed a positive attitude and Christ-like spirit while working with youth. His dedication to the involvement of young people in the parish community through athletics is a cornerstone for the wonderful program that we enjoy today.

The Blessed Frassati Award recognizes adults who exemplify the best attributes of Catholic teaching in young adult ministry.

Criteria:
- Excellence in Young Adult Ministry as reflected in Sons and Daughters of the Light, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops Document regarding Young Adult Ministry
- Commitment to on-going education and formation
- Outstanding leadership at the parish level


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Editor's Note: Fore more information about the Mass and the Recognition Ceremony please visit the OYYA website, www.oyya.org. If you have any questions about this event, please contact Maria Richardson at 215-965-4639 or mrichard@adphila.org.


Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Announces Resolutions In A Number Of Cases Of Priests On Administrative Leave Archbishop Chaput Announces Initiative To Provide Support And Assistance To Parishioners As They And The Church Come To Terms With The Past, Seek To Understand Sexual Violence, And Create An Environment That Is Safe And Welcoming To Those Who Have Been Victimized

May 4, 2012

THE ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA ANNOUNCES RESOLUTIONS IN A NUMBER OF CASES OF PRIESTS ON ADMINISTRATIVE LEAVE
Archbishop Chaput announces initiative to provide support and assistance to parishioners as they and the Church come to terms with the past, seek to understand sexual violence, and create an environment that is safe and welcoming to those who have been victimized


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced today that the work of a special team investigating the 26 priests publicly placed on leave by Cardinal Rigali last year is now largely done. Archbishop Charles Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., has made final decisions in eight of the cases of the priests who were put on administrative leave following the February 2011 Grand Jury Report, which urged the Archdiocese to review cases of past allegations of sexual abuse of minors by clergy and some cases involving violations of the Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries.

"The process of reviewing these cases was designed to ensure that the decisions announced today reflect our commitment to protect children, assist victims, restore the integrity of the priesthood and provide evidence to the broader community that they can have confidence in these outcomes," said Archbishop Chaput.

Through a rigorous investigative process, involving over 20 experts in child abuse, three of the priests have been found suitable for ministry and five have been found not suitable for ministry due to a substantiated allegation of sexual abuse of a minor or substantiated violation of the Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries. One priest on leave died before the investigation was complete so no finding could be determined. The priests found unsuitable for ministry will have no public ministry in the Archdiocese. They do have the right to appeal the decision with the Holy See. Depending upon the substantiated allegation, if they do not appeal, or if their appeal is unsuccessful, they could be laicized (removed from the clerical state), live under some supervision, or live a life of prayer and penance.

To lead these investigations the Archdiocese hired veteran child abuse prosecutor Gina Maisto Smith, who assembled a multidisciplinary team of experts. All cases of the priests on leave were referred to the appropriate local district attorney prior to investigation by the multidisciplinary team. The multidisciplinary team, which reports to Smith, is composed of seven local and national authorities in the area of child sexual abuse, including a forensic psychiatrist, a psychologist who specializes in evaluating and treating sexual offenders, a pediatrician who leads the Child Protection Program at St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, two former Philadelphia detectives from the Special Victims Unit, and two former Philadelphia assistant district attorneys.

To date, the multidisciplinary team has located, gathered and reviewed more than 400,000 pages of relevant documents, identified, located and interviewed 227 witnesses, across the United States and in several foreign countries, and conducted countless site visits to parishes and schools where incidents were alleged to have occurred. Many cases involved a search for additional evidence including yearbooks, parish records, photographs and public documents. Some cases dated as far back in time as 40 years, which posed significant investigative challenges.

Mrs. Smith said, "We took care to develop a process that is thorough, impartial and fair. We recognize that allegations of child sexual abuse can be incendiary in nature. The stakes are high for both the accused and the accuser. Moreover, most child sexual abuse cases turn on credibility-the evaluation of word against word. Accordingly, the process must be painstakingly detailed. Its integrity is demonstrated by an exhaustive search for corroboration - a synthesis of witness interviews, documents and any additional available evidence, all of which must be analyzed in light of the expertise of the multidisciplinary team."

When the multidisciplinary team forwarded its completed investigations to the Archbishop, he asked the Archdiocesan Review Board to also review the cases and to provide him with a recommendation. In the past year the Review Board added nine new members, some of whom were appointed by Archbishop Chaput and some by Cardinal Justin Rigali. New Review Board members include a professor of forensic psychiatry, a former chief in the child abuse unit of the Philadelphia District Attorney's office and a member of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Sexual Offender Assessment Board.

Not all of the administrative leave cases were announced today. Of those 26 men removed from active ministry last year six of the 26 cases are being held by law enforcement for further review. In addition, two more of the 26 cases were recently released by law enforcement and are currently under investigation by the multidisciplinary team.

Of the remaining nine cases, all investigations are complete and are pending examination by the Review Board or a final decision by Archbishop Chaput. Due to the ongoing process there is no indication as to when the resolutions of the remaining cases will be made, however the Archdiocese hopes to announce them as soon as possible.

"I've been in Philadelphia for less than a year, and I've tried as quickly as possible to understand all of the many issues facing our local Church," said Archbishop Chaput. "During that time, dealing with sexual abuse and protecting children has been-and will remain-a top priority for me and for this Archdiocese. Our actions, including these outcomes and the steps we have taken to improve our policies and procedures, show that we have learned from the past. No lesson from the sexual abuse scandal is more important than the understanding that the people who suffer most are the victims."

Last year, the Archdiocese separated the investigative function from its victim assistance program and created a distinct Office for Investigations. Al Toczydlowski, former Philadelphia Deputy District Attorney, was appointed as the head of the newly developed office to ensure immediate referral to law enforcement, cooperation with county district attorney's offices and thorough investigations as part of the canonical process. The clear division between victim assistance and investigation allows Archdiocesan victim assistance efforts to focus exclusively on the needs of victims. The Archdiocese also appointed Leslie Davila, who has more than 15 years of experience in working with victims of crime most recently with the Philadelphia District Attorney's office, to lead this effort as the Director of the Office for Child and Youth Protection. The Archdiocese is also finalizing new policies and procedures for handling allegations of sexual abuse of a minor, which will reflect lessons learned from the investigative process used to determine the cases announced today.

With the announcements of the resolution of these first cases, the Archdiocese will now begin a program that will provide support and assistance to parishioners as they and the Church come to terms with the past, seek to understand sexual violence, and create an environment that is safe and welcoming to those who have been victimized. This initiative, entitled Honesty, Healing and Hope in Christ: Confronting Sexual Violence in Our Archdiocese, identifies three primary stakeholders: the victims of the allegation or violation of The Standards of Ministerial Behaviors and Boundaries, the parishioners who include school and Parish Religious Education Program (PREP) families, and the priests on administrative leave.

The plan, which consists of four phases over six months, is designed to address the feelings and responses experienced when final resolutions are announced and going forward.

Through the implementation of this initiative, the Archdiocese begins a journey of honesty, healing and hope toward the restoration of trust.

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Editor's Note: For more information please visit www.archphila.org.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Remarks Of Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.f.m. Cap. At News Conference Announcing Resolutions In A Number Of Cases Of Priests On Administrative Leave

May 4, 2012

REMARKS OF ARCHBISHOP CHARLES J. CHAPUT, O.F.M. CAP.
AT NEWS CONFERENCE ANNOUNCING RESOLUTIONS IN A NUMBER OF CASES OF PRIESTS ON ADMINISTRATIVE LEAVE


Good afternoon. Thank you for being here.

I'm pleased to share with you today that the work of the special team investigating the 26 priests publicly placed on leave by Cardinal Rigali last year is now largely done. Eight of the 26 cases are being announced today. Most of the remainder will be announced in a matter of weeks.

You'll recall that the 2011 grand jury report challenged the Archdiocese to review certain cases of past allegations of sexual abuse of minors by clergy as well as some cases involving violations of the Archdiocese's Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries.

The Archdiocese has reviewed these 26 cases with the intensive examination of a veteran Philadelphia child abuse prosecutor, Mrs. Gina Maisto (MY-east-toe) Smith, and a multi-disciplinary team of recognized experts in the field of child protection. Moreover, the multi-disciplinary team's findings were then studied by the reinvigorated Archdiocesan Review Board. These two groups included doctors, police officers, former prosecutors, victims' advocates and other people with experience in the broad societal problem of sexual abuse of minors.

The process of reviewing these cases was designed to ensure that the decisions announced today reflect our commitment to protect children, assist victims, restore the integrity of the Priesthood and provide evidence to the broader community that it can have confidence in these outcomes.
I've been in Philadelphia for eight months, and I've tried as quickly as possible to understand all of the many issues facing our local Church. During that time, preventing sexual abuse and protecting children has been-and will remain-a priority for me and for this Archdiocese.

No lesson from the abuse scandal is more important than the understanding that the people who suffer most are the victims. Over the years, as part of my ministry as a bishop, I have met personally with many victims and this humbling experience has taught me that no words can sufficiently describe the hurt a victim feels. I have in the past and again today share my deep sadness and again offer a heartfelt apology on behalf of the Archdiocese to all victims of clergy sexual abuse.

I noted at the outset that today we are announcing eight decisions in these 26 cases. Three priests have been found suitable for ministry. Five priests will not return to ministry although they retain the right to appeal this decision to the Holy See. A ninth priest is now deceased, and his case cannot be concluded.

The remaining 17 cases cannot be announced today, and people will obviously want to know why. When Cardinal Rigali began this process more than a year ago, he pledged to do an exhaustive review of all these cases. The task of investigating past allegations of sexual misconduct is complex and time-consuming. It cannot be hurried or abbreviated without violating the whole purpose of the review. I should also mention that we've been very limited in what we can say about these cases because of current legal proceedings and the gag order put in place to protect those proceedings.

We cooperate fully with law enforcement and refer all our cases to the local district attorney. Six of the 26 cases have not yet been cleared by law enforcement, so our own internal investigation has not begun. In two more of the 26 cases, we've just recently received clearance from law enforcement, and our internal investigation is now proceeding. But in the final nine cases, all our investigations are complete, and the cases are awaiting either examination by the Archdiocesan Review Board or a decision by me. As a result, these will be announced very soon.

Information about the cases announced today is on our website and will be available in all parishes this weekend.

I realize that you'd like me to provide considerable detail about these cases. That I cannot do. And I need to balance the need for transparency with the pain already felt by victims-pain which we acknowledge and do not wish to compound. It's important for the victims themselves to control to whom, when, and how extensively they disclose their accounts, and we support whatever that decision may be.

I do think it's important to share with you more information about the process we used to arrive at these final decisions. In every decision I relied on the counsel of more than 20 experts in two separate bodies. The first is a special multi-disciplinary team, led by Mrs. Smith. The other is our Archdiocesan Review Board. Members of both groups are with us here today, and I'd like to thank them for their valuable work. They come from various professional disciplines and have dedicated their lives to child protection-to the investigation of sexual offenders and support for victims of sexual violence. On our website you can find more details about their background and credentials. I thank each one of these men and women for undertaking this serious task. I reviewed each case personally and made the final decision regarding every one of them. I met personally this week with each of the eight priests whose cases have been completed and delivered the outcomes that are now being shared with you.

In resolving these cases, we've also made significant changes in our process for investigating sexual abuse allegations and violations of The Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries. Last year, the Archdiocese removed the investigative function from our victim assistance program. We created a separate Office for Investigations and appointed Mr. Al Toczydlowski, former Philadelphia Deputy District Attorney, as its head to ensure immediate referral to law enforcement, to ensure cooperation with county district attorney's offices and thorough investigation so that thorough investigations can be part of the canonical process. This office uses a trained forensic interviewer to take victim statements in an effort to reduce any potential re-victimization.

The clear division between victim assistance and investigation allows our victim assistance efforts to focus exclusively on the needs of victims. Last summer, the Archdiocese appointed Ms. Leslie Davila to head those efforts. She comes to us from the Philadelphia District Attorney's office; and she has more than 15 years of experience in working with victims of crime, including victims of sexual assault. Ms. Davila's office and these new practices are also now a permanent part of the Archdiocese.
The investigative work of Mrs. Smith's multi-disciplinary team will conclude with the resolution of the administrative leave cases. Future allegations of sexual abuse of minors will continue to be examined by the Archdiocesan Review Board. With the guidance of Mrs. Smith, Mr. Toczydlowski, and Ms. Davila, I have added new members to the Review Board. I am confident that this board is one of the best in the country.

We've taken many steps in the past year to reform and improve the way the Archdiocese lives up to its duty to protect children. There are enhanced policies and procedures for handling allegations of sexual abuse of a minor which are under final review. Going forward they will reflect the lessons learned from this process. For example, we take all allegations of sexual abuse of a minor by clergy to the Archdiocesan Review Board; but we do the same now for all complaints involving violations of The Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries.

We will now begin our parish restoration initiative-a program titled Honesty, Healing, and Hope in Christ, which is led by our Victim Services Consultant, Ms. Mary Achilles. Mary will discuss it in greater detail shortly. This is a program about dealing with sexual violence. It's about providing support to parishioners as they and the wider Church seek to build an environment that is safe for all families and welcoming to those who have been victimized.

Before I turn the podium over to Mrs. Smith, who will briefly discuss the multi-disciplinary team and the process, let me leave you with one more thought. Catholics have struggled with confusion and anger. When a child is harmed, the Church has failed. When trust is lost, the Church has failed. When the whole community suffers as a result, the Church has failed. We can't change the past. But I pray-and I do believe-that the lessons of the last year have made our Church humbler, wiser, and a more vigilant guardian of our people's safety. That is our commitment today, tomorrow, and permanently.

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Editor's Note: For more information please visit www.archphila.org.


Contact
Donna Farrell
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Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Thoughts On An Invitation To Grace

May 10, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
THOUGHTS ON AN INVITATION TO GRACE


Later this month, on May 19, I'll ordain new priests for our local Church. This is a special moment of joy for me, since these new brothers will be the first I welcome into the priesthood as Archbishop of Philadelphia. But every new priest is a source of joy and hope for all our people. In the wake of so many difficulties for our Church over the past 15 months, we need to pause and reflect.

Every genuine love story is a great love story; and every great love story creates new life. Real love is always fruitful. The love of husbands and wives bears fruit most obviously in the lives of their children, but also in many forms of Christian service . . . and also in the witness which their love provides to other people.

So it is with the priesthood. Priests are called to be fruitful, but in a different and profoundly important way. They nourish the Church with their lives. They create a witness of radical service, and a legacy of spiritual children and apostolic works.

The point is this: The community of faith is not so different from the individuals who live and love within it. The Church is the bride of Christ -- and that love needs to bear fruit. The new life which the Church brings into the world is salvation in Jesus Christ, through preaching and teaching the Gospel, and offering the sacraments. This is why, in the Gospel of Matthew, Jesus tells us, "Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit . . ."

Jesus was talking to us -- to all of us; but in a special way, to his priests. If a priest does not actively share his love of Jesus Christ with others, then it diminishes in his own heart. Priests who fail to witness that love with purity and integrity, lose it. And no priest can be happy without it. That's what St. Paul meant when he wrote, "Woe to me if I do not preach the Gospel." It's not that God punishes those who do not preach God's word; instead, they steal joy from themselves, because the joy of Christ's presence can only be had by sharing Christ with others. The priest, like any parent or anyone truly in love, "gets" by giving away. So if Baptism indelibly marks every Christian as a missionary, Orders takes that vocation even further, intimately and permanently configuring a man to Jesus himself, the greatest Love of them all.

Take a look around. The world needs Jesus Christ as never before. As a Church in the early years of a new millennium, we find ourselves in the midst of a powerful, skeptical and sharply divided society - a culture fueled by both pride and anxiety. In today's America, we live in mission territory. This is the new Areopagus. Philadelphia is no exception. The legacy of Catholic achievement in our Archdiocese is extraordinary. But it can easily blind us to the new work that God now calls us to do.

Each of us should reflect long and deeply on the meaning of the "new evangelization." Those words have weight; they're not just a slogan. A new missionary spirit needs to be born in each of our hearts, both lay and clergy; and if it is, then God will use it to win the soul of the world around us to Jesus Christ.

In a special way, we should focus on forming and supporting our priests as effectively as we can. The reason is simple. There's no Gospel witness without the Church; there's no Church without the Eucharist; and there's no Eucharist without the priest. We need more priests -- good men who are well formed; men of courage, zeal and genuine humility; men who love Jesus Christ and his people, and prove it with their lives. This is the first and most urgent step in renewing our Church.

Of course, if it stops there -- no matter how many good seminarians we attract -- we fail. Ultimately, while there's no Church without the Eucharist, and no Eucharist without the priest, it's also true that there are no priests without families on fire for Jesus Christ. Families who help their sons to hear God's call; who affirm and support and encourage the priests who already serve them; who live their lives in a way which proves to our priests that their own sacrifices make a difference.

What I pray God builds through us in our Archdiocese over the next decade, is not just an old way of seminary formation with a new vocabulary, more numbers and an updated marketing strategy, but something true to what the "new evangelization" really is -- a communion and mission of the whole Church, ordained, religious and lay, each respecting the other, each serving the other, all serving the Lord by bringing the Good News to the world, and the world to the Good News.

That's the equality of the faithful: each vocation unique and invaluable in dignity; each complementing and completing the other in the Lord; altogether in service; and on fire with the love of God. May 19 is an invitation to grace; but so is every ordination, every marriage, every baptism. I hope that in the years ahead we can look back on 2012 and say, this is where our hearts changed. This is where God began something new. And if we can, then like Simeon, we can go home to him in gratitude and peace.

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Editor's Note: Archbishop Chaput's columns are published regularly on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.htm.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Ordain Six Men To The Priesthood These Are The First Priests To Be Ordained By Archbishop Chaput In Philadelphia

May 15, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO ORDAIN
SIX MEN TO THE PRIESTHOOD

These are the first priests to be ordained by Archbishop Chaput in Philadelphia


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will ordain six men to the priesthood for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. All have completed their priestly formation and studies at Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary in Wynnewood, Montgomery County. The Rite of Ordination will take place during Mass following Archbishop Chaput's homily. The Mass will be streamed live at www.archphila.org.

Saturday, May 19, 2012
9:45 a.m. (Procession)
10:00 a.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Those being ordained are: Rev. Mr. Daniel J. Dwyer; Rev. Mr. Anthony R. Hangholt; Rev. Mr. Robert A. Ianelli; Rev. Mr. John P. Masson; Rev. Mr. Timothy J. McGuire; and Rev. Mr. Thomas P. Whittingham.

Each of the newly ordained priests will be assigned to a parish in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia where they will serve as parochial vicars. A parochial vicar is a priest appointed by the Archbishop to assist the pastor of a parish.

# # #

Editor's Note: Individual news releases on each new priest are available at www.archphila.org. Photos are also available. Please contact Jhoselyn Martinez to request photograph at Jmartinez@adphila.org.

An audio and video mult-box feed will be provided in the parking lot of the Cathedral. Please enter on 17th Street, between Race and Vine Streets. Crews will need a bnc connector and a recording deck or a live truck. Television cameras will not be permitted in the Cathedral. Reporters and still photographers will be permitted in the Cathedral but are asked to refrain from the center aisle.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Daniel J. Dwyer To Be Ordained To The Priesthood By Archbishop Chaput

May 15, 2012

DANIEL J. DWYER TO BE ORDAINED
TO THE PRIESTHOOD BY ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT


The Rev. Mr. Daniel J. Dwyer, son of the late Mr. Francis Dwyer and Mrs. Catherine Dwyer, will be ordained to the priesthood by Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. on

Saturday, May 19, 2012
9:45 a.m. (Procession)
10:00 a.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


A native of Philadelphia, PA, Rev. Mr. Dwyer has been serving as deacon at Nativity of Our Lord Parish in Warminster, Bucks County. He attended Saint Gabriel Parish Elementary in Philadelphia, Saint John Neumann High School, Philadelphia, received his Bachelor of Arts from Cabrini College (1986) Radnor, and he earned his Master of Divinity (1994) degree at Saint Charles Seminary. Rev. Mr. Dwyer taught Theology and Religion for the next 15 years in Archdiocesan high schools. He resumed his studies at Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary in 2010.

Father Dwyer will celebrate his First Mass on
Sunday, May 20, 2012
12:00 p.m.
Saint Gabriel Parish Church
2917 Dickinson Street
Philadelphia, PA 19146


The homilist will be Reverend Angelo Citino. Concelebrants include Reverend Thomas Dunleavy and Reverend Angelo Citino.

There are six men from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia in the Ordination Class of 2012. Each of the newly ordained priests will be assigned to an Archdiocesan parish where they will serve as parochial vicars. A parochial vicar is a priest appointed by the Archbishop to assist the pastor of a parish.

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Editor's Note: If you would like to receive a photograph of Father Dwyer electronically, please contact the Office for Communications at 215-587-3747 or email Jmartinez@adphila.org.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Anthony R. Hangholt To Be Ordained To The Priesthood By Archbishop Chaput

May 15, 2012

ANTHONY R. HANGHOLT TO BE ORDAINED
TO THE PRIESTHOOD BY ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT


The Rev. Mr. Anthony R. Hangholt, 29, son of Mrs. Catherine R. Hangholt and Mr. Robert Hangholt, will be ordained to the priesthood by Archbishop Charles J. Chaput O.F.M. Cap. on

Saturday, May 19, 2012
9:45 a.m. (Procession)
10:00 a.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


A native of Boothwyn, PA, Rev. Mr. Hangholt has been serving as deacon at Saint Aloysius Parish, Montgomery County. He attended Holy Savior-Saint John Fisher Parish Elementary School (1988-1996) in Linwood, Cardinal O'Hara High School (2000) Springfield, received his Bachelor of Science from Temple University (2006) Philadelphia, and he earned his Master of Divinity (2011) and his Master of Arts (2012) degrees from Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary.

Father Hangholt will celebrate his First Mass on
Sunday, May 20, 2012
2:00 p.m.
Holy Savior Parish Church (Delaware County)
108 E. Ridge Road
Linwood, PA 19061
>

The homilist will be Reverend Philip Lowe. Concelebrants include Reverend Michael Gerlach, Reverend Gasper Genuardi, Reverend Joseph Maloney, Reverend John Sibel, Reverend Philip Lowe, and Reverend Monsignor Edward Deliman.

There are six men from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia in the Ordination Class of 2012. Each of the newly ordained priests will be assigned to an Archdiocesan parish where they will serve as parochial vicars. A parochial vicar is a priest appointed by the Archbishop to assist the pastor of a parish.

###


Editor's Note: If you would like to receive a photograph of Father Hangholt electronically, please contact the Office for Communications at 215-587-3747 or email Jmartinez@adphila.org.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Robert A. Ianelli To Be Ordained To The Priesthood By Archbishop Chaput

May 15, 2012

ROBERT A. IANELLI TO BE ORDAINED
TO THE PRIESTHOOD BY ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT/b>
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The Rev. Mr. Robert A. Ianelli, 26, son of Mr. Robert Ianelli and Mrs. Theresa Ianelli, will be ordained to the priesthood by Archbishop Charles J. Chaput O.F.M. Cap. on

Saturday, May 19, 2012
9:45 a.m. (Procession)
10:00 a.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


A native of Philadelphia, PA, Rev. Mr. Ianelli has been serving as deacon at Our Lady of Guadalupe in Buckingham, Bucks County. He attended Saint Timothy Parish Elementary School (1999) Philadelphia, Father Judge High School (2003) Philadelphia, La Salle University (2003-2005) Philadelphia, and he earned his Bachelor of Arts (2008), Master of Divinity (2011) and his Master of Arts (2012) degrees from Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary.

Father Ianelli will celebrate his First Mass on
Sunday, May 20, 2012
2:30 p.m.
Saint Timothy Parish Church
3001 Levick Street
Philadelphia, PA 19149


The homilist will be Reverend Stephen F. Leva. Concelebrants include Monsignor Reverend Kevin Lawrence, Reverend Stephen F. Leva, Reverend Paul O'Donnell, Reverend Thomas Gardner, and Reverend Christopher Picollo.

There are six men from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia in the Ordination Class of 2012. Each of the newly ordained priests will be assigned to an Archdiocesan parish where they will serve as parochial vicars. A parochial vicar is a priest appointed by the Archbishop to assist the pastor of a parish.

###


Editor's Note: If you would like to receive a photograph of Father Ianelli electronically, please contact the Office for Communications at 215-587-3747 or email Jmartinez@adphila.org.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

John P. Masson To Be Ordained To The Priesthood By Archbishop Chaput

May 15, 2012

JOHN P. MASSON TO BE ORDAINED
TO THE PRIESTHOOD BY ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT


The Rev. Mr. John P. Masson, 26, son of Mr. Dennis Masson and Mrs. Catherine Masson, will be ordained to the priesthood by Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. on

Saturday, May 19, 2012
9:45 a.m. (Procession)
10:00 a.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


A native of West Chester, PA, Rev. Mr. Masson has been serving as deacon at Saint Bede the Venerable Parish in Holland, Bucks County. He attended Saint Agnes Parish Elementary School (2000) in West Chester, Bishop Shanahan High School (2004) Downingtown, James Madison University (2004-2005) Harrisonburg, VA, and he earned his Bachelor of Arts (2008), Master of Divinity (2011) and his Master of Arts (2012) degrees from Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary.

Father Masson will celebrate his First Mass on
Sunday, May 20, 2012
2:00 p.m.
Saint Agnes Parish Church (Chester County)
233 West Gay Street
West Chester, PA 19380


The homilist will be Reverend Monsignor John Marine. Concelebrants include Reverend Paul Richard Masson, M.M., Reverend Monsignor Nelson Perez, and Reverend Monsignor John Marine.

There are six men from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia in the Ordination Class of 2012. At the end of May, each of the newly ordained priests will be assigned to an Archdiocesan parish where they will serve as parochial vicars. A parochial vicar is a priest appointed by the Archbishop to assist the pastor of a parish.

###


Editor's Note: If you would like to receive a photograph of Father Masson electronically, please contact the Office for Communications at 215-587-3747 or email Jmartinez@adphila.org.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Timothy J. Mcguire To Be Ordained To The Priesthood By Archbishop Chaput

May 15, 2012

TIMOTHY J. MCGUIRE TO BE ORDAINED
TO THE PRIESTHOOD BY ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT


The Rev. Mr. Timothy J. McGuire, 27, son of Mr. John Preston and Mrs. Toni McGuire-Preston, will be ordained to the priesthood by Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. on

Saturday, May 19, 2012
9:45 a.m. (Procession)
10:00 a.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


A native of Lansdowne, PA, Rev. Mr. McGuire has been serving as deacon at Saint John the Evangelist Parish, Morrisville, Bucks County. He attended Saint Philomena Parish Elementary School, Lansdowne, Cardinal O'Hara High School, Springfield, and he earned his Bachelor of Arts (2008), and Master of Divinity (2011) degrees from Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary.

Father McGuire will celebrate his First Mass on
Sunday, May 20, 2012
2:30 p.m.
Saint Philomena Parish Church (Delaware County)
41 E. Baltimore Avenue
Lansdowne, PA 19050


The homilist will be Reverend Michael Pawelko. Concelebrants include Reverend Monsignor David Benz, Reverend Monsignor Joseph Prior, Reverend Michael Pawelko and Reverend Frank Guiffre.

There are six men from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia in the Ordination Class of 2012. Each of the newly ordained priests will be assigned to an Archdiocesan parish where they will serve as parochial vicars. A parochial vicar is a priest appointed by the Archbishop to assist the pastor of a parish.

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Editor's Note: If you would like to receive a photograph of Father McGuire electronically, please contact the Office for Communications at 215-587-3747 or email Jmartinez@adphila.org.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Thomas P. Whittingham To Be Ordained To The Priesthood By Archbishop Chaput

May 15, 2012

THOMAS P. WHITTINGHAM TO BE ORDAINED
TO THE PRIESTHOOD BY ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT


The Rev. Mr. Thomas P. Whittingham, 33, son of Mr. Paul Whittingham and Mrs. Martha Whittingham, will be ordained to the priesthood by Archbishop J. Charles Chaput O.F.M. Cap. on

Saturday, May 19, 2012
9:45 a.m. (Procession)
10:00 a.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


A native of Oak Ridge, TN, Rev. Mr. Whittingham has been serving as deacon at Saint Patrick Parish, Norristown, Montgomery County. He attended Saint Mary Parish Elementary School, Oak Ridge, TN; Jefferson Junior High School, Oak Ridge, TN; University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN; University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; and he earned his Master of Divinity (2011) and his Master of Arts (2012) degrees from Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary.

Father Whittingham will celebrate his First Mass on
Sunday, May 20, 2012
3:00 p.m.
Mother of Divine Providence Parish Church (Montgomery County)
333 Allendale Road
King of Prussia, PA 19406


The homilist will be Reverend Steven J. Marinucci. Concelebrants include Reverend Martin Cioppi, Reverend Charles Zlock, Reverend Augustus Puleo, Reverend Steven J. Marinucci, and Very Reverend Michael Roark.

There are six men from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia in the Ordination Class of 2012. Each of the newly ordained priests will be assigned to an Archdiocesan parish where they will serve as parochial vicars. A parochial vicar is a priest appointed by the Archbishop to assist the pastor of a parish.

###


Editor's Note: If you would like to receive a photograph of Father Whittingham electronically, please contact the Office for Communications at 215-587-3747 or email Jmartinez@adphila.org.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

the Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Holds Voucher Sunday Across The Five-county Region More Than 500 High School Students To Speak About The Need For School Vouchers And Expanded Eitc At Masses Throughout The Weekend

May 18, 2012

THE ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA HOLDS VOUCHER SUNDAY ACROSS THE FIVE-COUNTY REGION
More than 500 high school students to speak about the need for school vouchers and expanded EITC at Masses throughout the weekend



At parishes across the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, Catholic high school students, parents and teachers will speak about the need for school vouchers and expanded Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC) in the state of Pennsylvania. More than 500 students will stand up at the close of Mass on Saturday, May 19 and Sunday, May 20 to share their experiences with Catholic education, what it means to them to attend a Catholic school and express how school vouchers and expanded EITC could improve their lives and the lives of families in their community.


Following the announcement of the Blue Ribbon Commission's recommendation to close four Archdiocesan High Schools and Archbishop Chaput's subsequent decision to keep them open due to the immense support demonstrated by Catholics and the wider community, Catholics throughout the region have been motivated and empowered to speak out about the need for the state legislature to pass school voucher legislation and expanded EITC. From Archbishop Chaput's decision, Catholic families have recognized the importance of creating greater access to Catholic schools - schools that provide a values-driven education with an impressive track record of academic, athletic and co-curricular success in the region.


In his May 16, 2012 column entitled "Why Catholic Schools Are Worth Saving" Archbishop Chaput said, "The next three weeks are crucial. These coming days will determine the success or failure of school-choice efforts in our Commonwealth. Our Catholic schools and the many students who benefit from them depend on your voice. I ask you - I urge you - to please contact your state representative and state senator. Call them. Write them. E-mail them. Visit them. Press your legislators to bring this bill up and support vouchers and increased EITC funding. It's so important. Please speak up now."



And, Catholics are speaking up at the 1,073 Masses this weekend in the Archdiocese. The talks being delivered by Catholic high school students, parents and teachers will focus on the need for legislation to be introduced and passed, which would provide parents with the financial resources to select the best school for their child. Rooted in the belief that such legislation will not only spur enrollment for private, faith-based and parochial schools, speakers will also focus on how the legislation can prove that a "rising tide can lift all boats" by improving "failing schools" across the state.


Please visit http://catholicphilly.com/2012/05/archbishop-chaput/why-catholic-schools-are-worth-saving/ to read Archbishop Chaput's column, "Why Catholic Schools are Worth Saving."



Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Statement Regarding Monsignor Hugh P. Campbell

May 20, 2012

STATEMENT REGARDING
MONSIGNOR HUGH P. CAMPBELL


Monsignor Hugh P. Cambell, a retired priest of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, has been found not suitable for ministry following self-reported sexual abuse of a minor. Monsignor Campbell made this report in December 2011 at which time he was placed on administrative leave. Since then he has not been permitted to exercise his public ministry, wear clerical garb, or present himself publicly as a priest. This was reported to law enforcement.

Following Archbishop Chaput's determination of unsuitability for ministry, Monsignor Campbell has agreed to accept a supervised life of prayer and penance. An announcement regarding this situation was made this weekend at Saint Maximilian Kolbe Parish in West Chester, his most recent assignment prior to retirement. Counselors were present.

On May 4th, Archbishop Chaput announced resolutions to eight of the 26 cases of priests on administrative leave as a result of the February 2011 Grand Jury report. The announcement regarding Monsignor Campbell is not connected to those cases.

Monsignor Campbell is 77 years old. He was ordained in 1961. He served at the following parishes and schools: Nativity B.V.M., Media (1961-1966); Saint Agnes, West Chester (1966-1968); Newman Chaplain at West Chester University (1968-1986); Newman Chaplain at Chester County Hospital School of Nursing (1968-1986); Newman Chaplain at Cheyney University (1971-1986); Saint Maximilian Kolbe, West Chester (1986-2007). Monsignor Campbell retired in 2007 and moved to a private residence.

We recognize that this public notice may be painful to victims of sexual violence. If you need support or assistance, victim services are available to you through the Victim Assistance Office of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia at 1-888-800-8780 or philavac@adphila.org.

If you would like to report an allegation of sexual abuse, contact your local law enforcement agency and/or the Archdiocesan Office for Investigations at 1-800-932-0313.

###


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Update Regarding Monsignor George J. Mazzotta

May 20, 2012

UPDATE REGARDING
MONSIGNOR GEORGE J. MAZZOTTA


Monsignor George J. Mazzotta has been found unsuitable for ministry following a substantiated allegation of sexual abuse of a minor. Since May 2010 when the Archdiocese received the allegation and reported it to law enforcement, Monsignor Mazzotta has not been permitted to exercise his public ministry, wear clerical garb, or present himself publicly as a priest. Following Archbishop Chaput's determination of unsuitability for ministry, Monsignor Mazzotta has agreed to accept a supervised life of prayer and penance.

An announcement updating the situation regarding Monsignor Mazzotta was made this weekend at Stella Maris Parish in Philadelphia and Saint Madeline Parish in Ridley Park, his two most recent assignments. Counselors were present at Stella Maris Parish.

On May 4th, Archbishop Chaput announced resolutions to eight of the 26 cases of priests on administrative leave as a result of the February 2011 Grand Jury report. The announcement regarding Monsignor Mazzotta is not connected to those cases.

Monsignor Mazzotta is 73 years old. He was ordained in 1966. He served at the following parishes and schools: Saint Joseph, Downingtown (1966-1971); Epiphany of Our Lord, Philadelphia and Saint Maria Goretti High School (1971-1976); Saint Gabriel, Philadelphia (1976-1978); Saint Clement, Philadelphia (1978-1980); Saint Eugene, Primos (1980-1985); Saint Paul, Norristown (1985-1988); Saints Cosmas and Damian, Conshohocken (June 1988 - November 1988); Saint Robert Bellarmine, Warrington (1988-1990); Mother of Divine Grace, Philadelphia (1990-1997); Saint Madeline, Ridley Park (1997-2008); Stella Maris, Philadelphia (2008-2010).

We recognize that this public notice may be painful to victims of sexual violence. If you need support or assistance, victim services are available to you through the Victim Assistance Office of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia at 1-888-800-8780 or philavac@adphila.org.

If you would like to report an allegation of sexual abuse, contact your local law enforcement agency and/or the Office for Investigations at 1-800-932-0313.

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Editor's Note: For a copy of the initial statement regarding Monsignor Mazzotta in 2010 please visit http://archphila.org/press releases/pr001663.htm


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Honors Distinguished Scholars Of Catholic Secondary Schools 33rdannual Archdiocesan Academic Honors Convocation

May 21, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA HONORS DISTINGUISHED SCHOLARS
OF CATHOLIC SECONDARY SCHOOLS
33rdAnnual Archdiocesan Academic Honors Convocation


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., will celebrate a Mass at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul to honor Archdiocesan and private Catholic high school seniors for their academic excellence on:

Tuesday, May 22, 2012
6:30 p.m.
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103


The students, who are ranked in the top 3% of their senior class, will be honored for their academic success and dedication to their schoolwork. This year 169 students are included in this elite group according to their cumulative ranks at the end of the first semester of their senior year. This year approximately 4,000 seniors will graduate from Archdiocesan high schools.

Kathleen Logan, a student from Cardinal O'Hara High School in Springfield, Delaware County, is this year's student speaker. Miss Logan will address those in attendance after all students have received their medals.

Those individuals with asterisks after their names are in the Neumann Scholars Program. Initiated in 1995, this scholarship program identifies academically talented eighth grade students through an independently administered competitive examination and provides four year scholarships to attend one of seventeen Archdiocesan high schools.

2012 ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA ACADEMIC SCHOLARS
Schools are categorized below according to county:


BUCKS COUNTY
Archbishop Wood High School
Michael Heggan
Richard Rosenbaum*
Samantha Nichols
Brianne Haneman*
Brittany Barr*
Steven Buonomo
S. Curran Cornely
Richard Barnes

Conwell-Egan Catholic High School
Alicia A. Rusnak
Audrey M. Rusnak
Patrick T. Long
Bradliegh Navalsky
Carmela E. Straiton

Holy Ghost Preparatory School
Andrew T. King
Michael J. Mahan
Alec M. Pirritano
David E. Poncia

CHESTER COUNTY
Academy of Notre Dame de Namur
Kayleigh Elisabeth Makoid
Maria Lucia Seykora
Anna Marie Van Kula

Bishop Shanahan High School
Caroline M. Weyback-Liogier
Matthew S. Williamson*
Alexander M. Karlovitz*
Stephanie M. Lytle
Ann F. Gill
Anna Q. Shumard*
Casey E. McCusker*
Samantha L. Harrer
Rose L. Blanchard
Shane T. O'Connor*

Devon Preparatory School
Matthew D. Swatski
Chase B. Weber

Villa Maria Academy
Rachel L. Fulton
Madeline A. Iffert

DELAWARE COUNTY
Archbishop Carroll High School
Thomas M. Catullo
Daniel R. McCusker*
Sean T. Farrell
Megan E. Ziff
Michael C. Mattise
Jessica E. Lafferty
Henry J. Eichman
Margaret C. O'Brien
Julia C. Ciamaichelo

Cardinal O'Hara High School
Lisa Aquino
Michelle Daly
Caitlin Amanda Davis
Fiona Egan
Jennifer Glace
Mallory Anne Hotz
Kathleen Regina Logan*
Nicole M. McAlee*
Kerry O'Sullivan
Robert T. Schuster

Monsignor Bonner and Archbishop Prendergast High School
Alyson E. Stetyick*
Matthew J. Onimus
Danielle M. Beynon
Michael R. Proska
Elizabeth C. Green
Conor M. Egan
Jessica M. Borders
Nicholas Slavin
Kaitlyn Colleluori

MONTGOMERY COUNTY
Bishop McDevitt High School
Scott A. Stieritz*
Rachel V. Jenkins
Bridget E. Frasca
Mary Grace Estampa
Colleen M. Donnelly
Allan Jamil Terciano

Gwynedd-Mercy Academy High School
Francesca M. Crooks
Maria T. Mick
Emily A. Waschenko

Lansdale Catholic High School
Jane F. Bedrossian*
Lauren K. Sirianni
Andrew T. Hill*
Jordan T. Janinek
Madison R. Keefrider
Meghan L. Erwin

LaSalle College High School
Anthony R. Buonomo
Patrick J. Eble
John J. Fillenwarth
Oscar J. Gryn
Emre T. Karatas
Matthew R. Volpe
Francis W. Worthington

Merion Mercy Academy
Kerry R. Candeloro
Stephanie M. Furlong
Katrina C. Keating
Elizabeth A. Manning

Mount Saint Joseph Academy
Jaclyn A. McCadden
Veronica C. Beck
Maureen B. Gallagher
Colleen A. Tygh

Pope John Paul II High School
Lindsay N. Miller
Akshay G. Patel
Julia G. Yearwood
Shaun P. Gannon*
Rebecca Smith
Edmund C. Rothwein*

Saint Basil Academy
Jennifer D. Blake
Kiersten E. Moore
Taylor A. Wisniewski

PHILADELPHIA COUNTY
Archbishop Ryan High School
Daniel Robert Burke
Michael Anthony Giannone
Patrice McArdle
Jessica Lynn Phares
Christine A. McLaughlin
Rebecca Jones
Justin Q. SanJuan
Paige A. Haviland
Kelly L. Keaveney
Madeline Louise Clifford
John Michael Conway
Brendan Smith
Hayley Catherine Hanuscin

Father Judge High School for Boys
Francisco P. Goncalves*
John C. Landis
Thomas K. Fisher*
Michael W. Donahue*
Thomas P. Amon
Matthew R. Dettra
Evan M. Smith
Howard E. Stickley
James M. Cannon*
Daniel P. Gaughan

John W. Hallahan Catholic Girls' High School
Yvonne Tsang
Brandi McFarland
Alison Huang*
Gabrielle Sautner

Little Flower Catholic High School for Girls
Destiny Lee Marquez
Christine M. Lugrine
Christina Fisher
Megan Guy
Samantha Bastone
Brianna Gomez

Mercy Vocational High School
Priscilla Lugo
Krystal Cruz
Mailisa Crews

Nazareth Academy High School
Kimberly Feldman
Monica Sucharski
Melissa Dragun

Roman Catholic High School for Boys
Michael J. Dubinski*
Joseph J. McCloskey
Anthony J. Iannarelli, III
Nicholas A. Presel
Thien Nguyen Pham
David William Thomas, III
Eric T. VonHofen
Dominik Dos

Saint Hubert Catholic High School for Girls
Krista A. Patterson*
Kathleen M. MacFeeters
Emily A. Devlin
Melissa M. Grochowski
Casey L. Berner*

Saints John Neumann-Maria Goretti Catholic High School
Brittany C. Gatto
Ariana N. Cruz
Alexa L. Fecca
Briana M. Charlton
Gianna N. DeCarvalho
Luis A. Perez

Saint Joseph's Preparatory School
Sean P. Considine
Maguire L. Herriman
Kevin P. King
Timothy M. Koenig
Guiliano F. Pichini
Colin A. Sawyer
Evan T. Wescott

West Philadelphia Catholic High School
Andreas Lorenos
Kiara Jackson
Jaison Sebastion


# # #


Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocesan High Schools Graduate The Class Of 2012 Baccalaureate And Commencement Ceremonies Scheduled Throughout The Five Counties Of The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia

May 29, 2012

ARCHDIOCESAN HIGH SCHOOLS GRADUATE
THE CLASS OF 2012

Baccalaureate and Commencement Ceremonies scheduled throughout the five counties of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia's seventeen high schools are proud to be graduating approximately 4,000 young men and women this year. Catholic schools are committed to academic excellence, fostering the intellectual development and the growth of students while embracing the learning attitudes of the 21st century.

The 2012 Archdiocesan high school baccalaureate and commencement schedules are:


Archbishop John Carroll High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Wednesday, June 6, 2012 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: Saint Pius X Church; 220 Lawrence Road; Broomall, PA 19008 (Delaware County)

Commencement Exercises: Thursday, June 7, 2012 at 11:00 a.m.
Location: Cabrini College Cabrini College; 610 King of Prussia Road; Radnor, PA 19087 (Delaware County)
Presiding: Archbishop Charles Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.

Archbishop Ryan High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: The Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul; 18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway; Philadelphia, PA 19103

Commencement Exercises: Monday, June 4, 2012 at 11:00 a.m.
Location: The Liacouras Center; Temple University; 1776 North Broad Street Philadelphia, PA 19121
Presiding: Bishop Timothy Senior

Archbishop Wood High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Friday, June 1, 2012 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: Archbishop Wood High School Auditorium; 655 York Road; Warminster, PA 18974 (Bucks County)

Commencement Exercises: Monday, June 4, 2012 at 11:00 a.m.
Location: Villanova Pavilion; Villanova University; 800 East Lancaster Avenue; Villanova, PA 19085 (Delaware County)
Presiding: Bishop Michael Fitzgerald

Bishop McDevitt High
Baccalaureate Mass: Monday, June 4, 2012 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: The Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul; 18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway; Philadelphia, PA 19103

Commencement Exercises: Wednesday, June 6, 2012 at 9:00 a.m.
Location:Arcadia University; 450 South Easton Road; Glenside, PA 19038 (Montgomery County)
Presiding: Bishop Daniel Thomas

Bishop Shanahan High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Wednesday, June 6, 2012 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: Saint Elizabeth Church; Fellowship Road and Route 100; Uwchlan, PA 19480 (Chester County)

Commencement Exercises: Friday, June 8, 2012 at 2:00 p.m.
Location: Bishop Shanahan High School Auditorium; 220 Woodbine Road; Downingtown, PA 19335 (Chester County)
Presiding: Bishop Daniel Thomas

Cardinal O'Hara High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Tuesday, June 5, 2012 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: The Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul; 18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway; Philadelphia, PA 19103

Commencement Exercises: Wednesday, June 6, 2012 at 2:00 p.m.
Location: Villanova Pavilion; Villanova University; 800 East Lancaster Avenue; Villanova, PA 19085 (Delaware County)
Presiding: Bishop Michael Fitzgerald

Conwell-Egan Catholic High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Monday, June 4, 2012 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: Saint Michael the Archangel Church; 66 Levittown Parkway; Levittown, PA 19054 (Bucks County)

Commencement Exercises: Tuesday, June 5, 2012 at 10:30 a.m.
Location: Holy Family University, 9801 Frankford Avenue, Philadelphia, Pa 19114
Presiding: Bishop Michael Fitzgerald

Father Judge High School for Boys
Baccalaureate Mass: Tuesday, June 5, 2012 at 6:00 p.m.
Location: Our Lady of Ransom Church; Roosevelt Boulevard and Unruh Street; Philadelphia, PA 19149

Commencement Exercises: Wednesday, June 6, 2012 at 11:00 a.m.
Location: Liacouras Center; Temple University; 1776 North Broad Street, Philadelphia, PA 19121
Presiding: Dr. Richard McCarron

John W. Hallahan Catholic Girls' High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Monday, June 4, 2012 at 11:00 a.m. Commencement to follow
Location: The Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul; 18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway; Philadelphia, PA 19103
Presiding at Commencement Exercises: Ms. Mary Rochford

Saint Hubert Catholic High School for Girls
Baccalaureate Mass: Wednesday, June 6, 2012 at 9:00 a.m.
Location: Our Lady of Ransom Church; Roosevelt Boulevard and Unruh Street; Philadelphia, PA 19149

Commencement Exercises: Wednesday, June 6, 2012 at 5:00 p.m.
Location: Holy Family University; 9801 Frankford Avenue; Philadelphia, PA 19114
Presiding: Bishop Timothy Senior

Lansdale Catholic High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Monday, June 4, 2012 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: Saint Stanislaus Church; 51 Lansdale Avenue; Lansdale, PA 19446 (Montgomery County)

Commencement Exercises: Tuesday, June 5, 2012 at 10:00 a.m.
Location: National Shrine of Our Lady of Czestochowa; Ferry Road; Doylestown, PA18901 (Montgomery County)
Presiding: Bishop Robert Maginnis

Little Flower Catholic High Schools for Girls
Baccalaureate Mass: Thursday, June 7, 2012 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: The Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul; 18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway; Philadelphia, PA 19103

Commencement Exercises: Friday, June 8, 2012 at 2:00 p.m.
Location: Holy Family University; 9801 Frankford Avenue; Philadelphia, Pa 19114
Presiding: Bishop John McIntyre

Monsignor Bonner and Archbishop Prendergast Catholic High School
Archbishop Prendergast Division
Baccalaureate Mass: Wednesday, June 6, 2012 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: Holy Cross Church; Bishop and Springfield Roads; Springfield, PA 19064 (Delaware County)

Commencement Exercises: Thursday, June 7, 2012 at 10:00 a.m.
Location: Villanova Pavilion; Villanova University; 800 East Lancaster Avenue; Villanova, PA 19085 (Delaware County)
Presiding: Bishop Daniel Thomas

Monsignor Bonner and Archbishop Prendergast Catholic High School
Monsignor Bonner Division
Baccalaureate Mass: Thursday, June 7, 2012 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: Holy Cross Church; Bishop and Springfield Roads; Springfield, PA 19064 (Delaware County)

Commencement Exercises: Friday, June 8, 2012 at 10:00 a.m.
Location: Villanova Pavilion; Villanova University; 800 East Lancaster Avenue; Villanova, PA 19085 (Delaware County)
Presiding: Bishop John McIntyre

Saints John Neumann and Maria Goretti Catholic High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Thursday, June 7, 2012 at 3:00 p.m.
Location: The Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul; 18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway; Philadelphia, PA 19103

Commencement Exercises: Friday, June 8, 2012 at 9:00 a.m.
Location: Liacouras Center; Temple University; 1776 North Broad Street; Philadelphia, PA 19121
Presiding: Bishop Timothy Senior

Pope John Paul II High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Monday, June 4, 2012 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: Pope John Paul II High School Auditorium; 181 Rittenhouse Road; Royersford, PA 19468 (Montgomery County)

Commencement Exercises: Tuesday, June 5, 2012 at 10:30 a.m.
Location: Pope John Paul II High School Main Gymnasium; 181 Rittenhouse Road; Royersford, PA 19468 (Montgomery County)
Presiding: Bishop John McIntyre

Roman Catholic High School for Boys
Baccalaureate Mass: Friday, June 8, 2012 at 7:00 p.m. Commencement to follow
Location: The Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul; 18th Street and the Benjamin Franklin Parkway; Philadelphia, PA 19103
Presiding at Commencement Exercises: Bishop Daniel Thomas

West Philadelphia Catholic High School
Baccalaureate Mass: Thursday, May 31, 2012 at 7:00 p.m.
Location: Divine Mercy Church; 67th Street and Chester Avenue; Philadelphia, PA 19142

Commencement Exercises: Monday, June 4, 2012 at 10:30 a.m.
Location: West Philadelphia Catholic High School Auditorium; 4501 Chestnut Street; Philadelphia, PA 19139
Presiding: Bishop Daniel Thomas

# # #


Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: The Extraordinary Witness Of Ordinary People: Viva Cristo Rey!

May 29, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
THE EXTRAORDINARY WITNESS OF ORDINARY PEOPLE: VIVA CRISTO REY!


Earlier this week we celebrated Memorial Day. For most of us, the holiday informally marks the start of summer. Over the next three months families will take their vacations, the pace of life will slow a bit, and people will have a little more precious time to relax and restore their spirits.

The purpose of recreation is to renew us in body and soul; to give us time to think; to reconnect us with family and the gift of being alive. For me, that usually means a week of fishing with friends, catching up on a pile of good books and enjoying a few good movies.

And since all good things are meant to be shared, I can already recommend - in fact, enthusiastically recommend -- a film that no Catholic should miss this summer.

For Greater Glory opens in select theaters this Friday, June 1. Written, directed and acted with outstanding skill, it's the story of Mexico's Cristero War (also known as La Cristiada, 1926-29). Largely ignored until recently - even in Mexico - the war resulted from Mexico's atheist constitution of 1917, subsequent anti-religious legislation and fierce anti-clerical persecution by the government of President Plutarco Elias Calles, who came to power in 1924.

The Catholic response to the Calles regime first took the form of non-violent petitions, suspended religious services and economic boycotts. But bloody popular resistance broke out in 1926. By 1929, 50,000 Cristero rebels were fighting the federal government. A small number of priests took up arms with their people. More than 90,000 persons died in the fighting. In the process, the authorities murdered thousands of Catholic laypeople and dozens of priests.

Blessed Miguel Pro, a Jesuit priest, was executed without trial in 1927. Blessed Jose Sanchez del Rio, age 14, was shot to death for refusing to deny his faith in 1928. In both cases, the martyrs' last words were Viva Cristo Rey! (Long live Christ the King!) The Church has since honored dozens of other Mexican martyrs for their heroism during the Calles persecution.

By 1929, pressured by Cristero success and U.S. diplomacy, federal authorities agreed to ease some restrictions on the Church and end violent persecution. Mexico's bishops accepted the brokered peace. The Cristero rebellion slowly died out. But the government soon betrayed its promises. Brutal anti-religious policies renewed and continued.

Federal authorities murdered hundreds of former Cristero leaders and thousands of former Cristero fighters in reprisals. And the government continued its belligerence against the Church throughout the 1930s - a campaign of atheist violence and anti-religious hatred that provided the backdrop for two of Graham Greene's finest books: his travelogue, The Lawless Roads (1939), and arguably his greatest novel, The Power and the Glory (1940).

Of course, gripping history does not automatically translate into good drama. Too many films for the family and religious markets suffer from lots of good intentions, but a lack of resources, inadequate talent and weak professional skills.

For Greater Glory succeeds where so many similar films have failed. Led by Academy Award nominees Andy Garcia and Catalina Sandino Moreno, along with Oscar Isaac, Eva Longoria, Ruben Blades, Eduardo Verastegui and others, the cast is superb. And the writing gives them the kind of robust material they need to work with: strong dialogue, fully developed characters, vivid moral conflicts in a time of revolutionary violence, and a compelling story that never lags, thanks to the skilled directing of Dean Wright.

To describe this film as stirring or powerful would do it a disservice. For Greater Glory is much more than an exercise in piety; it's an extraordinary portrait of ordinary people struggling to defend their convictions. It's among the most absorbing films by any director or movie studio that I've seen in the past few years.

One of the hymns Cristeros sang as they went into battle had these words:

The Virgin Mary is our protector and defender when there is something to fear,
She will defeat the demons, crying "Long live Christ the King!"
She will defeat the demons, crying "Long live Christ the King!"
Soldiers of Christ let us follow the flag that the Cross shows the army of God!
Let us follow the flag, crying "Long live Christ the King!"


We Americans in 2012 live in a different land in a different time. We're blessed with freedoms the Cristeros could only imagine. But those freedoms depend on our willingness to defend them. Religious liberty is never guaranteed by anything but our own vigilance. Even in this country, contempt for religious faith, and especially the Catholic faith, is alive and well. For Greater Glory captures with memorable power and grace where that bigotry can lead -- and the cost of resisting it.

###


Editor's Note: Archbishop Chaput's columns are published regularly on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.htm.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput Welcomes Appointment Of New Denver Archbishop "a Coming Home For One Of Colorado's Finest Sons"

May 29, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT WELCOMES APPOINTMENT OF
NEW DENVER ARCHBISHOP
"A Coming Home for One of Colorado's Finest Sons"


"Archbishop-designate Aquila has been a trusted friend for many years. He's a leader of energy, intelligence and fidelity to the Church; a man of kindness, humor, many warm lay friendships and great fraternal love for his priests. His appointment is a 'coming home' for one of Colorado's finest sons. He was formed and ordained for the Archdiocese of Denver, so he knows Colorado very well. He experienced World Youth Day 1993 firsthand as a young priest. Those extraordinary days of grace with John Paul II have shaped his entire priestly ministry. He'll strengthen and build on the great work begun by his predecessor, Cardinal J. Francis Stafford, and the people of Colorado will very quickly find him a leader of character, clarity and good will. This is a great moment for the Catholic Church in Colorado."

+Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.
Archbishop of Philadelphia


# # #


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Announces Phoenixville Parish Mergers Resulting From Pastoral Planning Initiative

June 3, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE ANNOUNCES PHOENIXVILLE PARISH MERGERS RESULTING FROM
PASTORAL PLANNING INITIATIVE


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced today that Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has approved the recommendations of the Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee to merge parishes in Phoenixville. These mergers are the result of ongoing restructuring that will ultimately strengthen parish communities throughout the Archdiocese positioning them for future growth and sustainability. It is hoped that the result will be revitalized parishes throughout the Archdiocese that are better equipped to meet the spiritual and pastoral needs of future generations.

The recommendations and resulting mergers are an outcome of the Archdiocesan-wide Parish Pastoral Planning Area initiative, which began in 2011. Parishioners at all affected parishes learned of the final decisions through letters mailed to all registered parishioners as well as announcements made at all Masses this weekend.

The mergers announced today were based on a combination of factors, including, but not limited to, demographic shifts in Catholic populations, concentrated density of parishes in a limited geographic area, history of declining Mass attendance and sacramental activity, increasing economic challenges that threaten sustainability, a decrease in the availability of clergy to staff parishes, and a review of facilities.

Parishioners will attend daily and Sunday Mass at the church of the newly formed parish. The churches of the former parishes will remain open and be maintained as worship sites. At the discretion of the pastor, these sites will be utilized for weddings, funerals and feast days, as well as traditional and ethnic devotions for the duration of at least one year during the transition. Sunday Mass may also be celebrated at a worship site at the discretion of the pastor and the newly formed pastoral council.

All parish property, assets and debts of the former parishes will be assumed by the newly created parishes, which will also be responsible for the care of all sacramental records. The pastors from the merging parishes will form a transitional team made up of lay leaders from each of the merging parishes to assist in moving forward with building the new parish community.

The Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee, made up of lay persons, priests and Archdiocesan personnel, is examining all 267 parishes within the Archdiocese to gauge their viability and assess whether they possess the resources to accomplish their role in the mission of the Church and remain sustainable and vibrant faith communities. Parishes within each pastoral planning area will continue to carefully and thoughtfully examine their viability in order to make future recommendations. Additional parish announcements are expected in the fall of 2012 and the spring of 2013 and 2014.

Parish Area Pastoral Planning is designed to be as collaborative and consultative as possible. Its goal is to provide pastors, after consulting their parish leadership, with the opportunity to dialogue with members of the Strategic Planning Committee in providing joint recommendations to the Archbishop for growth and sustainability within their respective geographic areas. Additionally, in the majority of cases, the regional bishop and the dean meet with the pastors as well as their pastoral and finance councils to hear their concerns and receive their recommendations.

The Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee shared all final proposals with the Council of Priests and the College of Consultors for the review before final approval by the Archbishop.

Parish Announcements Effective July 1, 2012:

Phoenixville:
Holy Trinity Parish and Saint Mary of the Assumption Parish will merge at the location of and keep the name of Saint Mary of the Assumption Parish.

Sacred Heart Parish and Saint Ann Parish will merge at the location of and keep the name of Ann Parish.

Previous Announcements:

In mid-April, the Archdiocese announced the initial round of parish mergers resulting from the Parish Area Pastoral Planning Initiative in Coatesville, Germantown, and Manayunk. Additional information regarding those mergers can be found at http://archphila.org/press releases/pr001955.htm.

Future Announcements:

Also in mid-April, Archbishop Chaput directed that the merger plans for the following parishes receive more input, broader consultation and further study:

Germantown/Mount Airy: Holy Cross Parish, Saint Benedict Parish, Saint Madeleine Sophie Parish, and Saint Therese of the Child Jesus Parish will be studied further beginning in September 2012 with a final decision expected by the spring of 2013.

Editor's Note: The Archdiocese of Philadelphia is comprised of 44 Pastoral Planning Areas (PPAs). It is expected that the first 22 PPAs will complete the work of planning and implementation over the next two years and that additional two years will be required for the remainder of the PPAs. For more information on the Parish Area Pastoral Planning, please visit www.archphila.org.

Background on Phoenixville Parish Announcements Effective July 1, 2012


**A parish is always more than statistics as they do not represent the whole of parish life. They were only one part of the larger picture when developing recommendations for parish mergers. They do, however, provide a snapshot of a parish's sacramental activity and a gauge to project stability, growth or decline.**

Holy Trinity and Saint Mary of the Assumption Parishes (Phoenixville, Chester County)
Holy Trinity Parish and Saint Mary of the Assumption Parish will merge at the location of and keep the name of Saint Mary of the Assumption Parish. The two parishes are located directly across the street from one another. Holy Trinity Church will remain as a worship site. The pastor of the newly formed parish will be appointed with the regular priest personnel announcements in the coming weeks.

Holy Trinity Parish: 2006 2010
Infant Baptisms 6 5
Marriages 1 1
Weekend Mass attendance 446 373

Saint Mary of the Assumption Parish: 2006 2010
Infant Baptisms 26 18
Marriages 3 1
Weekend Mass attendance 513 511



Sacred Heart and Saint Ann Parishes (Phoenixville, Chester County)
Sacred Heart Parish and Saint Ann Parish will merge at the location of and keep the name of Saint Ann Parish. The two parishes are less than 0.75 miles away from each other. Sacred Heart Church will remain as a worship site. The pastor of the newly formed parish will be appointed with the regular priest personnel announcements in the coming weeks.

Sacred Heart Parish: 2006 2010
Infant Baptisms 19 14
Marriages 10 12
Weekend Mass attendance 565 477

Saint Ann Parish: 2006 2010
Infant Baptisms 96 79
Marriages 15 19
Weekend Mass attendance 1,359 1,334

Background on Future Parish Announcements


Holy Cross, Saint Benedict, Saint Madeline Sophie, and Saint Therese of the Child Jesus Parishes (West Oak Lane/East Mount Airy)
The merger plan for these parishes will be studied further to obtain more input and broader consultation. A final decision is expected by the spring of 2013.


###


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia To Host The 2015 World Meeting Of Families

June 3, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA TO HOST
THE 2015 WORLD MEETING OF FAMILIES


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. is in Milan today where Pope Benedict XVI announced during the World Meeting of Families that Philadelphia has been chosen as the site for the 2015 meeting. As part of the Milan event, Archbishop Chaput received the icon of the Holy Family, which is the symbol of The World Meeting of Families.

Archbishop Chaput said, "I am so grateful to the Holy Father that he has chosen Philadelphia and excited that we will host the 2015 World Meeting of Families. It's fitting that this gathering, which celebrates the cornerstone of society, will take place in America's cradle of freedom. The Holy Father's choice is a gift to the local Church in Philadelphia and to the whole nation.

The family is founded on a deep and loving union between one man and one woman for mutual support and the nurturing of children. This meeting in Philadelphia will be a wonderful opportunity to highlight the family as the basic evangelizing unit of the Church. Every effort to promote marriage and the family serves not only the Church, but also the common good."

Since its inception by Blessed John Paul II in 1992, the World Meeting of Families has sought to strengthen and defend the sacred bonds of marriage and family across the globe. It is customarily attended by the Holy Father, takes place every three years and is sponsored by the Holy See's Pontifical Council for the Family. The Archdiocese of Philadelphia eagerly anticipates hosting this significant event and continuing the good work done at the meeting this year in Milan.

# # #


Editor's Note: For background information on the World Meeting of Families please visit http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/benedict_xvi/travels/2012/index_milano_en.htm/.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

The Missionaries Of Charity Sisters To Receive The Keys And Sword Award

June 1, 2012

THE MISSIONARIES OF CHARITY SISTERS TO RECEIVE
THE KEYS AND SWORD AWARD


Bishop Daniel E. Thomas will be the main celebrant and homilist at a Mass honoring this year's Keys sand Sword Award recipients, the Missionaries of Charity, a community of religious women and men founded by Blessed Teresa of Calcutta. Each year, the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul, honors a group or a member of the community with the prestigious Keys & Sword Award, named in honor of Saints Peter and Paul, which recognizes their extraordinary commitment and selfless dedication in service to others.

Sunday, June 3, 2012
11:00 a.m.
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


The Missionaries of Charity Sisters have missions in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia in Norristown and Chester.

The Order of the Missionaries of Charity was established by Blessed Teresa of Calcutta in 1950. It consists of more than 5,000 members and is active in 147 countries. The Missionaries of Charity care for those most in need such as the homeless, orphaned children, the dying, the mentally ill, lepers, AIDS victims, the aged, and convalescents.

The Keys and Sword Award acknowledges individuals and groups whose actions reflect the Gospel values of faith, valor, selfless service, personal sacrifice and respect. Honorees are nominated and selected by a process of consultation involving clergy, cathedral parishioners, and members of the Archdiocesan community.

# # #


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-857-3747

Saint Hubert Catholic High School For Girls Rallies To Support School Choice Legislation

June 1, 2012

SAINT HUBERT CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL FOR GIRLS
RALLIES TO SUPPORT SCHOOL CHOICE LEGISLATION


Saint Hubert Catholic High School for Girls today rallied on the steps of the school at Cottman and Trresdale Avenues in support of the immediate proposal and passage of school choice legislation, specifically school vouchers and expanded Educational Improvement Tax Credit (EITC). As part of the rally, St. Hubert student Claire Alminde encouraged students - as well as parents, neighbors and families - to outreach to state legislators to let Harrisburg hear how important and transformative this type of legislation will be for local families. Highlighting her own positive experience, Alminde spoke to the need for all of those who love St. Hubert's - and all those who love Catholic education - to call, write, e-mail, Facebook and Tweet now in support of voucher legislation and expanded EITC.

Chair of the St. Hubert's Board of Directors, Kathleen Ott Lovell attended the rally as well, saying, "We rallied so often on these steps to save our school. And we did it! But even as Archbishop Chaput said St. Hubert's would remain open, we knew the fight had to continue. Today it does. As we rally on the steps again, in the warmth of spring, we ask our legislators for their help. It's not that St. Hubert's needs school choice legislation - our beloved students do. This is legislation to ensure the success of all future 'Bambies.' It's also about ensuring that all students have a fighting chance to succeed - and all families have the financial support to make the best choice available to them."

Representative Kevin Boyle (172nd Legislative District) also spoke to the crowd of nearly 500 students, teachers, administrators, parents and neighbors, announcing his support of voucher legislation and expanded EITC.

Jason Budd, Deputy Secretary for Catholic Education for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia said, "In the wake of Archbishop Chaput's decision to keep Monsignor Bonner/Archbishop Prendergast, Conwell-Egan Catholic, West Catholic and St. Hubert's open, it has become very clear to Catholics that school choice legislation is not only critical to the long-term sustainability of Catholic education but also, critical to the lifelong success of students in the five counties. We simply cannot continue to lose students to an educational system that determines success by zip code."

For more information about school choice legislation and to learn how to contact legislators regarding this important issue, please visit www.pacatholic.org.


# # #


Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-597-3747

Stand Up For Religious Freedom Rally At Independence Hall Concerned Citizens Will Gather To Defend Religious Freedom And Voice Opposition To The Hhs Mandate Violating Their Rights Of Conscience

June 7, 2012

STAND UP FOR RELIGIOUS FREEDOM RALLY AT
INDEPENDENCE HALL

Concerned citizens will gather to defend religious freedom and voice opposition to the
HHS mandate violating their rights of conscience


Stand Up for Religious Freedom Rallies will take place around the country this Friday including in Philadelphia. These religious freedom gatherings are in opposition to the Health and Human Services (HHS) mandate of January 20th. At that time, HHS reaffirmed a mandate that virtually all private health care plans must cover sterilization, abortion-causing drugs, and contraception.
Archbishop Charles Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has called it "bad law with very dangerous implications."

Catholics from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will join with other pro-life supporters tomorrow at the rally in Philadelphia.

Friday, June 8, 2012
12:00 p.m.
Independence Mall/Liberty Bell
520 Market Street
Philadelphia, PA 19106



Scheduled speakers include: Bishop Timothy Senior, Archdiocese of Philadelphia; Dr. Matthew Franck, Director of the William E. and Carol G. Simon Center on Religion and the Constitution at the Witherspoon Institute; Dr. Rosalie Mirenda, President of Neumann University; Mr. Ronald Rak, President and CEO of Saint Peter's Healthcare System; Dr. Bill Williams, Past President of the Catholic Medical Association; Lori Windham, Senior Counsel of the Becket Fund; Samuel Casey, Managing Director and General Counsel for the Jubilee Campaign's Law of Life Project; and Reverend Joseph Watkins, Pastor of Christ Evangelical Lutheran Church.

# # #


Editor's Note: For more information please contact Mr. Steven Bozza, Director of the Respect Life Office, at (215) 587-5661. 152 cities in 48 states will be hosting Stand Up for Religious Freedom Rallies on June 8th. The rally takes place on the 223rd anniversary of the day James Madison introduced the Bill of Rights to the United States Congress.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

2nd Biennial Joint Conference On The Use Of Psychology In The Admission Of Candidates To The Priesthood Archdiocese Of Philadelphia To Host International Gathering Of Vocation Directors And Psychologists

June 7, 2012

2ND BIENNIAL JOINT CONFERENCE ON THE USE OF PSYCHOLOGY
IN THE ADMISSION OF CANDIDATES TO THE PRIESTHOOD

Archdiocese of Philadelphia to host international gathering of vocation directors and psychologists


Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary and the Saint John Vianney Center of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will host the 2nd Biennial Joint Conference to further understanding of the Vatican document Guidelines on the Proper Use of Psychology in the Admission of Seminary and Religious Candidates to the Priesthood. The conference, A Necessary Conversation: A Gathering of Experts Part II, takes place June 10th-13th.

The faculty assembled for the four day meeting consists of nationally and internationally recognized experts in the fields of psychology, theology, religious leadership, vocation promotion, and formation. Keynote addresses will be delivered by Most Reverend Jose Gomez, Archbishop of Los Angeles; Dr. Richard Dana, Honorary Research Professor at the Regional Research Institute of Portland State University; and Dr. Fernando Ortiz, Director of the Counseling Center at Gonzaga University. Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will celebrate Mass for the participants on Monday, June 11th.

Keynote Address by Most Reverend José Gomez, Archbishop of Los Angeles
(Open to Media Coverage with Advance Arrangements)
Sunday, June 10, 2012
6:15 p.m.
Philadelphia Marriott-West Conshohocken
111 Crawford Avenue
West Conshohocken, PA 19428 (Montgomery County)


Vocation directors and formation directors as well as assessing and treating psychologists from around the world will gather to engage in dialogue focused on ensuring that the candidates studying in today's seminaries are best equipped to meet the moral, spiritual, and mental demands of the priesthood and build on the work of the 1st Joint Biennial Conference, held in 2010. Their efforts reflect recognition of the value of integrating proper psychological assessments as part of the human formation process in seminaries.

Father Gerard McGlone, S.J., Executive Director of Consultation, Education, and Research at Saint John Vianney Center said, "Research has shown that the more we increase dialogue among vocation directors, formation directors, and psychologists the more we enhance the quality of the candidates studying in our seminaries.** Those houses of formation which properly integrate psychological assessment into their human formation programs will produce priests who understand how to appropriately interact with both young people and adults. The end result is a major contribution toward ensuring that the Catholic Church in all of its forms is a safe environment."

The theme of this year's conference is "Inter-Cultural Competency." It was chosen based on research indicating that approximately 15% of all clergy and seminarians come from culturally diverse backgrounds and a desire to effectively respond to their unique needs. Individual sessions will center on African-American, Asian, European and Hispanic candidates for seminary formation.


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Editor's Note: Media are welcome to attend the keynote address by Archbishop Gomez on Sunday, June 10, 2012 or other particular talks. Advance arrangements are required through the Office for Communications at 215-587-3747. For more information on the 2nd Biennial Joint Conference please visit http://sjvcenter.org/sjvc_scs_conference_anecessaryconversation2_061012.php.


**The research referenced by Father McGlone is contained in the report prepared for the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, The Causes and Context of Sexual Abuse of Minors by Catholic Priests in the United States, 1950-2010, by the John Jay College Research Team. The full report can be found at http://bit.ly/USCCBJohnJayStudy.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Pope Benedict Xvi Names Philadelphia Priest Auxiliary Bishop Of The Diocese Of Rockville Centre Reverend Monsignor Nelson J. Perez Appointed An Auxiliary Bishop

June 7, 2012

POPE BENEDICT XVI NAMES PHILADELPHIA PRIEST
AUXILIARY BISHOP OF THE DIOCESE OF ROCKVILLE CENTRE

Reverend Monsignor Nelson J. Perez appointed an Auxiliary Bishop


It was announced today in Rome that Pope Benedict XVI has appointed Reverend Monsignor Nelson J. Perez as Auxiliary Bishop of the Diocese of Rockville Centre in New York. Bishop-elect Perez, age 50, was ordained a priest for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia in 1989. In addition to service at the parish level as a parochial vicar and pastor since that time, Bishop-elect Perez was also the Founding Director of the Catholic Institute for Evangelization and has been heavily involved in ministry to Hispanic Catholics.

Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. said, "Pope Benedict XVI's appointment of Bishop-elect Perez continues a long and generous tradition of service to the Universal Church by priests from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. It also demonstrates the Holy Father's confidence in Bishop-elect Perez, who has served our Archdiocese and its people with faithful devotion for many years. Bishop-elect Perez has a joyful and down-to-earth personality, an obvious love for the priesthood, and a tireless devotion to his ministry. Knowing how much he is loved by those he serves makes the sacrifice of losing him to another diocese all the greater.

As Bishop-elect Perez prepares to begin his episcopal ministry, I offer him heartfelt congratulations and pray that the Holy Spirit will strengthen him as a successor of the Apostles. I'm confident that he will be of great service to Bishop William Murphy and all of God's people in the Diocese of Rockville Centre. They are fortunate to receive such a gift from the Holy Father in the person of Bishop-elect Perez."


This morning, Bishop-elect Perez is at a news conference in Rockville Centre, where his appointment is being announced. He will be ordained a bishop on July 25, 2012 in Saint Agnes Cathedral in Rockville Centre by Bishop William F. Murphy. Archbishop Chaput will be a co-consecrator.

In a statement Bishop-elect Perez said, "I am humbled, but filled with great joy and gratitude to our Holy Father, Pope Benedict XVI, for calling me to serve the Church as a bishop. It is certainly not what I thought would happen to me on the day of my ordination. God's ways and thoughts are not ours, but I know and trust that His ways are always better than ours. I thank God for this awesome privilege. I also want to express my deep gratitude to Archbishop Charles Chaput for his wonderful support and fatherly care, especially upon my appointment. I come to all of you in the Diocese of Rockville Centre with a deep love for the Lord, His Church, and a profound love for the priesthood. I am filled with excitement and enthusiasm to get to know my brother priests, deacons, religious and the faithful of this great diocese and learn all I can to serve you, with the Grace of God, to the best of my ability."

Biographical Information

Nelson J. Perez was born in Miami, Florida, on June 16, 1961 to David and Emma Perez and is the brother of Dr. David Perez (deceased) and Luis Martin Perez. He attended P.S. Number 4 and Memorial High School in West New York, New Jersey. Bishop-elect Perez earned a Bachelor of Arts Degree from Montclair State University in 1983 and taught at Colegio La Piedad, a Catholic elementary school in Puerto Rico, prior to entering Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary. There he earned a Master of Arts and a Master of Divinity Degree in 1988 and 1989 respectively.

Bishop-elect Perez's first assignment after ordination to the priesthood was as parochial vicar of Saint Ambrose Parish, Philadelphia (1989-1993). He also served as Assistant Director of the Office for Hispanic Catholics (1990-1993); the Founding Director of the Catholic Institute for Evangelization (1993-2002); pastor of Saint William Parish, Philadelphia (2002-2009) and currently as pastor of Saint Agnes Parish, West Chester.

In 1998, he was named Chaplain to His Holiness, Pope John Paul II, with the title of Monsignor. In 2009, he was named a Prelate of Honor by Pope Benedict XVI.

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Editor's Note: A photo of Bishop-elect Perez is available upon request. Requests for photos should be emailed to kgavin@adphila.org. To read the full text of Bishop-elect Perez's statement please visit www.archphila.org. To learn more about the Diocese of Rockville Centre please visit www.drvc.org.

Bishop-elect Perez will celebrate Mass at Saint Agnes Carthedral in the Diocese of Rockville Centre today at 7:45 a.m. This mass will be streamed live at http://www.telecaretv.org/.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Nine Months Ago Today; And Some Changes For The Future

June 11, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
NINE MONTHS AGO TODAY; AND SOME CHANGES FOR THE FUTURE


Nine months ago today, on September 8, I was installed as Archbishop of Philadelphia. The months since then have seen a stream of challenges. Some of those challenges will be with us for months to come, and we have many problems yet to resolve. But it's also true that a great deal of good has been accomplished since last summer. We need to take confidence not only in God's love but in the many talented people, resources and opportunities God is steadily providing to us for rebuilding the life of our Church over the next decade. I've been very moved by the dedication of our clergy, religious and laypeople, and all of the kindness shown to me. These things have been a great experience of grace.

Yesterday the priests of the Archdiocese learned some news that I'd like to share with all our people. Several months ago Father Shaun Mahoney, rector of St. Charles Borromeo Seminary, approached me privately and expressed his thanks for the privilege of serving as rector. But he also shared his feeling that he had accomplished all he could in that ministry. He asked for a new pastoral assignment. I've been very pleased with Father Mahoney's service. I'll regret losing him in that position because of his personal commitment and the vital importance of the rector's work. I do understand his desire for a change, however. Today I am announcing his successor.

Bishop Timothy Senior has served Cardinal Justin Rigali and myself as moderator of the curia in effect, the chief operating officer of the Archdiocese -- with uncommon diligence and good will during one of the most painful times the Archdiocese of Philadelphia has ever experienced. He's done an outstanding job under pressure. I now need him in other work, equally demanding but also rewarding in a powerful way. Nothing is more fundamental to the renewal of the Church than forming good and holy priests. We need men who are equipped with the maturity, humility, zeal and pastoral skill to bring their people to Jesus Christ in today's challenging new environment. I believe Bishop Senior has the ability to lead that vital work at our seminary. I'm pleased to appoint him rector, and I'm grateful that he has accepted beginning July 2.

Replacing him as moderator of the curia will be Msgr. Daniel Kutys, currently pastor at Ss. Peter and Paul in West Chester, but with a long record of excellent service at the U.S. Catholic Bishops Conference. He has also served at the Archdiocesan Pastoral Center and most recently on the Blue Ribbon Commission that examined the future of Catholic education in our Archdiocese. We have a great many practical challenges ahead of us as a local Church. I look forward to Msgr. Kutys' leadership skill, his counsel and his help.

Underneath the hard shell of sins and burdens of the past decade, the Church in Philadelphia is a river of life. I've seen it in our parishes, our people and our priests. We'll get back to that clean water by the grace of God and our hard work in His service.

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Editor's Note: Archbishop Chaput's columns are published regularly on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.htm.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Praises Christiana Bill To Expand Eitc Funding And Create The Educational Improvement Scholarship Credit (eisc) As The 2011-2012 Legislative Session Draws To A Close, The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Urges The State Legislature In Harrisburg To Pass This Vital Bill, Which Provides School Choice To Parents And Students In Need Of Quality Education.

June 12, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA PRAISES CHRISTIANA BILL TO
EXPAND EITC FUNDING AND CREATE THE EDUCATIONAL
IMPROVEMENT SCHOLARSHIP CREDIT (EISC)


As the 2011-2012 legislative session draws to a close, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia urges the state legislature in Harrisburg to pass this vital bill, which provides school choice to parents and students in need of quality education.


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced today its full support of the Christiana bill (HB 2468), which was introduced this afternoon in Harrisburg by State Representative Jim Christiana (R-Beaver). This bill aims to expand the traditional Educational Improvement Tax Credit Program (EITC) by $25 million but more importantly, it aims to create the Educational Improvement Scholarship Credit (EISC). This new program would create a second pot of "opportunity scholarship" funds - beyond traditional EITC - that would infuse a new $100 million into school choice for September 2012. This new, second pot of funding would be particularly available to students within the bottom 15 percent of "failing schools" in the state and would be funded by tax-credited contributions targeted to designated opportunity scholarship organizations. This is critical as it will not take funds away from public schools in Pennsylvania.

"The Christiana bill is a just and necessary piece of legislation that targets the very real educational needs of so many students in the state of Pennsylvania," said Archbishop Charles Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. "This bill is the right thing for our children, and we have a duty to protect and enhance their future. Education is a key way of doing that, and this bill can bring so many students out of 'failing' schools and into environments -- including but not limited to Catholic schools -- that prepare students for lifelong success. The Archdiocese strongly supports this legislation and urges the Pennsylvania state legislature to pass this bill and to fund it fully at the proposed levels."

The Christiana bill includes elements of legislation that have already passed one or the other legislative chamber (Senate Bill 1 and House Bill 1330) and draw bi-partisan support. Some of the strongest opponents to school vouchers - a program that the Archdiocese also backs - are willing to support the Christiana bill.

The support of the Archdiocese comes at the close of an academic year that saw Archbishop Chaput honor appeals from hundreds of students and families, and choose to keep four financially distressed Archdiocesan high schools open. But in making this hard decision, the Archbishop urged legislators to enact school choice legislation to prevent future closings of Archdiocesan schools - a setback that would add to the financial burden of the general public. In recent months, the Archbishop's call to legislators has been joined by Catholics across the Philadelphia region through Voucher Sunday, which had more than 500 Archdiocesan high school students passionately advocating for their education in local parishes, rallies at City Hall and at local high schools as well as a grassroots effort that resulted in thousands of phone calls, e-mails and letters sent to local legislators. These efforts continue in full as the state legislature approaches the close of its session on June 30.

For a brief overview, including a list of co-sponsors for HB2468 please visit: http://www.legis.state.pa.us/

For more information about school choice legislation and to learn how to contact legislators regarding this important issue please visit www.pacatholic.org.

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Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Newly Proposed Saint Blaise Regional School Will Not Open Due To Low Enrollment

June 18, 2012

NEWLY PROPOSED SAINT BLAISE REGIONAL SCHOOL
WILL NOT OPEN DUE TO LOW ENROLLMENT


The proposed Saint Blaise Regional School in the Manayunk section of Philadelphia will not be able to open in September 2012 as previously planned. Saint Blaise Regional School was formed out of the Blue Ribbon Commission recommendations announced in January 2012 to merge Saint Bridget Parish School and Holy Child Regional School into one school serving the families of East Falls and Manayunk.

Enrollment as of Friday, June 15, 2012 was 155 students. The quality Catholic education that school families deserve could not be provided unless enrollment reached at least 250 students. The original deadline for registration was March 30, 2012 and had been extended until June 15, 2012. The parishes do not have the resources needed to cover the financial costs which would be incurred with an enrollment of less than 250 students. The sponsoring parishes would not have been able to afford teachers' salaries or to administer the school with the programs promised.

To encourage registration, pastors from the sending parishes communicated with families on several occasions through school reach messages, emails and letters. The pastors sent a letter on June 8, 2012 noting that the status of the merger was at a critical point and urging parents to register their children if they had not done so. Enrollment did not increase to the needed level. In a letter, which families were to receive today, the pastors conveyed their deep regret that the school could not open and assured parents who had previously registered their children that seats would be available in neighboring Catholic schools. Every possible effort is being made to assist those who would have been employed at the school next year.

School families will be welcomed and may register their child at the following parish schools in the surrounding area: Immaculate Heart of Mary in Roxborough; Our Mother of Consolation in Chestnut Hill; Saint Philip Neri in Lafayette Hill, Montgomery County; Saint Genevieve in Flourtown, Montgomery County; Saint Margaret in Narberth, Montgomery County and Saint Francis Xavier in Philadelphia.

Saint Bridget Parish School's enrollment for the current year is 198 students down from 224 students in 2005-2006. The current enrollment for Holy Child Regional School is 213 students down from 419 students in the 2005-2006 school year. Holy Child Regional School was formed in 2005 out of the merger of Holy Family, Saint Lucy and Saint Mary the Assumption Parish Elementary Schools. Within one year Saint John the Baptist and Saint Josaphat Parish Schools had joined the regional school.

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Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

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Bishop Blair Responds To Concerns About The Vatican's Doctrinal Assessment And Religious Women

June 18, 2012

Bishop Blair Responds to Concerns About the Vatican's Doctrinal Assessment and Religious Women

Below is the text of a column written by Bishop Leonard Blair of the Diocese of Toledo, Ohio. It was originally published in the Catholic Chronicle on June 8, 2012.

When you are in a position of leadership or authority, it is a great cross sometimes to know firsthand the actual facts of a situation and then have to listen to all the distortions and misrepresentation of the facts that are made in the public domain.

Having conducted the doctrinal assessment of the entity known as the Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR), I can only marvel at what is now being said, both within and outside the Church, regarding the process and the recent steps taken by the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith (CDF) to remedy significant and longstanding doctrinal problems connected with the activities and programs of the LCWR.

The biggest distortion of all is the claim that the CDF and the bishops are attacking or criticizing the life and work of our Catholic sisters in the United States. One report on the CBS evening news showcased the work of a Mercy Sister who is a medical doctor in order to compare her to the attack that she and sisters like her are supposedly being subjected to by authoritarian bishops. The report concludes with a statement that the bishops impose the rules of the Church but the sisters carry on the work of the Church.
Unless the sister in question is espousing and/or promoting positions contrary to Catholic teaching-and there was no reason given to think that she is-then the Holy See's doctrinal concerns are not directed at her or at the thousands of religious sisters in our country like her to whom we all owe a debt of gratitude for all that they do in witness to the Gospel.

What the CDF is concerned about, as I indicated, is the particular organization known as the LCWR. Its function, responsibilities and statutes were all originally approved by the Holy See, to which it remains accountable. While it is true that the member communities of the LCWR represent most of the religious sisters in the United States, that does not mean that criticism of the LCWR is aimed at all the member religious communities, much less all sisters.

The word "investigation" is often used to describe the work that I carried out on behalf of the CDF. "Investigation" suggests an attempt to uncover things that might not be known. In reality, what the CDF commissioned was a doctrinal "assessment," an appraisal of materials which are readily available to anyone who cares to read them on the LCWR website and in other LCWR published resources. The assessment was carried out in dialogue with the LCWR leadership, both in writing and face-to-face, over several months.

The fundamental question posed to the LCWR leadership as part of the assessment was simply this: What are the Church's pastors to make of the fact that the LCWR constantly provides a one-sided platform-without challenge or any opposing view-to speakers who take a negative and critical position vis-a-vis Church doctrine and discipline and the Church's teaching office?
Let me cite just a few of the causes for concern.

In her LCWR keynote address in 1997, Sr. Sandra Schneiders, IHM proposed that the decisive issue for women religious is the issue of faith: "It can no longer be taken for granted that the members [of a given congregation] share the same faith."

Ten years later, in an LCWR keynote speech, Sr. Laurie Brink, O.P. spoke of "four different general 'directions' in which religious congregations seem to be moving." She said that "not one of the four is better or worse than the others." One of the directions described is "sojourning," which she says "involves moving beyond the Church, even beyond Jesus. A sojourning congregation is no longer ecclesiastical. It has grown beyond the bounds of institutional religion." This kind of congregation "in most respects is Post-Christian." She concludes by characterizing as "a choice of integrity, insight and courage" the decision to "step outside the Church" already made by one group of women religious.

Fr. Michael H. Crosby, OFMCap, a keynote speaker at the joint LCWR-CMSM assembly in 2004, lamented the fact that "we still have to worship a God that the Vatican says 'wills that women not be ordained.' That god is literally 'unbelievable.' It is a false god; it cannot be worshiped. And the prophet must speak truth to that power and be willing to accept the consequence of calling for justice, stopping the violence and bringing about the reign of God."

The LCWR's Systems Thinking Handbook describes a hypothetical case in which sisters differ over whether the Eucharist should be at the center of a special community celebration. The problem is that some of the sisters object to "priest-led liturgies." The scenario, it seems, is not simply fictitious, for some LCWR speakers also mention the difficulty of finding ways to worship together as a faith community. According to the Systems Thinking Handbook this difficulty is rooted in differences at the level of belief, but also different mental models-the "Western mind" and the "Organic mental model." These, rather than Church doctrine, are offered as tools for the resolution of the case.

LCWR speakers also explore themes like global spirituality, the new cosmology, earth-justice and eco-feminism in ways that are frequently ambiguous, dubious or even erroneous with respect to Christian faith. And while the LCWR upholds Catholic social teaching in some areas, it is notably silent when it comes to two of the major moral challenges of our time: the right to life of the unborn, and the God-given meaning of marriage between one man and one woman.

Are these examples indicative of the thinking of all religious sisters in the United States whose communities are members of the LCWR? Certainly not.

Serious questions of faith undoubtedly arise among some women religious, as the LCWR maintains. However, is it the role of a pontifically recognized leadership group to criticize and undermine faith in church teaching by what is said and unsaid, or rather to work to create greater understanding and acceptance of what the Church believes and teaches?

Those who do not hold the teachings of the Catholic Church, or Catholics who dissent from those teachings, are quick to attack the CDF and bishops for taking the LCWR to task. However, a person who holds the reasonable view that a Catholic is someone who subscribes to the teachings of the Catholic Church will recognize that the Catholic Bishops have a legitimate cause for doctrinal concern about the activities of the LCWR, as evidenced by a number of its speakers and some of its resource documents.

A key question posed by the doctrinal assessment had to do with moving forward in a positive way. Would the LCWR at least acknowledge the CDF's doctrinal concerns and be willing to take steps to remedy the situation? The response thus far is exemplified by the LCWR leadership's choice of a New Age Futurist to address its 2012 assembly, and their decision to give an award this year to Sr. Sandra Schneiders, who has expressed the view that the hierarchical structure of the church represents an institutionalized form of patriarchal domination that cannot be reconciled with the Gospel.

This situation is now a source of controversy and misunderstanding, as well as misrepresentation. I am confident, however, that if the serious concerns of the CDF are accurately represented and discussed among all the sisters of our country, there will indeed be an opening to a new and positive relationship between women religious and the Church's pastors in doctrinal matters, as there already is in so many other areas where mutual respect and cooperation abound.

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Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

>Nutritional Development Services To Hold Annual Blessing Of The Summer The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Kicks Off Summer Meals Program

June 19, 2012

NUTRITIONAL DEVELOPMENT SERVICES
TO HOLD ANNUAL BLESSING OF THE SUMMER

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia kicks off Summer Meals Program


Nutritional Development Services (NDS) of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia is sponsoring its annual
Blessing of the Summer to kick off its Summer Meals Program. In the summer of 2011, NDS operated close to 500 summer feeding sites and served approximately 991,000 meals. NDS partners with dedicated community leaders to provide service to families and contribute to the health and well-being of children in Philadelphia and the surrounding area.

Monsignor Daniel Sullivan, President of the NDS Board, will preside over the blessing at Saint Jerome Parish School in Northeast Philadelphia.

Wednesday, June 20, 2012
11:45 a.m.
Immediately Followed by Lunch
Saint Jerome School
3031 Stamford Street
Philadelphia, PA 19136


The Summer Meals Program is federally funded, operated nationally by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and administered by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. This year the NDS Summer Meals Program runs from June 18th through August 24th. Children participating in the program are invited to enter a Creative Writing Contest and a Poster Contest titled Piece for Peace, which promotes peace in the community.

Participating sites offer children lunch and a choice of breakfast or a snack. Most Philadelphia and many suburban neighborhoods qualify for the program.

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Editor's Note: To sign up for the Summer Meals Program or for more information on Nutritional Development Services please call Anne Ayella at 215-895-3470.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

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Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Taking The Difficult Steps On The Road To Renewing The Church

June 21, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
TAKING THE DIFFICULT STEPS ON THE ROAD TO RENEWING THE CHURCH


Last month, at my request, the Archdiocese published a financial report that was as comprehensive as possible. In the years ahead, that annual report will improve and become even more thorough. After the past decade of anger and confusion in the Church, Philadelphia Catholics want a life of faith where their children are safe and their spirits are nourished. For as long as God gives me time as your bishop, I promise to work to make that happen.

I know that few things in the Church seem less fertile than talk about money. What finally matters to all of us is the welfare - including the spiritual welfare -- of the people we love. Yet as every adult knows, no family can survive for long without using its resources wisely. The zeal to do good things is a natural part of the Christian vocation. But it needs to be anchored in reality and guided by prudence. If we act otherwise, we ignore sound stewardship and create bigger and more painful difficulties for the future, because we can't quick-fix our way out of problems that we behave ourselves into.

Earlier today, June 21, I approved a staff reduction of more than 40 employees connected with the Archdiocesan Pastoral Center. These are good men and women who have served the Church well. I took this action with great reluctance, as one of several urgently needed steps to restore our Church to a healthy footing. Every departing employee has the respect and sincere gratitude of the Archdiocese and will be treated with maximum consideration, including appropriate severance and counseling.

At the start of our budget planning for Fiscal 2013, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia faced an expected shortfall of more than $17 million between our projected expenses and projected income. Please understand that this shortfall does not include the extraordinary legal and other professional expenses of the past year. As burdensome as those extra costs have been, the much more troubling fact is that the Archdiocese has -- for many years -- covered the expense of its many good ministries with growing deficits. These serious deficits have then been made whole with the sale of assets or the drawing down of investments. This is sometimes necessary in an emergency. But it can't be justified or sustained as a normal way of operating.

Despite our best efforts, and even with very significant budget and staffing adjustments, the Archdiocese will still face a budget deficit in Fiscal Year 2013 of more than $5 million. This can't continue, and it won't continue, and I've asked our financial staff and Archdiocesan Finance Council to do everything required by best business standards to balance our local Church's budget by Fiscal Year 2014.

At the same time, we have an on-going duty to serve the pastoral and sacramental needs of our own people and the poor of the wider community; to provide support for victims of sexual abuse; to protect children and families; and to defend the Catholic community in the public square. All of these obligations are important. We will work hard to meet each of them.

As I've said many times, and as I've meant from my heart since arriving in Philadelphia: Thank you for your love of God and generous good will over these past 10 months in the face of so many demanding challenges for our Church. And please, in a special way, keep our departing employees and their families in your prayers.

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Editor's Note: Archbishop Chaput's columns are published regularly on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.htm.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Announces Steps To Cut Projected Deficit Plan Will Stabilize Central Office Operation, Ensure Long-term Financial Stability And Position The Archdiocese For Future Growth

June 21, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA ANNOUNCES STEPS
TO CUT PROJECTED DEFICIT

Plan will stabilize central office operation, ensure long-term financial stability and position the Archdiocese for future growth


Today, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced steps aimed at cutting a projected deficit exceeding $17 million for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2012. The Archdiocesan Pastoral Center, comprised of the Office for Financial Services and including more than 40 ministry programs and offices, has operated with significant deficits for many years. The restructuring - approved by Archbishop Chaput after a comprehensive review of operations -- includes a staff reduction involving 45 positions, the merging and consolidation of 19 offices and/or ministries, the ceasing of The Catholic Standard & Times and the suspension of Phaith Magazine. The Archdiocese is also planning no raises for remaining staff in the next fiscal year. These steps will sharply reduce the expected deficit, provide better stewardship for operations, and help ensure improved financial health.

The extraordinary legal and professional costs of the past 16 months, while burdensome, played little role in the current budget decisions, according to the Archbishop. The financial and organizational difficulties facing the Archdiocese are structural and have been building for many years. They can no longer be sustained, and all of the Church's works must return to a spirit of careful stewardship.

All employees released in the staff reduction will receive 60 days of pay in lieu of notice and full-time employees will be eligible for one week of severance pay for each year of completed service. All affected employees will also be paid for accrued and unused vacation time. In addition to severance, the Archdiocese will also provide medical coverage through September 30 and departing employees will be eligible for a COBRA-like benefit for the six months following. The Archdiocese of Philadelphia will also contract with a third party firm to provide job counseling and career services, and protocols are in place to match displaced employees' skills with openings in other offices, including Catholic Social Services and Catholic Healthcare Services, which were not impacted by this restructuring and maintain separate budgets.

"These are good men and women who have served the Church well," said Archbishop Charles Chaput, O.F.M Cap. "I take this action with great reluctance, as one of several urgently needed steps to restore the local Church to a healthy financial footing. Every departing employee has the sincere gratitude of the Archdiocese and will be treated with maximum consideration."

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia Office of Financial Services examined all of its ministries and offices in an effort to look for cost saving opportunities. It has worked with vendors to renegotiate contracts, has ended non-essential subsidies and is implementing many cost cutting initiatives in the coming months, but these efforts were not enough to close the budget gap. Through careful consideration, it was determined that some ministries will be combined into single offices with reduced staffing.

Under the restructuring plan, Family Life and Respect Life/Deaf Apostolate plus Formation of the Laity will merge into the Office of Life, Family & Laity, and existing Office for Youth and Young Adults (OYYA) programs will merge into the Office of Catholic Education and Office of Catechetical Formation. These programs include the CYO Program which will continue operating with no change on the local level. Additionally, existing programs operating through the Hispanic Ministry will merge into the Office for Hispanic Catholics. Offices that will remain in place with reductions to staff include, the Secretariat for Evangelization, the Permanent Diaconate Office and the Vocations Office for Diocesan Priesthood. The restructuring plan also called for the closure of some ministries and offices. Ministries that have been eliminated include Camp Overbrook and the Saint Peter Claver Center for Evangelization. The Catholic Institute for Evangelization site will close and the Institute will continue its work in another form, holding courses and programs in various locations around the Archdiocese. In addition, The Catholic Standard & Times will cease production and Phaith Magazine will be suspended, with CatholicPhilly.com continuing to serve as the official news outlet of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

"We are committed to doing the work of Jesus Christ and earning the confidence of the faithful and the community we serve," said Archbishop Chaput. "We have an on-going duty to serve the pastoral and sacramental needs of our own people and the poor of the wider community; to provide support for victims of sexual abuse; to protect children and families; and to defend the Catholic community in the public square. All of these obligations are important. We will work hard to meet each of them."

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Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Reacts To Verdict In Trial Of Monsignor William Lynn

June 22, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE REACTS TO VERDICT
IN TRIAL OF MONSIGNOR WILLIAM LYNN



This has been a difficult time for all Catholics, especially victims of sexual abuse. The lessons of the last year have made our Church a more vigilant guardian of our people's safety. The Archdiocese of Philadelphia is on a journey of reform and renewal that requires honesty and hope. We are committed to providing support and assistance to parishioners as they and the Church seek to more deeply understand sexual violence, and to create an environment that is safe and welcoming to all, including past victims.

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia offers a heartfelt apology to all victims of clergy sexual abuse. Now and in the future, the Church will continue to take vigorous steps to ensure safe church environments for all the faithful in Philadelphia.

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Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocesan Schools Receive National Honors For Math Achievement Students, Teachers And Families Celebrate Winners Of The First In Math® Competition

June 26, 2012

ARCHDIOCESAN SCHOOLS RECEIVE NATIONAL HONORS FOR
MATH ACHIEVEMENT

Students, Teachers and Families Celebrate Winners of the First in Math® Competition


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia is proud to announce that 23 Archdiocesan schools have received national recognition for their excellent performance in the math competition First in Math®. The online math competition is designed to help students practice and advance their math fluency by competing against students nationwide. Participants include students from public, private and parochial schools.

Four Archdiocesan students among the 1.4 million who competed, placed among the top 100 competitors in the nation. Of those four winners, 4th grade student Josephine Nguyen of Saint William School, Philadelphia, placed first in the country.

Nationally, more than 4,000 schools competed in First in Math® this year. Twenty-five classes within Archdiocesan schools ranked in the top 10 among those in grades K - 8 nationally. At the state level, 41 Archdiocesan schools received top honors.

Archdiocesan Schools Ranked Among Top 100 National Schools in First in Math® include:
- Saint Francis de Sales School, Philadelphia
- Saint Pius X School, Broomall, Delaware County
- Saint Charles Borromeo School, Bensalem, Bucks County
- Saint Dorothy School, Drexel Hill, Delaware County
- Saint Jude School, Chalfont, Montgomery County
- SS. Simon and Jude School, West Chester, Chester County
- Saint Dominic School, Philadelphia
- DePaul Catholic School, Philadelphia
- Satin Martin of Tours School, Philadelphia
- Saint Agnes - Sacred Heart School
- Saint Eugene School, Primus, Delaware County
- Immaculate Conception
- Saint William School, Philadelphia
- Saint Rose of Lima School, North Wales, Montgomery County
- Saint Raymond School, Philadelphia
- Notre Dame de Lourdes, Swarthmore, Delaware County
- Saint Laurence School, Upper Darby, Delaware County
- Saint Christopher School, Philadelphia
- Immaculate Heart of Mary School, Philadelphia
- Saint Monica School
- Saint Bede the Venerable School, Holland, Bucks County

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Editor's Note: For more information about schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, please visit www.catholicschools-phl.org.


Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Statement Of Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.f.m. Cap. On The Passage Of House Bill 761 (expansion Of Eitc And Creation Of Eitc 2)

July 1, 2012

STATEMENT OF ARCHBISHOP CHARLES J. CHAPUT, O.F.M. CAP.
ON THE PASSAGE OF HOUSE BILL 761
(EXPANSION OF EITC AND CREATION OF EITC 2)


"Today is an important day for students across Pennsylvania and the hardworking parents and guardians who sacrifice so much to provide their children with an education that will prepare them for the future. Our state legislature has taken the first critical step in giving all students a chance for lifelong success by giving families a real educational choice with the passage of House Bill 761.

There are many legislative leaders to thank in helping to pass this piece of legislation. Specifically, I want to express my gratitude to Governor Tom Corbett, Lieutenant Governor Jim Cawley as well as Senator Tony Williams and Representative Mike Vereb, who championed school choice legislation throughout the spring. I also wish to thank Senators Dominic Pileggi, Jeffrey Piccola and Vincent Hughes, Representative Jim Christiana, Speaker Sam Smith, Majority Leader Mike Turzai as well as Representatives Mike Gerber, Brendan Boyle and Kevin Boyle for their ongoing support and efforts. The entire Pennsylvania State Legislature is to be commended for identifying and securing the funds that allowed House Bill 761 to pass both chambers late last night. This expansion of EITC by $25 million and the creation of EITC 2 at $50 million is a strong first step toward what we need to help secure Catholic education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and to provide families across our Commonwealth with real choices in how to best educate their children.

I am also appreciative that our local legislators in the five-county Philadelphia region acted upon the unprecedented outpouring of support for this legislation by Catholics in the Archdiocese. Whether it was our youngest voters - in our high school students - passionately advocating for their education in our parishes or student rallies at our high schools or thousands of phone calls, e-mails and letters sent to local legislators, the Catholic voice was heard in Harrisburg and action was rightfully taken.

While there is still much more to be done legislatively on the issue of school choice, the passage of this legislation will immediately help our state's most vulnerable students - those within the bottom 15 percent of 'failing schools' as well as those with physical and learning disabilities - by providing additional funds to their families through 'opportunity scholarships.' With our four elementary schools for special education, the Bonaventure and Drexel Programs at the high school level to address learning disabilities and our strong elementary and secondary systems, we welcome the opportunity to serve even more students through EITC and now, EITC 2."

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Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Homily: National Closing Mass Of The Fortnight For Freedom Basilica Of The National Shrine Of The Immaculate Conception, Washington, Dc

July 4, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S HOMILY:
NATIONAL CLOSING MASS OF THE FORTNIGHT FOR FREEDOM

Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, Washington, DC


Paul Claudel, the French poet and diplomat of the last century, once described the Christian as "a man who knows what he is doing and where he is going in a world [that] no longer [knows] the difference between good and evil, yes and no. He is like a god standing out in a crowd of invalids . . . He alone has liberty in a world of slaves."

Like most of the great writers of his time, Claudel was a mix of gold and clay, flaws and genius. He had a deep and brilliant Catholic faith, and when he wrote that a man "who no longer believes in God, no longer believes in anything," he was simply reporting what he saw all around him. He spoke from a lifetime that witnessed two world wars and the rise of atheist ideologies that murdered tens of millions of innocent people using the vocabulary of science. He knew exactly where forgetting God can lead.

We Americans live in a different country, on a different continent, in a different century. And yet, in speaking of liberty, Claudel leads us to the reason we come together in worship this afternoon.

Most of us know today's passage from the Gospel of Matthew. What we should, or should not, render unto Caesar shapes much of our daily discourse as citizens. But I want to focus on the other and more important point Jesus makes in today's Gospel reading: the things we should render unto God.

When the Pharisees and Herodians try to trap Jesus, he responds by asking for a coin. Examining it he says, "Whose image is this and whose inscription?" When his enemies say "Caesar's," he tells them to render it to Caesar. In other words, that which bears the image of Caesar belongs to Caesar.

The key word in Christ's answer is "image," or in the Greek, eikon. Our modern meaning of "image" is weaker than the original Greek meaning. We tend to think of an image as something symbolic, like a painting or sketch. The Greek understanding includes that sense but goes further. In the New Testament, the "image" of something shares in the nature of the thing itself.

This has consequences for our own lives because we're made in the image of God. In the Greek translation of the Old Testament, the same word, eikon, is used in Genesis when describing the creation. "Let us make man in our image, after our likeness" says God (Gen 1:26). The implication is clear. To be made in the image of God is more than a pious slogan. It's a statement of fact. Every one of us shares -- in a limited but real way -- in the nature of God himself. When we follow Jesus Christ, we grow in conformity to that image.

Once we understand this, the impact of Christ's response to his enemies becomes clear. Jesus isn't being clever. He's not offering a political commentary. He's making a claim on every human being. He's saying, "render unto Caesar those things that bear Caesar's image, but more importantly, render unto God that which bears God's image" -- in other words, you and me. All of us.

And that raises some unsettling questions: What do you and I, and all of us, really render to God in our personal lives? If we claim to be disciples, then what does that actually mean in the way we speak and act?

Thinking about the relationship of Caesar and God, religious faith and secular authority, is important. It helps us sort through our different duties as Christians and citizens. But on a deeper level, Caesar is a creature of this world, and Christ's message is uncompromising: We should give Caesar nothing of ourselves. Obviously we're in the world. That means we have obligations of charity and justice to the people with whom we share it. Patriotism is a virtue. Love of country is an honorable thing. As Chesterton once said, if we build a wall between ourselves and the world, it makes little difference whether we describe ourselves as locked in or locked out.

But God made us for more than the world. Our real home isn't here. The point of today's Gospel passage is not how we might calculate a fair division of goods between Caesar and God. In reality, it all belongs to God and nothing - at least nothing permanent and important - belongs to Caesar. Why? Because just as the coin bears the stamp of Caesar's image, we bear the stamp of God's image in baptism. We belong to God, and only to God.

In today's second reading, St. Paul tells us, "Indeed religion" -- the RSV version says "godliness" - "with contentment is great gain. For we brought nothing into the world, just as we shall not be able to take anything out of it." True freedom knows no attachments other than Jesus Christ. It has no love of riches or the appetites they try to satisfy. True freedom can walk away from anything -- wealth, honor, fame, pleasure. Even power. It fears neither the state, nor death itself.

Who is the most free person at anything? It's the person who masters her art. A pianist is most free who -- having mastered her instrument according to the rules that govern it and the rules of music, and having disciplined and honed her skills -- can now play anything she wants.

The same holds true for our lives. We're free only to the extent that we unburden ourselves of our own willfulness and practice the art of living according to God's plan. When we do this, when we choose to live according to God's intention for us, we are then -- and only then -- truly free.

This is the freedom of the sons and daughters of God. It's the freedom of Miguel Pro, Mother Teresa, Maximillian Kolbe, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, and all the other holy women and men who have gone before us to do the right thing, the heroic thing, in the face of suffering and adversity.

This is the kind of freedom that can transform the world. And it should animate all of our talk about liberty - religious or otherwise.

I say this for two reasons. Here's the first reason. Real freedom isn't something Caesar can give or take away. He can interfere with it; but when he does, he steals from his own legitimacy.

Here's the second reason. The purpose of religious liberty is to create the context for true freedom. Religious liberty is a foundational right. It's necessary for a good society. But it can never be sufficient for human happiness. It's not an end in itself. In the end, we defend religious liberty in order to live the deeper freedom that is discipleship in Jesus Christ. What good is religious freedom, consecrated in the law, if we don't then use that freedom to seek God with our whole mind and soul and strength?

Today, July 4, we celebrate the birth of a novus ordo seclorum - a "new order of the ages," the American Era. God has blessed our nation with resources, power, beauty and the rule of law. We have so much to be grateful for. But these are gifts. They can be misused. They can be lost. In coming years, we'll face more and more serious challenges to religious liberty in our country. This is why the Fortnight for Freedom has been so very important.

And yet, the political and legal effort to defend religious liberty - as vital as it is - belongs to a much greater struggle to master and convert our own hearts, and to live for God completely, without alibis or self-delusion. The only question that finally matters is this one: Will we live wholeheartedly for Jesus Christ? If so, then we can be a source of freedom for the world. If not, nothing else will do.

God's words in today's first reading are a caution we ignore at our own expense. "Son of man," God says to Ezekiel and to all of us, "I have appointed you as a sentinel. If I say to the wicked, 'you will surely die' - and you do not warn them or speak out to dissuade them . . . I will hold you responsible for their blood."

Here's what that means for each of us: We live in a time that calls for sentinels and public witness. Every Christian in every era faces the same task. But you and I are responsible for this moment. Today. Now. We need to "speak out," not only for religious liberty and the ideals of the nation we love, but for the sacredness of life and the dignity of the human person - in other words, for the truth of what it means to be made in the image and likeness of God.

We need to be witnesses of that truth not only in word, but also in deed. In the end, we're missionaries of Jesus Christ, or we're nothing at all. And we can't share with others what we don't live faithfully and joyfully ourselves.

When we leave this Mass today, we need to render unto Caesar those things that bear his image. But we need to render ourselves unto God -- generously, zealously, holding nothing back. To the extent we let God transform us into his own image, we will - by the example of our lives - fulfill our duty as citizens of the United States, but much more importantly, as disciples of Jesus Christ.

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Editor's Note: For more information about the Fortnight for Freedom in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia please visit http://archphila.org/HHS/hhs.htm. For further information about the Fortnight for Freedom nationally please visit www.Fortnight4Freedom.org.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Announces Additional Resolutions Of Cases Of Priests On Administrative Leave Archbishop Chaput Makes Final Decisions In Six More Cases Of Priests Placed On Administrative Leave Following The February 2011 Grand Jury Report

July 6, 2012

THE ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA ANNOUNCES
ADDITIONAL RESOLUTIONS OF CASES OF
PRIESTS ON ADMINISTRATIVE LEAVE

Archbishop Chaput makes final decisions in six more cases of priests placed on administrative leave following the February 2011 Grand Jury Report


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced today that Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., has made final decisions in six additional cases of the priests who were placed on administrative leave following the February 2011 Grand Jury Report. Through a rigorous investigative process involving over 20 experts in child abuse four of the priests have been found suitable for ministry and two have been found not suitable for ministry.

In the cases of those found unsuitable for ministry none were due to a substantiated allegation of sexual abuse of a minor and five were due to a substantiated violation of the Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries. The priests found unsuitable for ministry will have no public ministry in the Archdiocese. They do have the right to appeal the decision to the Holy See. For those found to have a substantiated allegation of sexual abuse of a minor, if they do not appeal, or if their appeal is unsuccessful, they could be laicized (removed from the clerical state) or live a life of prayer and penance.

Archbishop Chaput said, "In making these decisions I relied on the counsel of numerous experts in two separate bodies-the Multi-Disciplinary Team and the Archdiocesan Review Board. They come from various professional disciplines and have dedicated their lives to child protection, to the investigation of sexual offenders and to support for victims of sexual violence. I'm grateful for their tireless efforts. The experience of these doctors, police officers, former prosecutors, victims' advocates and others in dealing with the broad societal problem of sexual abuse was crucial to our work."

Prior to conducting an investigation, each case was submitted to the appropriate local district attorney's office. After receiving clearance, that investigation was conducted by the Multi-Disciplinary Team (MDT) led by veteran child abuse prosecutor Gina Maisto Smith. The results of the investigations were provided to the Archdiocesan Review Board (ARB), which provided a recommendation to the Archbishop, who made the final decision.

To date, the multidisciplinary team has located, gathered and reviewed more than 400,000 pages of relevant documents, identified, located and interviewed 227 witnesses, across the United States and in several foreign countries, and conducted countless site visits to parishes and schools where incidents were alleged to have occurred. Many cases involved a search for additional evidence including yearbooks, parish records, photographs and public documents. Some cases dated as far back in time as 40 years, which posed significant investigative challenges.

At a news conference on May 4, 2012, Archbishop Chaput announced initial resolutions in eight of the cases of priests placed on administrative leave following the February 2011 Grand Jury Report. At that time, three priests were found suitable for ministry and five priests were found unsuitable for ministry. In one additional case, the priest on administrative leave died before a full investigation could be conducted. Therefore, it was not possible to reach a conclusion. All of those cases followed the same process of clearance by the district attorney, investigation by the MDT, review by the ARB and a final decision by the Archbishop. More information regarding that announcement, including video of the Archbishop's remarks from the news conference, is available at www.archphila.org.

With the decisions announced today, the Archdiocese will continue the initiative entitled Honesty, Healing and Hope in Christ: Confronting Sexual Violence in Our Archdiocese, which was introduced in May 2012. This program takes place at the parish level and consists of four phases over six months. Its purpose is to address the wide variety of reactions, thoughts and feelings experienced at the time of the announcements and in the days and weeks moving forward. It identifies three primary stakeholders: the victims of the allegation or violation of The Standards of Ministerial Behaviors and Boundaries, the parishioners, who include school and Parish Religious Education Program (PREP) families, and the priests on administrative leave. Through the implementation of this initiative, the Archdiocese continues a journey of honesty, healing and hope toward the restoration of trust.

Not all of the remaining administrative leave cases are being announced today for a variety of reasons. The Archdiocese referred all of its cases to the local district attorney. A handful of cases have not yet been cleared by law enforcement so the internal Archdiocesan investigation led by the Multi-Disciplinary Team (MDT) has not begun. A few cases were just recently released by law enforcement and are currently under investigation by the MDT. In other cases, the Archdiocese has received clearance, the internal investigation is complete, and the matter is awaiting examination by the Archdiocesan Review Board or a final decision by Archbishop Chaput.

Due to the ongoing process there is no indication as to when the resolutions of the remaining cases will be made, however the Archdiocese hopes to announce them as soon as possible.

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Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

La Arquidiócesis De Filadelfia Anuncia Resoluciones Adicionales De Casos De Sacerdotes En Ausencia Administrativa

July 6, 2012

LA ARQUIDIÓCESIS DE FILADELFIA ANUNCIA RESOLUCIONES ADICIONALES DE CASOS DE SACERDOTES EN AUSENCIA ADMINISTRATIVA


Arzobispo Chaput hace decisiones finales en seis casos de sacerdotes colocados en ausencia administrativa después del Informe del Gran Jurado de febrero del 2011


La Arquidiócesis de Filadelfia anunció hoy que el arzobispo Charles J. Chaput, OFM Cap., ha tomado decisiones finales en seis casos adicionales de los sacerdotes que fueron puestos en ausencia administrativa después del Informe del Gran Jurado de febrero del 2011. A través de un riguroso proceso de investigación en el que participaron más de 20 expertos en abuso infantil cuatro de los sacerdotes han sido encontrados aptos para el Ministerio y dos han sido encontrados no aptos para el Ministerio.

En los casos de aquellos encontrados no aptos para el Ministerio ninguno fue debido a una denuncia justificada de abuso sexual de un menor y dos fueron debido a una violación justificada de los Estándares de comportamiento ministerial y sus límites (Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries). Los sacerdotes encontrados no aptos para el Ministerio no tendrán ningún ministerio público en la Arquidiócesis. Ellos tienen derecho a apelar la decisión a la Santa Sede. Para aquellos que tienen una denuncia justificada de abuso sexual de un menor, si ellos no apelan, o si su apelación no es exitosa, podrían ser secularizados (eliminado del estado clerical) o vivir una vida de oración y penitencia (life of prayer and penance).

Arzobispo Chaput dijo: "Al tomar estas decisiones me basé en el consejo de numerosos expertos en dos cuerpos separados -el Multi-Disciplinary Team (Equipo Multidisciplinario) y el Archdiocesan Review Board (Junta de Revisión Arquidiocesana). Vienen de diferentes disciplinas profesionales y han dedicado sus vidas a la protección de los niños, la investigación de los delincuentes sexuales y el apoyo a las víctimas de violencia sexual. Estoy agradecido por sus incansables esfuerzos. La experiencia de estos médicos, policías, ex fiscales, defensores de víctimas y otras personas de hacer frente al amplio problema social de abuso sexual fue crucial para nuestro trabajo."

Antes de realizar una investigación, cada caso fue sometido a la fiscalía local apropiada. Después de recibir la autorización, la investigación se llevó a cabo por el Equipo Multidisciplinario (MDT por sus siglas en inglés), dirigido por la veterana fiscal de abuso infantil, Gina Maisto Smith. Los resultados de las investigaciones fueron proporcionados a la Junta de Revisión de la Arquidiócesis (ARB por sus siglas en inglés), que proporcionó una recomendación al arzobispo, quien tomó la decisión final.

Hasta la fecha, el equipo multidisciplinario ha localizado, reunido y revisado más de 400.000 páginas de documentos relevantes; identificado, localizado y entrevistado a 227 testigos, a través de Estados Unidos y en varios países extranjeros; y realizado innumerables visitas a las parroquias y escuelas, donde los incidentes presuntamente han ocurrido. Muchos de los casos implicaron una búsqueda de evidencia adicional, incluyendo los anuarios, los registros parroquiales, fotografías y documentos públicos. La fecha en algunos casos data de 40 años atrás, lo que plantea importantes retos de investigación

En una conferencia de prensa el 04 de mayo del 2012, el arzobispo Chaput anunció resoluciones iniciales en ocho de los casos de sacerdotes en ausencia administrativa después del Informe del Gran Jurado de febrero del 2011. En ese momento, tres sacerdotes fueron encontrados aptos para el Ministerio y cinco sacerdotes resultaron no aptos para el Ministerio. En un caso adicional, el sacerdote en ausencia administrativa falleció antes de que pudiera llevarse a cabo una investigación completa. Por lo tanto, no fue posible llegar a una conclusión. Todos esos casos siguen el mismo proceso de aprobación por el fiscal de distrito, la investigación por el MDT, revisión por la ARB y una decisión final por el arzobispo. Más información acerca de ese anuncio, incluyendo video de observaciones del arzobispo desde la conferencia de prensa, está disponible en www.archphila.org.

Con las decisiones que se han anunciado hoy, la Arquidiócesis continuará la iniciativa titulada Honesty, Healing and Hope in Christ: Confronting Sexual Violence in Our Archdiocese, (Honestidad, sanación y esperanza en Cristo: frente a la violencia sexual en nuestra Arquidiócesis), que fue presentada en mayo del 2012. Este programa se lleva a cabo en las parroquias y consta de cuatro fases a lo largo de seis meses. Su propósito es abordar la amplia variedad de reacciones, pensamientos y sentimientos experimentados en el momento de los anuncios y en los días y semanas que siguen. Se identifican tres partes interesadas: las víctimas de la denuncia o de la violación de The Standards of Ministerial Behaviors and Boundaries, los feligreses, que incluyen la escuela y las familias del Programa de Educación Religiosa Parroquial (PREP por sus siglas en inglés) y los sacerdotes en ausencia administrativa. A través de la implementación de esta iniciativa, la Arquidiócesis sigue un camino de honestidad, curación y esperanza hacia el restablecimiento de la confianza.

No todos los casos restantes de ausencia administrativa se están anunciando hoy por una variedad de razones. La Arquidiócesis refirió todos sus casos a la fiscalía local. Un puñado de casos no ha sido aún liberado por las autoridades de la ley por lo que no ha comenzado la investigación interna arquidiocesana liderada por el Equipo Multidisciplinario (MDT). Algunos casos fueron recientemente liberados por las autoridades de la ley y están actualmente bajo investigación por el Equipo Multidisciplinario. En otros casos, la Arquidiócesis ha recibido la autorización, la investigación interna es completa y el asunto está pendiente de examen por la Junta de Revisión Arquidiocesana o una decisión final por el arzobispo Chaput.

Debido al proceso en curso no hay ninguna indicación de cuándo las resoluciones de los casos restantes se harán, sin embargo, la Arquidiócesis espera darlos a conocer tan pronto como sea posible.

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Nota del editor: Para información adicional por favor visite
http://archphila.org/HHHIC/hhhic.htm.


Contact
Kenneth Gavin
Director asociado de Comunicaciones
215-587-3747

Update Regarding Reverend Geraldo J. Piñero

July 15, 2012

UPDATE REGARDING
REVEREND GERALDO J. PIÑERO


Reverend Geraldo Piñero has been found unsuitable for ministry by Archbishop Charles J. Chaput after a substantiated violation of The Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries.

Father Piñero had stepped down as pastor of Incarnation of Our Lord Parish in the Olney section of Philadelphia in November 2010 when federal authorities executed a search warrant at the parish rectory. His ministry has been restricted since that time and he has not been permitted to exercise his public ministry, wear clerical garb or present himself publicly as a priest.

An announcement was made at Incarnation of Our Lord Parish when Fr. Piñero stepped down and was placed on leave in November 2010. An update was provided at the parish this weekend. Counselors were present.

On May 4th and July 6th, Archbishop Chaput announced a total of 14 resolutions to the 26 cases of priests on administrative leave as a result of the February 2011 Grand Jury report. The announcement regarding Father Piñero is not connected to those cases.

Father Piñero is 47 years old. He was ordained in 1991. He served at the following parishes and schools: Incarnation of Our Lord, Philadelphia (1991-1997); Personal Leave (1997-2000) with residence at Saint Bridget, Philadelphia (1997-1999), Saint Charles Borromeo, Philadelphia (1999), and at a private residence (1999-2000). He also served at Saint Joseph, Aston (2000-2003) and Incarnation of Our Lord, Philadelphia (2003-2011).

If you would like to report a violation of The Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries, contact the Archdiocesan Office for Investigations at 1-800-932-0313.

If you would like to report an allegation of sexual abuse, contact your local law enforcement agency and/or the Office for Investigations at 1-800-932-0313.

We recognize that this public notice may be painful to victims of sexual violence. If you need support or assistance, victim services are available to you through the Victim Assistance Office of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia at 1-888-800-8780 or philavac@adphila.org.

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Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Statement Of Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.f.m. Cap. Funeral Of Highway Patrol Officer Brian Lorenzo

July 12, 2012

STATEMENT OF ARCHBISHOP CHARLES J. CHAPUT, O.F.M. CAP.
FUNERAL OF HIGHWAY PATROL OFFICER BRIAN LORENZO


"I'm not able to be present today for the funeral of Highway Patrol Officer Brian Lorenzo, but I offer my heartfelt and prayerful condolences to his wife and children along with all those who mourn his loss. Today, those whose lives were touched by Officer Lorenzo will struggle with grief at his death and anger at the circumstances.

Tragedies such as this can be a severe test of faith, but hope is present in Jesus Christ, whose Resurrection promises eternal triumph over sin and death. As we ask God to pour his bountiful mercy on the soul of Officer Lorenzo we also pray for all of the brave men and women who wake up each day ready to give their lives for the peace and protection of our city.

May Almighty God grant eternal life to Officer Lorenzo and the Lord give every strength, grace and blessing to his family."

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Contact
Kenneth Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Former Lacrosse Coach Charged

July 17, 2012

FORMER LACROSSE COACH CHARGED


Mr. Timothy Udinski, a former boys' lacrosse coach from Lansdale Catholic High School for the 2010-2011 season, was arrested today in Montgomery County. He has been charged with harassment and stalking by the Montgomery County District Attorney's Office for allegedly sending false claims of sexual abuse in anonymous emails to the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

Lansdale Catholic High School and the Archdiocese of Philadelphia take all allegations of abuse seriously. Each of these allegations, as is our practice, was immediately reported to law enforcement. Lansdale Catholic High School President Jim Casey expressed the school's gratitude to the Montgomery County District Attorney's Office. "We want to thank District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman and the detectives who spent countless hours working on these cases," said Casey. "We are grateful for their diligence and concern for our students."

If anyone has any information regarding this matter, please contact the Montgomery County District Attorney's Office at 610-278-3090.


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Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Philadelphia Parishioners Head To National Black Catholic Congress Over 120 Local Participants Are Expected

July 17, 2012

PHILADELPHIA PARISHIONERS HEAD TO
NATIONAL BLACK CATHOLIC CONGRESS

Over 120 local participants are expected


This year marks the 25th anniversary that the Black Catholic community has gathered at the National Black Catholic Congress to celebrate their heritage and faith. Black Catholics throughout the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will depart this week to the National Black Catholic Congress, in Indianapolis, Indiana. A bus will leave from Holy Redeemer Church in Chinatown:

Wednesday, July 18, 2012
8:00 a.m.
Holy Redeemer Church
915 Vine Street
Philadelphia, PA 19107


The theme of this year's Congress is: Faith Engaged: Empower. Equip. Evangelize.

The Philadelphia group will join with over 3,200 other Catholics from across the United States to pray, listen, and learn about how to build and strengthen the Black Catholic community in their diocese.


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Editor's Note: For more information on the National Black Catholic Congress visit http://www.nbccongress.org/


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Office Of Catholic Education Announces New Superintendents

July 19, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA
OFFICE OF CATHOLIC EDUCATION
ANNOUNCES NEW SUPERINTENDENTS


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia Office of Catholic Education announces Dr. Carol A. Cary as the new Superintendent of Secondary Schools and Ms. Jacqueline P. Coccia as the new Superintendent of Elementary Schools effective July 19, 2012. Dr. Cary and Ms. Coccia were chosen to lead the Archdiocese's 17 high schools and 123 elementary schools respectively through an exhaustive search process that included consultation from Dr. John DeFlaminis, Executive Director of the Penn Center for Educational Leadership, and Mr. Edward Hanway, Chairman of the Faith in the Future Foundation.

Dr. Cary, 57, brings more than 20 years of experience to her new role as Superintendent of Secondary Schools, in which she will oversee the education of over 16,000 students enrolled in Archdiocesan high schools. In addition to an extensive background in education, Dr. Cary has experience running a successful million dollar retail business. Prior to being named Superintendent of Secondary Schools, Dr. Cary was the Director of Secondary Curriculum, Instruction and Professional Development for almost five years in the Office of Catholic Education (OCE), where she was responsible for supervising the academic administrators and the curriculum committee members; identifying and implementing strategic initiatives resulting in student achievement gains, increased professional development and student-centered approaches to learning. Before joining OCE, Dr. Cary began her educational administration career in the Archdiocese in 2002 as Principal of Saint Anastasia Parish School in Newtown Square, Delaware County, where the school was named a National Blue Ribbon School of Excellence. Dr. Cary holds a Pennsylvania Superintendent Certificate as well as a Doctoral Degree in Educational Administration.

Ms. Coccia, 47, enters her new role within the Office of Catholic Education with more than 13 years of experience in the Catholic education. She began her career at Holy Trinity Catholic School in Bridgeport, Montgomery County in 1999 and later went on to be Principal there as well as at Saint Denis Parish School in Havertown, Delaware County, before joining OCE administration as Director of Elementary Education where she has been the last two years. Ms. Coccia's responsibilities included coordinating strategic planning efforts for OCE and the Office of Catechetical Formation, assisting elementary school principals in the implementation of the Common Core State Standards, providing support to pastors, principals, teachers and parish and regional elementary schools and mentoring first-and second-year principals. Ms. Coccia holds a Pennsylvania certification in K-12 Administration, Elementary Education and Early Childhood Education as well as a Master of Arts Degree in Educational Leadership and Administration.

"The Archdiocese of Philadelphia undertook an extensive, national search and looked to outside counsel to ensure that we selected candidates that best exemplify the skill-set needed to lead the students of the Archdiocese in the 21st century," said Bishop Michael Fitzgerald, who oversees Catholic Education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. "Dr. Cary and Ms. Coccia have demonstrated their commitment to instructional innovation, academic excellence and Catholic values that are central to our schools, and the strongest possible future for Catholic education."

For more information about the schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia please visit www.catholicschools-phl.org/

Editor's Note: For photos of Dr. Cary and Ms. Coccia please email communof@adphila.org.


Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Statement From The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia After Sentencing Of Monsignor William Lynn

July 24, 2012

STATEMENT FROM THE ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA
AFTER SENTENCING OF MONSIGNOR WILLIAM LYNN


From the challenges the Church has faced both nationally and locally over the past decade, we understand the full gravity of sexual abuse. This year and even this week, Pennsylvania has been the epicenter of this issue, and we know there is legitimate anger in the broad community toward any incident or enabling of sexual abuse. The trial of the past several months has been especially difficult for victims, and we profoundly regret their pain.

The public humiliation of the Church has emphasized the vital lesson that we must be constantly vigilant in our charge to protect the children in our parishes and schools. Since the events some ten years ago that were at the center of this trial, the Archdiocese has changed. We have taken dramatic steps to ensure that all young people in our care are safe, and these efforts will continue even more forcefully now and in the years ahead.

We remain committed to protecting children and caring for victims. Fair-minded people will question the severity of the heavy, three to six year sentence imposed on Msgr. Lynn today. We hope that when this punishment is objectively reviewed, it will be adjusted.

We pray for Msgr. Lynn and his family at this difficult time.

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Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Keynote Address At The Napa Institute Conference: Building A Culture Of Religious Freedom

July 27, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S KEYNOTE ADDRESS
AT THE NAPA INSTITUTE CONFERENCE:
BUILDING A CULTURE OF RELIGIOUS FREEDOM


A friend of mine, a political scientist, recently posed two very good questions. They go right to the heart of our discussion today. He wondered, first, if the religious freedom debate had "crossed a Rubicon" in our country's political life. And second, he asked if Catholic bishops now found themselves opposed -- in a new and fundamental way -- to the spirit of American society.

I'll deal with his first question in a moment. I'll come back to his second question at the end of my remarks. But we should probably begin our time together today by recalling that even at the height of anti-Catholic bigotry, Catholics have always served our country with distinction. More than 80 Catholic chaplains died in World War II, Korea and Vietnam. All four chaplains who won the Medal of Honor in those wars were Catholic priests.

Time and again, Catholics have proven their love of our nation with their talent, hard work and blood. So if the bishops of the United States ever find themselves opposed, in a fundamental way, to the spirit of our country, the fault won't lie with our bishops. It will lie with political and cultural leaders who turned our country into something it was never meant it to be.

So having said that, let's turn to my friend's first question.

The Rubicon is a river in northern Italy. It's small and forgettable except for one thing. During the Roman Republic, it marked a border. To the south lay Italy, ruled directly by the Roman Senate. To the north lay Gaul, ruled by a governor. Under Roman law, no general could enter Italy with an army. Doing so carried the death penalty. In 49 B.C., when Julius Caesar crossed the Rubicon with his 13th Legion and marched on Rome, he triggered a civil war and changed the course of history. Ever since then, "crossing the Rubicon" has meant passing a point of no return.

Caesar's march on Rome is a very long way from our nation's current disputes over religious liberty. But "crossing the Rubicon" is still a useful image. My friend's point is this: Have we, in fact, crossed a border in our country's history - the line between a religion-friendly past, and an emerging America much less welcoming to Christian faith and witness?

Let me describe the nation we were, and the nation we're becoming. Then you can judge for yourselves.

People often argue about whether America's Founders were mainly Christian, mainly Deist, or both of the above. It's a reasonable debate. It won't end anytime soon. But no one can reasonably dispute that the Founders' moral framework was overwhelmingly shaped by Christian faith. And that makes sense because America was largely built by Christians. The world of the American Founders was heavily Christian, and they saw the value of publicly engaged religious faith because they experienced its influence themselves. They created a nation designed in advance to depend on the moral convictions of religious believers, and to welcome their active role in public life.

The Founders also knew that religion is not just a matter of private conviction. It can't be reduced to personal prayer or Sunday worship. It has social implications. The Founders welcomed those implications. Christian faith demands preaching, teaching, public witness and service to others - by each of us alone, and by acting in cooperation with fellow believers. As a result, religious freedom is never just freedom from repression but also - and more importantly -- freedom for active discipleship. It includes the right of religious believers, leaders and communities to engage society and to work actively in the public square. For the first 160 years of the republic, cooperation between government and religious entities was the norm in addressing America's social problems. And that brings us to our country's current situation.

Americans have always been a religious people. They still are. Roughly 80 percent of Americans call themselves Christians. Millions of Americans take their faith seriously. Millions act on it accordingly. Religious practice remains high. That's the good news. But there's also bad news. In our courts, in our lawmaking, in our popular entertainment and even in the way many of us live our daily lives, America is steadily growing more secular. Mainline Churches are losing ground. Many of our young people spurn Christianity. Many of our young adults lack any coherent moral formation. Even many Christians who do practice their religion follow a kindi of easy, self-designed gospel that led author Ross Douthat to call us a "nation of heretics." i Taken together, these facts suggest an American future very different from anything in our nation's past.

There's more. Contempt for religious faith has been growing in America's leadership classes for many decades, as scholars like Christian Smith and Christopher Lasch have shown.ii But in recent years, government pressure on religious entities has become a pattern, and it goes well beyond the current administration's HHS mandate. It involves interfering with the conscience rights of medical providers, private employers and individual citizens. And it includes attacks on the policies, hiring practices and tax statuses of religious charities, hospitals and other ministries. These attacks are real. They're happening now. And they'll get worse as America's religious character weakens.

This trend is more than sad. It's dangerous. Our political system presumes a civil society that pre-exists and stands outside the full control of the state. In the American model, the state is meant to be modest in scope and constrained by checks and balances. Mediating institutions like the family, churches and fraternal organizations feed the life of the civic community. They stand between the individual and the state. And when they decline, the state fills the vacuum they leave. Protecting these mediating institutions is therefore vital to our political freedom. The state rarely fears individuals, because alone, individuals have little power. They can be isolated or ignored. But organized communities are a different matter. They can resist. And they can't be ignored.

This is why, for example, if you want to rewrite the American story into a different kind of social experiment, the Catholic Church is such an annoying problem. She's a very big community. She has strong beliefs. And she has an authority structure that's very hard to break - the kind that seems to survive every prejudice and persecution, and even the worst sins of her own leaders. Critics of the Church have attacked America's bishops so bitterly, for so long, over so many different issues - including the abuse scandal, but by no means limited to it -- for very practical reasons. If a wedge can be driven between the pastors of the Church and her people; then a strong Catholic witness on controversial issues breaks down into much weaker groups of discordant voices.

The theme of our time together today is "building a culture of religious freedom." How do we do that?

We can start by changing the way we habitually think. Democracy is not an end in itself. Majority opinion does not determine what is good and true. Like every other form of social organization and power, democracy can become a form of repression and idolatry. The problems we now face in our country didn't happen overnight. They've been growing for decades, and they have moral roots. America's bishops named the exile of God from public consciousness as "the root of the world's travail today" nearly 65 years ago. And they accurately predicted the effects of a life without God on the individual, the family, education, economic activity and the international community.iii Obviously, too few people listened.

We also need to change the way we act. We need to understand that we can't quick-fix our way out of problems we behaved ourselves into. Catholics have done very well in the United States. As I said earlier, most of us have a deep love for our country, its freedoms and its best ideals. But this is not our final home. There is no automatic harmony between Christian faith and American democracy. The eagerness of Catholics to push their way into our country's mainstream over the past half century, to climb the ladder of social and economic success, has done very little to Christianize American culture. But it's done a great deal to weaken the power of our Catholic witness.

In the words of scholar Robert Kraynak, democracy - for all of its strengths -- also "has within it the potential for its own kind of 'social tyranny'." The reason is simple. Democracy advances "the forces of mass culture which lower the tone of society . . . by lowering the aims of life from classical beauty, heroic virtues and otherworldly transcendence to the pursuits of work, material consumption and entertainment." This inevitably tends to "[reduce] human life to a one-dimensional materialism and [an] animal existence that undermines human dignity and eventually leads to the 'abolition of man'." iv

To put it another way: The right to pursue happiness does not include a right to excuse or ignore evil in ourselves or anyone else. When we divorce our politics from a grounding in virtue and truth, we transform our country from a living moral organism into a kind of golem of legal machinery without a soul.

This is why working for good laws is so important. This is why getting involved politically is so urgent. This is why every one of our votes matters. We need to elect the best public leaders, who then create the best policies and appoint the best judges. This has a huge impact on the kind of nation we become. Democracies depend for their survival on people of conviction fighting for what they believe in the public square -- legally and peacefully, but zealously and without apologies. That includes you and me.

Critics often accuse faithful Christians of pursuing a "culture war" on issues like abortion, sexuality, marriage and the family, and religious liberty. And in a sense, they're right. We are fighting for what we believe. But of course, so are advocates on the other side of all these issues - and neither they nor we should feel uneasy about it. Democracy thrives on the struggle of competing ideas. We steal from ourselves and from everyone else if we try to avoid that struggle. In fact, two of the worst qualities in any human being are cowardice and acedia - and by acedia I mean the kind of moral sloth that masquerades as "tolerance" and leaves a human soul so empty of courage and character that even the devil Screwtape would spit it out.v

In real life, democracy is built on two practical pillars: cooperation and conflict. It requires both. Cooperation, because people have a natural hunger for solidarity that makes all community possible. And conflict, because people have competing visions of what is right and true. The more deeply they hold their convictions, the more naturally people seek to have those convictions shape society.

What that means for Catholics is this: We have a duty to treat all persons with charity and justice. We have a duty to seek common ground where possible. But that's never an excuse for compromising with grave evil. It's never an excuse for being naive. And it's never an excuse for standing idly by while our liberty to preach and serve God in the public square is whittled away. We need to work vigorously in law and politics to form our culture in a Christian understanding of human dignity and the purpose of human freedom. Otherwise, we should stop trying to fool ourselves that we really believe what we claim to believe.

There's more. To work as it was intended, America needs a special kind of citizenry; a mature, well-informed electorate of persons able to reason clearly and rule themselves prudently. If that's true - and it is - then the greatest danger to American liberty in our day is not religious extremism. It's something very different. It's a culture of narcissism that cocoons us in dumbed down, bigoted news, vulgarity, distraction and noise, while methodically excluding God from the human imagination. Kierkegaard once wrote that "the introspection of silence is the condition of all educated intercourse," and that "talkativeness is afraid of the silence which reveals its emptiness." vi Silence feeds the soul. Silence invites God to speak. And silence is exactly what American culture no longer allows. Securing the place of religious freedom in our society is therefore not just a matter of law and politics, but of prayer, interior renewal - and also education.

What I mean is this. We need to re-examine the spirit that has ruled the Catholic approach to American life for the past 60 years. In forming our priests, deacons, teachers and catechists -- and especially the young people in our schools and religious education programs -- we need to be much more penetrating and critical in our attitudes toward the culture around us. We need to recover our distinctive Catholic identity and history. Then we need to act on them. America is becoming a very different country, and as Ross Douthat argues so well in his excellent book Bad Religion, a renewed American Christianity needs to be ecumenical, but also confessional. Why? Because "In an age of institutional weakness and doctrinal drift, American Christianity has much more to gain from a robust Catholicism and a robust Calvinism, than it does from even the most fruitful Catholic-Calvinist theological dialogue."vii

America is now mission territory. Our own failures helped to make it that way. We need to admit that. Then we need to re-engage the work of discipleship to change it.

I want to close by returning to the second of my friend's two questions. He asked if our nation's Catholic bishops now find themselves opposed -- in a new and fundamental way -- to the nature of American society. I can speak only for myself. But I suspect that for many of my brother American bishops, the answer to that question is a mix of both no and yes.

The answer is "no" in the sense that the Catholic Church has always thrived in the United States, even in the face of violent bigotry. Catholics love and thank God for this country. They revere the American legacy of democracy, law and ordered liberty. As the bishops wrote in 1940 on the eve of World War II, "[we] renew [our] most sacred and sincere loyalty to our government and to the basic ideals of the American Republic . . . [and we] are again resolved to give [ourselves] unstintingly to its defense and its lasting endurance and welfare." viii Hundreds of thousands of American Catholics did exactly that on the battlefields of Europe and the South Pacific.

But the answer is "yes" in the sense that the America of Catholic memory is not the America of the present moment or the emerging future. Sooner or later, a nation based on a degraded notion of liberty, on license rather than real freedom - in other words, a nation of abortion, disordered sexuality, consumer greed, and indifference to immigrants and the poor - will not be worthy of its founding ideals. And on that day, it will have no claim on virtuous hearts.

In many ways I believe my own generation, the boomer generation, has been one of the most problematic in our nation's history because of our spirit of entitlement and moral superiority; our appetite for material comfort unmoored from humility; our refusal to acknowledge personal sin and accept our obligations to the past.

But we can change that. Nothing about life is predetermined except the victory of Jesus Christ. We create the future. We do it not just by our actions, but by what we really believe -- because what we believe shapes the kind of people we are. In a way, "growing a culture of religious freedom" is the better title for this talk. A culture is more than what we make or do or build. A culture grows organically out of the spirit of a people - how we live, what we cherish, what we're willing to die for.

If we want a culture of religious freedom, we need to begin it here, today, now. We live it by giving ourselves wholeheartedly to God and the Gospel of Jesus Christ -- by loving God with passion and joy, confidence and courage; and by holding nothing back. God will take care of the rest. Scripture says, "Unless the Lord builds the house, those who build it labor in vain" (Ps 127:1). In the end, God is the builder. We're the living stones. The firmer our faith, the deeper our love, the purer our zeal for God's will - then the stronger the house of freedom will be that rises in our own lives, and in the life of our nation.

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i For patterns of religious belief in various age groups, see Barna Group and Pew Research Center data. For the state of moral formation among young adults, see Christian Smith, editor, Lost in Transition: The Dark Side of Emerging Adulthood, Oxford University Press, New York, 2011. For an overview of American religious trends and their meaning, see Ross Douthat, Bad Religion: How We Became a Nation of Heretics, Free Press, New York, 2012
ii See Christopher Lasch, The Revolt of the Elites and the Betrayal of Democracy, W.W. Norton, New York, 1995; and Christian Smith, editor, The Secular Revolution: Power, Interests and Conflict in the Secularization of American Public Life, University of California Press, Los Angeles, 2003
iii "Secularism," a pastoral statement by the Administrative Board of the National Catholic Welfare Conference, on behalf of the bishops of the United States, November 14, 1947; as collected in Pastoral Letters of the American Hierarchy, 1792-1970, Hugh J. Nolan, editor, Our Sunday Visitor, Huntington, IN, 1971
iv Robert Kraynak, "Citizenship in Two Worlds: On the Tensions between Christian Faith and American Democracy," Josephinum Journal of Theology, Vol. 16, No. 2, 2009; see also a more extensive discussion of this theme in his book, Christian Faith and Modern Democracy: God and Politics in the Fallen World, University of Notre Dame Press, Notre Dame, IN, 2001
v C.S. Lewis, see his "Screwtape Proposes a Toast" in The Screwtape Letters, HarperCollins, New York, 2001
vi Soren Kierkegaard, The Present Age: On the Death of Rebellion, HarperPerennial, New York, 2010, p. 44-45
vii Douthat, Bad Religion, p. 286-287
viii "The American Republic," a statement by the bishops of the United States, November 13, 1940; as collected in Pastoral Letters of the American Hierarchy, 1792-1970


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Statement Regarding The Arrest Of Reverend Andrew D. Mccormick

July 27, 2012

STATEMENT REGARDING THE ARREST OF
REVEREND ANDREW D. MCCORMICK


Father Andrew McCormick was one of a number of priests placed on administrative leave by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia in March of 2011. That action was in response to concerns noted in the Grand Jury Report issued last February. The cases of those placed on leave at that time ranged from allegations of sexual abuse to boundary issues with minors. Since that time Father McCormick has not been permitted to exercise his public ministry, administer any of the Sacraments, or present himself publicly as a priest.

Last night he was arrested and charged with involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, statutory sexual assault, sexual assault, endangering the welfare of a child, corrupting the morals of a minor, indecent assault, and indecent exposure. We understand from law enforcement that they received an allegation in December of 2011 which led to this arrest. This is a new allegation to the Archdiocese.

Father McCormick is 56 years old. He was ordained in 1982. He has served at the following parishes in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia: Saint Adalbert Parish, Philadelphia (1982-1986); Saint John Cantius Parish, Philadelphia (1986-2000); Saint Bede the Venerable Parish, Holland (2000-2004); Sacred Heart Parish, Swedesburg (2004-2011).

If you have any information regarding this situation please contact the Philadelphia Police Department Special Victims Unit at 215-685-3251 or the Philadelphia District Attorney's Family Violence and Sexual Assault Unit at 215-686-8080.

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Editor's Note: For a copy of the press release regarding the 21 priests placed on administrative
leave on March 8, 2011 please visit http://archphila.org/press releases/pr001767.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Concelebrate Mass During Indian Catholic Heritage Day

August 3, 2012

Archbishop Chaput to Concelebrate Mass
During Indian Catholic Heritage Day


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., will concelebrate Mass with His Eminence Cardinal George Alencherry, Major Archbishop of Ernakulam-Angamali during Indian Catholic Heritage Day sponsored by the Indian American Catholic Association of Greater Philadelphia. Archbishops and Bishops from India will also be present.


Saturday, August 4, 2012
9:30 a.m. Procession
10:00 a.m. Mass
St. Thomas Syro-Malabar Catholic Church
608 Welsh Road, Philadelphia, PA 19115


Indian Catholic Heritage Day will begin with a colorful procession of men and women clad in traditional Indian garments, children carrying Indian lamps, accompanied by multi-colored umbrellas and a drum group. The procession will be followed by Mass. Traditional Indian dances and other variety entertainment programs will begin at 12:30 p.m.



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Editor's Note: For more information please contact Charly Chirayath at 267-994-6375.



Contact
Bonnie Olinger
Communications Assistant
215-587-3747

800th Anniversary Celebration Of The Founding Of The Poor Clare Sisters

August 8, 2012

800th Anniversary Celebration of
the Founding of the Poor Clare Sisters


Bishop Daniel E. Thomas, will be the main celebrant at a Mass marking the 800th anniversary of the founding of the Poor Clare Sisters. Father Mario Mastrangelo, O.F.M. Cap. will be the homilist.


Saturday, August 11, 2012
9:30 a.m. (Mass)
Monastery of Saint Clare
1319 Dogwood Street (for GPS purposes)
Langhorne, PA 19047 (Bucks County)



Saint Clare, was born in 1194. Her life was one of poverty, and service to her sisters and all who sought prayer and counsel. She was canonized a Saint in 1255, two years after her death.

The Poor Clares were founded in 1212. Each year, the sisters in Pennsylvania celebrate the feast of Saint Clare on August 11th. A Novena in their chapel begins on August 2nd. During this time, they entrust special intentions to Mary, Our Holy Mother. Petitions received are placed under the altar in the chapel. Saint Clare is especially honored during the Triduum which is held during the three days preceding her feast day.


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Contact
Bonnie Olinger
Communications Assistant
215-587-3747

Archdiocese of Philadelphia Provides Update Regarding Sale of Certain Real Estate Holdings

August 13, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA PROVIDES UPDATE
REGARDING SALE OF CERTAIN REAL ESTATE HOLDINGS


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announces today that it will sell select real estate holdings including the Villa Saint Joseph by the Sea property in Ventnor, New Jersey. It had been previously reported that the Archbishop's residence would be sold. The Archdiocese expects to sell that property in a private transaction.

Earlier this summer, the Archdiocese took significant steps to reduce its expected operating deficit for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2012. An operating deficit of at least $6 million is expected even before any extraordinary costs that may be incurred.

"To address the cash flow challenges caused by deficits, the Church is faced with hard decisions. It's similar to what families have to do when their expenses are greater than income," said Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. "We just can't afford to maintain and hold assets like Villa Saint Joseph by the Sea and my residence. Holding on to these properties at this time would be inconsistent with the mission of our Church."

Over the last several months, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and its Real Estate Committee has evaluated its real estate holdings, based on a variety of considerations. The Archdiocese, in consultation with the Real Estate Committee, will determine the method of sale for each of these properties on a case by case basis.

Villa Saint Joseph by the Sea (114 South Princeton Avenue; Ventnor, NJ 08046)
Constructed in 1905, this property has served as a summer vacation home for retired priests of the Archdiocese since 1963. Due to the unique characteristics of this beachfront property, it will be sold via auction by Max Spann Real Estate and Auction Company. Further details regarding the auction will be made available by the Max Spann firm on Tuesday, August 14th.

The Holy Family Center (227 North 18th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19103) and the Northern Portion of the Archdiocesan Pastoral Center Parking Lot (North 17th Street and Vine Street; Philadelphia, PA 19103)
The Holy Family Center is an approximately 20,000 square foot former convent located in the parking lot of the Archdiocesan Pastoral Center and serves as office space for various agencies of Catholic Social Services. The programs and employees will be relocated with no reduction in workforce. The building, along with the parking lot adjacent to it, encompasses the length of Vine Street from 17th Street to 18th Street. This property will be marketed by HFF, L.P.

The Mary Immaculate Center (300 Cherryville Road; Northampton, PA 18067)
The Mary Immaculate Center was originally built as a Seminary by the Congregation of Missions of Saint Vincent de Paul in 1939. From 1991 to 2005 it served as the location for the Spirituality Year Program for seminarians studying at Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary. When the Spirituality Year Program ended in 2005, the property served as a retreat center. The 452 acre property has been underutilized in recent years. This property is being marketed by Binswanger.

"The decision to sell these properties was not made lightly, but rather after prayer and careful consideration," said Archbishop Chaput. "Selling these assets will help us as we work to ensure the long-term financial stability and position the Archdiocese for future growth. It will also allow us to remain committed to the services and support we provide to the faithful as well as the broader community."

To the extent internal approvals are required, including approvals from Rome, they will be obtained prior to the closing of a sale on any property.

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Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Confirmation Schedule - Fall 2012 (as Of August 10, 2012 - Subject To Change)

October 1, 2012

CONFIRMATION SCHEDULE - FALL 2012
(as of October 1, 2012 - subject to change)


CELEBRANT: ARCHBISHOP CHARLES J. CHAPUT, O.F.M. Cap.

Tuesday, October 16, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Anslem, Philadelphia
Sunday, November 4, 2012, 12:00 Noon, Saint Ephrem, Bensalem
Monday, November 26, 2012, 6:00 p.m., Our Lady of Perpetual Help, Morton

CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND DANIEL E. THOMAS, Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia

Sunday, October 14, 2012, 12:00 Noon, Saint Philomena, Lansdowne
Saturday, November 3, 2012, 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m., Sacred Heart, Oxford
Sunday, November 4, 2012, 10:30 a.m., Holy Martyrs, Oreland
Tuesday, November 6, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Kevin, Springfield
Thursday, November 8, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Aloysius, Pottstown
Saturday, November 10, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Saint Madeline, Ridley Park
Thursday, November 29, 2012, 6:00 p.m., Holy Redeemer, Philadelphia
Thursday, December 6, 2012, 4:30 p.m., Saint John Bosco, Hatboro
Monday, December 10, 2012, 6:00 p.m., Immaculate Conception, Jenkintown

CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND TIMOTHY C. SENIOR, Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia

Sunday, October 14, 2012, 11:30 a.m., Saint Michael, Philadelphia
Thursday, November 8, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Dominic, Philadelphia
Saturday, November 10, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Saint Francis de Sales, Lenni
Saturday, November 17, 2012, 11:00 a.m., Our Lady of Grace, Penndel
Sunday, November 18, 2012, 3:00 p.m., Saint Vincent de Paul, Richboro
Sunday, November 25, 2012, 11:15 a.m., Saint Joan of Arc, Philadelphia at Mater Dolorosa Church
Saturday, December 1, 2012, 10:00 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., Our Lady of Calvary, Philadelphia
Tuesday, December 4, 2012, 5:00 p.m., Holy Innocents, Philadelphia
Thursday, December 6, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Immaculate Heart of Mary, Philadelphia
Sunday, December 9, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Saint Raymond of Penafort, Philadelphia
Thursday, December 13, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Assumption BVM, West Grove

CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND JOHN J. MCINTYRE, Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia

Saturday, October 13, 2012, 10:00 a.m. and 1:00 p.m., Saint Jude, Chalfont
Monday, October 22, 2012, 5:00 p.m., Nativity BVM, Our Lady Help of Christians and Saint Adalbert Parishes at Nativity B.V.M. Church, Philadelphia
Saturday, October 27, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Saint Dorothy, Drexel Hill
Sunday, October 28, 2012, 11:30 a.m., Our Lady of Peace, Milmont Park
Monday, November 5, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Notre Dame de Lourdes, Swarthmore
Saturday, November 10, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Sacred Heart, Royersford
Sunday, November 11, 2012, 9:00 a.m., Saint Barbara, Philadelphia

CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND MICHAEL J. FITZGERALD, Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia

Sunday, October 7, 2012, 10:30 a.m., Saint Augustine, Bridgeport
Saturday, October 13, 2012, 10:30 a.m., Annunciation BVM, Havertown
Sunday, October 14, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Saint Patrick, Philadelphia
Friday, October 19, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Corpus Christi, Lansdale (Upper Gwynedd)
Monday, October 22, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Mary of the Assumption, Phoenixville
Thursday, October 25, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Christ the King, Philadelphia
Friday, October 26, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Corpus Christi, Lansdale (Upper Gwynedd)
Sunday, October 28, 2012, 12:00 Noon, Saint Martha, Philadelphia
Tuesday, October 30, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Rose of Lima, Eddystone
Monday, December 10, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Martin of Tours, New Hope

CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND LOUIS A. DE SIMONE, Retired Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia

Saturday, October 20, 2012, 10:30 a.m., Saint Margaret, Narberth
Saturday, December 1, 2012, 11:00 a.m., Saint Denis, Havertown
Thursday, December 6, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Anthony of Padua, Ambler

CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND ROBERT P. MAGINNIS, Retired Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia

Monday, October 29, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint William, Philadelphia
Tuesday, November 6, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Bernard, Philadelphia
Thursday, November 8, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Queen of Peace, Ardlsey
Sunday, November 18, 2012, 11:00 a.m., Saint Bartholomew, Philadelphia
Tuesday, November 20, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Catherine of Siena, Horsham
Monday, November 26, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Vincent de Paul, Philadelphia
Saturday, December 1, 2012, 10:30 a.m., Our Lady of Charity, Brookhaven
Sunday, December 2, 2012, 11:00 a.m., Saint Thomas Aquinas, Croydon
Tuesday, December 4, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Margaret Mary Alacoque, Essington

CELEBRANT: MOST REVEREND JOSEPH F. MARTINO, Retired Bishop of Scranton

Saturday, October 20, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Saint Ann, Phoenixville
Tuesday, October 30, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Saint Rose of Lima, North Wales
Wednesday, November 7, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Holy Spirit, Philadelphia
Saturday, November 17, 2012, 10:30 a.m. & 1:30 p.m., Saint Anastasia, Newtown Square
Sunday, November 18, 2012, 3:00 p.m., Holy Trinity, Morrisville
Wednesday, November 28, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Our Lady of Fatima, Secane
Saturday, December 1, 2012, 10:00 a.m., Immaculate Conception, Marcus Hook
Sunday, December 2, 2012, 2:00 p.m., Saint Richard, Philadelphia
Wednesday, December 5, 2012, 4:00 p.m., Presentation B.V.M., Cheltenham

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Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia And The Faith In The Future Foundation Reach Historic Agreement To Create An Independently Managed Catholic School System

August 21, 2012

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia and the Faith in the Future Foundation Reach Historic Agreement to Create an Independently Managed Catholic School System


In reaching this first-of-its-kind agreement, The Faith in the Future Foundation will assume operational management and leadership of 17 Catholic secondary schools and four schools of special education from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia effective September 1, 2012.


(Philadelphia, August 21, 2012)- The Archdiocese of Philadelphia and the Faith and the Future Foundation, today announced that an agreement-in-principle has been reached to create an independently managed Catholic school system that would encompass the 17 high schools within the Archdiocese as well as its four schools of special education. The Foundation will assume strategic and operational management of these 21 Archdiocesan schools effective September 1, focusing upon major fundraising, enrollment management, marketing and cultivating best practices in leadership and education. Although this agreement specifically addresses the Archdiocesan high schools and the schools of special education, the Foundation, which will work in close partnership with the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, will also seek to provide support to the Archdiocesan grade schools and the newly formed Mission Schools.

A new executive management team is currently being created for the Faith in the Future Foundation. H. Edward Hanway, Chairman of the Faith in the Future Foundation and former Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of CIGNA Corporation, is serving as the Foundation's interim CEO. However, an extensive search is underway for a Foundation CEO. Mr. Hanway will remain as Foundation Chairman upon the appointment of the new CEO. Auxiliary Bishop Michael J. Fitzgerald, who oversees Catholic education for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, will serve on the Foundation's Board of Directors, whose inaugural appointments will be announced this fall.

"Today's agreement between the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and the Faith in the Future Foundation is unlike any agreement that a Diocese has achieved with its lay leadership," said Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. "The willingness of lay leaders with a love for Catholic education to step forward is encouraging. The commitment made by the Foundation-a commitment to professional excellence in management, guided by a strong and faithful Catholic identity-will serve our high schools and schools of special education well. We have seen the momentum that the Foundation has been able to generate, and we are confident that this agreement will lead to an even stronger school system for the children of the Philadelphia region."

The Office of Catholic Education (OCE), which is vital to the academic, co-curricular and extracurricular success of students within the secondary schools and schools of special education, will become a division of the Faith in the Future Foundation, reporting directly to the Foundation's CEO. The responsibilities of OCE remain focused upon curriculum and standards, academic and spiritual development of students, co-curricular and extra-curricular programming, and the professional development of teachers. The Presidents and Principals of the 17 Archdiocesan High Schools and four schools of special education will continue to report to OCE. All facilities will continue to be owned and operated by the Archdiocese.

"The independence of the Catholic secondary system, with the schools of special education, was critical to our ability to more fully address the fundraising and enrollment needs of our schools," said Mr. Hanway. "With capacity available to educate an additional 15,000 students, we fully intend to grow. This is a ground-breaking approach to educating our children and I am deeply pleased that Archbishop Chaput and Archdiocesan leadership were willing to make such a bold decision in reaching this agreement with the Foundation. I am confident that the Foundation can-and will-serve as a model for Catholic education across the nation as we infuse and employ an entrepreneurial approach to managing these 21 schools."

For more information about the Faith in the Future Foundation and its leadership of the 17 high schools and four schools of special education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, please visit www.FaithintheFuture.com. For additional information about Catholic education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, specifically a listing of all schools, please visit www.catholicschools-phl.org/.

The following schools will now be managed by the Faith in the Future Foundation:

High Schools:
- Archbishop John Carroll High School
- Archbishop Ryan High School
- Archbishop Wood High School
- Bishop McDevitt High School
- Bishop Shanahan High School
- Cardinal O'Hara High School
- Conwell-Egan Catholic High School
- Father Judge High School for Boys
- St. Hubert Catholic High School for Girls
- SS. John Neumann and Maria Goretti Catholic High School
- John W. Hallahan Catholic Girls' High School
- Lansdale Catholic High School
- Little Flower Catholic High School for Girls
- Monsignor Bonner and Archbishop Prendergast Catholic High School
- Pope John Paul II High School
- Roman Catholic High School for Boys
- West Philadelphia Catholic High School


Schools of Special Education:
- Archbishop Ryan School for the Deaf
- St. Katherine Day School
- St. Lucy School for Children with Visual Impairments
- Our Lady of Confidence Day School


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Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Cathedral Basilica Of Saints Peter And Paul 2012-2013 Concert Series Experience The Best In Sacred And Classical Music In A Cathedral Setting

August 22, 2012

CATHEDRAL BASILICA OF SAINTS PETER AND PAUL
2012-2013 CONCERT SERIES

Experience the best in Sacred and Classical Music in a Cathedral Setting


The second annual Cathedral Basilica Concert Series begins in September and will feature local and international groups in a seven concert series in the historic Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul, located at 18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway, Philadelphia, PA 19103. Tickets are now on sale and can be purchased by visiting cathedralphilaconcerts.org, and clicking the "Buy Tickets Here" link on the left side of the page.

Choral Arts Philadelphia

Saturday, September 29, 2012 at 8:00 p.m.
Sergei Rachmaninov's Vespers


Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia

Sunday, October 21, 2012 at 3:00 PM
Anton Bruckner's Mass in E minor
Robert Moran's Trinity Requiem and Angele Dei
with the Philadelphia Boys Choir and Philadelphia Chamber Orchestra


Tenebrae Choir of London
Friday, November 9, 2012 at 8:00 p.m.
Winner of the 2012 BBC Music Magazine's Choral Music Award


Vox Ama Deus
Friday, December 14, 2012 at 7:00 p.m.
George Fredric Handel's Messiah


Saint Thomas Choir of Men and Boys
Monday, March, 4, 2013 at 7:30 p.m.
This acclaimed choir from New York City will open its Spring 2013 Tour at
the Cathedral Basilica


The Philadelphia Singers
Friday, April 26, 2013 8:00 p.m. and Sunday, April 28, 2013 at 3:00 p.m.
Tchaikovsky's Liturgy of Saint John Chrysostom
and Alfred Schnittke's Choir Concerto


Archdiocesan Choir of Philadelphia
Sunday, June 9, 2013 3:00 at p.m.
Farewell Concert before Choral Pilgrimage to Italy


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Editor's Note: Artists and Dates subject to change. For more information please contact John Romeri, Director, Office for Liturgical Music, at (215) 587-3696 or email concerts@adphila.org.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Students Throughout The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Head Back To School For The 2012 - 2013 School Year

August 30, 2012

STUDENTS THROUGHOUT THE ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA
HEAD BACK TO SCHOOL FOR THE 2012 - 2013 SCHOOL YEAR


The 2012-2013 school year begins on Wednesday, September 5, 2012 for Archdiocesan students who attend its 123 elementary schools, 17 high schools and four schools of special education. This school year begins on the heels of several key announcements including an agreement being reached between the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and the Faith in the Future Foundation to have the Foundation assume strategic and operational management of 21 Archdiocesan schools, and the appointment of two new Superintendents.

Back-to-School Events Happening in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia

Wednesday, September 5, 2012: First Day of School at 8:00 a.m. - 8:30 a.m.
Archbishop Ryan School for the Deaf, 4251 "L" Street, Philadelphia, PA 19124
The 2012-2013 school year marks the 100th anniversary of Archbishop Ryan School for the Deaf. Ms. Jacqueline Coccia, Superintendent of Elementary Schools, and Mr. H. Edward Hanway, Chairman of the Faith in the Future Foundation, will greet students as they arrive for their first day of school.

Thursday, September 6, 2012 at 9:15 a.m.
Mater Dei Catholic School, 493 East Main Street, Lansdale, PA 19446-2898
Archbishop Charles Chaput, O.F.M., Cap. will lead a prayer service and bless the new Mater Dei Catholic School. Mater Dei Catholic School is a new regional school formed from the mergers of Saint Rose of Lima School in North Wales (Montgomery County) and Saint Stanislaus School in Lansdale (Montgomery County).

Tuesday, September 11, 2012 at 8:00 a.m.
Little Flower Catholic High School for Girls, 1000 West Lycoming Street, Philadelphia, PA 19140-2199
In celebration of the Mayor's Education Month, The Honorable Michael A. Nutter, Mayor of Philadelphia, Carol A. Cary, Ed. D., Superintendent of Secondary Schools and H. Edward Hanway, Chairman of the Faith in the Future Foundation, will address Little Flower students, focusing on the importance of education, service, setting goals and working hard. Following the presentation, Mayor Nutter, Mr. Hanway and Dr. Cary will tour the school and visit with students.

Recent Major Announcements Regarding Catholic Education


Faith in the Future Foundation Announcement:
On August 21, 2012 the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and the Faith and the Future Foundation, announced that an agreement-in-principle had been reached to create an independently managed Catholic school system encompassing 17 high schools within the Archdiocese as well as its four schools of special education. The Foundation will assume strategic and operational management of these 21 Archdiocesan schools effective September 1, 2012 and focus on major fundraising, enrollment management, marketing and cultivating best practices in leadership and education.

New High School Presidents:
In early August 2012, the Office of Catholic Education announced the appointments of three new presidents to lead Bishop McDevitt High School (Wyncote, Montgomery County), Saint Hubert Catholic High School for Girls (Northeast Philadelphia), and Pope John Paul II High School (Royersford, Montgomery County).

Mr. Stephen Finley, Sr. brings with him over 16 years of business management and executive experience from Merck to Bishop McDevitt High School. Mr. Finely also has significant fundraising experience having served as co-chair of the Bishop McDevitt High School Science 2000 Project for new labs and two terms as co-chair of the Parents Annual Giving Fund.

Mr. Francis Farrell comes to Saint Hubert Catholic High School for Girls from Manor College where he was Division Chair of the Liberal Arts School. Mr. Farrell has great strengths in strategic planning.

Prior to being named the President of Pope John Paul II High School, Dr. Louis Giuliano was the Assistant Director of Educational Financial Services for the Office of Catholic Education for the past 22 years. Dr. Giuliano has also taught in the Graduate Programs of Thomas Jefferson University and Villanova University.

Announcement of New Superintendents of Secondary and Elementary Schools:
On July 19, 2012, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia Office of Catholic Education announced two new Superintendents: Dr. Carol Cary, the Superintendent of Secondary Schools, and Ms. Jacqueline Coccia, the Superintendent of Elementary Schools. Dr. Carol Cary brings more than 20 years of experience to her new role. Previously, Dr. Cary was the Director of Secondary Curriculum, Instruction and Professional Development for almost five years in the Office of Catholic Education (OCE), where she was responsible for supervising the academic administrators and the curriculum committee members; identifying and implementing strategic initiatives resulting in student achievement gains, increased professional development and student-centered approaches to learning.

Ms. Coccia brings 13 years of experience in Catholic education to her new role, most recently as the Director of Elementary Education. Ms. Coccia's responsibilities included coordinating strategic planning efforts for OCE and the Office of Catechetical Formation, assisting elementary school principals in the implementation of the Common Core State Standards, providing support to pastors, principals, teachers and parish and regional elementary schools, and mentoring first-and second-year principals.

Dr. Cary and Ms. Coccia were chosen to lead the Archdiocese's 17 high schools and 123 elementary schools respectively through an exhaustive search process that included consultation from Dr. John DeFlaminis, Executive Director of the Penn Center for Educational Leadership, and Mr. Edward Hanway, Chairman of the Faith in the Future Foundation.

Highlights from Archdiocesan Schools:
For the fifth year, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will welcome guest teachers from China, who will teach Mandarin Chinese to students in Archdiocesan High Schools. These guest teachers will provide Mandarin instruction at Lansdale Catholic High School in Lansdale (Montgomery County), Bishop Shanahan High School in Downingtown (Chester County), Roman Catholic High School for Boys in Philadelphia, Little Flower High School for Girls in Philadelphia, Cardinal O'Hara High School in Springfield (Delaware County) and John W. Hallahan Catholic Girls' High School, Philadelphia. This program is in conjunction with the College Board and Hanban.

The International Studies program at West Philadelphia Catholic High School has been given the 2012 Outstanding Program of Excellence award by the Pennsylvania Council for the Social Studies. This is West Philadelphia Catholic High School's 10th year in the program. The award will be presented in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania in October 2012. Program directors as well as representatives of the school administration and students whose projects and accomplishments have made the program so successful. The student projects include the creation of websites, documentary videos and a self-published book.

Upcoming Event:
Thursday, October 11, 2012 at 6:00 p.m.
Crystal Tea Room, Wanamaker Building, Broad and Juniper Streets, Philadelphia, PA 19107

The Distinguished Graduate/Hall of Fame event will honor the following five individuals who exemplify what a Catholic School graduate should be. Mr. Tim Chambers, Director, Screenwriter, Producer, The Mighty Macs; Chief Executive Officer, Tango Traffic; Partner, Quaker Media and Graduate of Cardinal O'Hara High School, Delaware County. Mr. Gerald P. Cuddy, President and Chief Executive Officer, Beneficial Bank; Graduate of Saint Bernadette of Lourdes School, Drexel Hill, Delaware County and Monsignor Bonner High School, Drexel Hill, Delaware County. Mr. James Hirschmann, Jr., Chief Executive Officer, Western Asset Management Co. and graduate of Archbishop Wood High School, Warminster, Bucks County. Ms. Jane Metzler, Anchor/Reporter Fox News Radio and graduate of Bishop McDevitt High School, Wyncote, Montgomery County. Brother Richard Kestler, FSC, President of West Philadelphia Catholic High School and graduate of La Salle College High School, Wyndmoor, Montgomery County. For more information about this event, please visit www.PromiseFulfilled.org.

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Editor's Note: For more information about schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia please visit www.catholicschools-phl.org. For information about the Faith in the Future Foundation please visit www.faithinthefuture.com/splash/


Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Pope Benedict Xvi Bestows Upon Mary E. Rochford The Highest Papal Honor A Layperson Can Obtain Former Archdiocesan Superintendent Of Schools Named A Dame Of Saint Gregory

September 6, 2012

POPE BENEDICT XVI BESTOWS UPON MARY E. ROCHFORD
THE HIGHEST PAPAL HONOR A LAYPERSON CAN OBTAIN

Former Archdiocesan Superintendent of Schools Named a Dame of Saint Gregory


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. announced today that Ms. Mary E. Rochford, former Superintendent of Schools for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, has been named to the pontifical Order of Saint Gregory the Great by Pope Benedict XVI.

This is one of the highest honors the Holy Father can bestow on an individual. This honor is in recognition not only for Ms. Rochford's service to the Archdiocese of Philadelphia but also continuing witness of lay leadership. In a letter to Ms. Rochford, Archbishop Chaput said, "Mary, you are a source of great pride for our Archdiocese. Thank you for your service to Jesus Christ and his Church. You honor us all."

The Order of St. Gregory the Great, one of the five pontifical knightly orders, was founded by Pope Gregory XVI in 1831 to honor his great Sixth Century predecessor. In the nearly 200 years since, the Holy Father has awarded it to diplomats, artists, composers, scholars and scientists; political, military and economic leaders; philanthropists, interfaith leaders and other persons from all walks of life who have shown, by their sustained service, extraordinary love for Jesus Christ and his Church. Membership in the order incurs no obligations. It is strictly a recognition from the Holy Father himself for service already rendered and an invitation from His Holiness to continue a life of exemplary Christian witness.

Ms. Rochford tendered her resignation as Superintendent in March 2012 in order to devote time to providing physical care for members of her family unable to do so on their own. She had served in the Office of Catholic Education since 1999 and as Superintendent of Schools since 2008.

A product of Catholic education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, Ms. Rochford graduated from the former-Saint Athanasius Parish Elementary School and the former-Cardinal Dougherty High School. She then went on to earn a Bachelor's Degree in Elementary Education from Chestnut Hill College and a Master of Arts Degree in Catholic School Leadership and Administration from Boston College. Prior to joining the Office of Catholic Education in August of 1999, she served as a Catholic school teacher and administrator for over 25 years.

For a photo gallery of today's announcement please visit www.catholicphilly.com/.


Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput Marks First Anniversary With Letter To Parishioners

September 7, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT MARKS FIRST ANNIVERSARY
WITH LETTER TO PARISHIONERS


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. is marking his first anniversary as Archbishop of Philadelphia with a letter to the almost 1.5 million parishioners in the Archdiocese. The letter, dated September 8, 2012, will be read, distributed or made available at the 257 parishes of the Archdiocese this weekend.

A Letter to the People of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia


Dear friends in Christ,

Exactly one year ago, on September 8, I began my service as your Archbishop. Over the past 12 months, many of you have written to me with your encouragement and support. Your kindness in the face of so many difficulties for our Church has reminded me again and again of the goodness of the people of this Archdiocese. There is no place I would rather be serving than here, now, among you. I'm very grateful for your generosity to me personally; but far more importantly, I thank you for your fidelity to Jesus Christ and his Church.

I've also heard very clearly the confusion and anger of many of our people. I accept those feelings gratefully as well, because they're honest, and they're warranted. Events of the past decade have wounded the whole Church. They've placed an undeserved burden on all of you as believers. I cannot undo mistakes and evil actions in the past, but I do apologize for them with all my heart. And I regret that the weight of those failures has been carried by you. In the time God gives me as your Archbishop, I will do everything I can to ensure that the life of this Archdiocese in the future is worthy of the love and trust of our people.

I've spent much of the past year learning the life of the Archdiocese and getting to know our parishes and people. In a diocese of this size, with such a great history, there's still so much to learn and so many good people I do not yet know. I look forward to being with you more and more frequently in the months and years ahead because the life of the Church is in her parishes, and the real joy of a bishop is in the time he spends there with his people.

Unfortunately the problems facing our local Church remain grave. At the archdiocesan level, along with continuing legal challenges, we have serious budget deficit and liquidity issues. Many of our parishes continue to struggle financially. Many of those parishes simply can't be sustained.

We can and will remedy these problems. In the long run, we do have the resources to rebuild the pastoral and financial health of this Church. We have excellent new financial leadership at the senior levels of the Archdiocese. Many of our people and major donors have expressed new confidence in the Church, and this year's Catholic Charities Appeal is doing wel
I'm determined to steward the resources entrusted to the Church by our people as prudently and transparently as possible. We've greatly strengthened our procedures to prevent the sexual abuse of minors. We remain strongly committed to helping victims of abuse to heal. And I've been deeply gratified by the thousands of Catholic school families and business community leaders who have fought hard and creatively this year to revitalize our Catholic education apostolate.

We have every reason to hope, and every reason to celebrate the Year of Faith, which begins next month, with energy, enthusiasm and confidence in the future. The Year of Faith offers all of us a chance to deepen our relationship with God's Son, with his Church and with one another.

The task of renewal will require deep changes in the thinking, behaviors, structures, procedures and organizational life of the diocese. We can no longer allow ourselves the complacency of the past. "The way things have always been" needs to become "the way things need to be" if we have any hope of preaching Jesus Christ to the world around us. This is the only reason the Church exists.

In the years ahead, we need to speak the truth to each other with charity and respect - but also candidly, and without fear. This is the spirit that should animate every level of our Church life, including every pastoral council and finance council in every one of our parishes. No one "owns" the Church: not the bishops; not the clergy; and not our people. She belongs to Jesus Christ and to him alone. But all of us in different ways, no matter what our vocation, have responsibility for the Church and her mission. We need to hold ourselves and each other accountable for living the faith with clean hearts and genuine zeal. The mark of mature Christian discipleship is honesty tempered with love.

Please know that I love you as my family in faith, and pray for you daily and thank God for you. I ask you to remember me in your prayers as well, because I need them. May God bless you and all those you love. And may God guide the Church with his wisdom, mercy and justice in the year ahead.

Sincerely yours in Jesus Christ,

+Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.
Archbishop of Philadelphia


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Editor's Note: For more information visit www.archphila.org. For the Archbishop's bio visit http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/ACJC_Biography.pdf.



Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Justice, Terrance Williams And The Death Penalty

September 10, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
JUSTICE, TERRANCE WILLIAMS AND THE DEATH PENALTY


Even when a defendant is well defended, properly tried and justly found guilty, experience shows that capital punishment simply doesn't work as a deterrent. Nor does it heal or redress any wounds, because only forgiveness can do that. It does succeed though in answering violence with violence -- a violence wrapped in the piety of state approval, which implicates all of us as citizens in the taking of more lives.

Turning away from capital punishment does not diminish our support for the families of murder victims. They bear a terrible burden of grief, and they rightly demand justice. Real murderers deserve punishment; but even properly tried and justly convicted murderers - men and women who are found guilty of heinous crimes -- retain their God-given dignity as human beings. When we take a murderer's life we only add to the violence in an already violent culture, and we demean our own dignity in the process.

Both Scripture and Catholic tradition support the legitimacy of the death penalty under certain limited conditions. But the Church has repeatedly called us to a higher road over the past five decades. We don't need to kill people to protect society or punish the guilty. And we should never be eager to take anyone's life. As a result, except in the most extreme circumstances, capital punishment cannot be justified. In developed countries like our own, it should have no place in our public life.

Last month here in Pennsylvania, execution warrants were signed for four men. A judge stayed one of the execution warrants, but the three remaining warrants could potentially result in the first execution in our state in 13 years. One of the cases in which appeals seem to be exhausted involves Terrance Williams. In October, Williams is scheduled to die by lethal injection for the murder of Amos Norwood in 1984, a crime committed when he was 18 and a college freshman. Williams is indisputably guilty of the crime. He's also mentally competent. His defense attorneys argue that he was repeatedly sexually abused as a youth, including five years of abuse at the hands of the man he murdered, and that this helped motivate his violence. The state counters that all of Williams' claims -- including claims of sexual abuse -- have had proper judicial review and been rejected.

Terrance Williams deserves punishment. No one disputes that. But he doesn't need to die to satisfy justice. We should think very carefully in the coming days about the kind of justice we want to witness to our young people. Most American Catholics, like many of their fellow citizens, support the death penalty. That doesn't make it right. But it does ensure that the wrong-headed lesson of violence "fixing" the violent among us will be taught to another generation.

As children of God, we're better than this, and we need to start acting like it. We need to end the death penalty now.

The Archbishop strongly encourages readers to contact the Pennsylvania Board of Pardons, urging them to recommend commutation of Williams' sentence to life in prison. Please also contact the Office of the Governor and urge the Governor to accept a clemency recommendation from the board, or, in its absence, to order a temporary reprieve. Use the Catholic Advocacy Network at www.pacatholic.org to send an email to the Board of Pardons and the Governor. Or call or write them at:

Pennsylvania Board of Pardons, 333 Market Street, 15th Floor, Harrisburg, PA 17126; phone: 717.787.2596.

The Honorable Tom Corbett, Governor of Pennsylvania, The Capitol, Harrisburg, PA 17120; phone: 717.787.2500.


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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Saint Martha Manor Resident Celebrates 100th Birthday With A Hot Air Balloon Ride

September 11, 2012

SAINT MARTHA MANOR RESIDENT CELEBRATES
100TH BIRTHDAY WITH A HOT AIR BALLOON RIDE

Miriam Krause's wish to celebrate her 100th birthday by going on a hot air balloon ride will come true this Tuesday thanks to the Twilight Wish Foundation. The Twilight Wish Foundation, based in Doylestown, Bucks County, grants wishes for seniors across the country. Miriam is a resident of Saint Martha Manor of Catholic Health Care Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

The balloon launch (weather permitting) is scheduled for:

Tuesday, September 11, 2012
6:45 a.m.
Pottstown Municipal Airport
1149 Glasgow Street
Pottstown, PA 19464


A hot air balloon themed birthday party is scheduled for all 100 year old residents and other centenarians at 2:00 p.m. at Saint Martha Manor.

Saint Martha Manor opened in 1989 by the Felician Sisters under the auspices of Catholic Health Care Services. Since its founding, Saint Martha Manor, a 120 bed skilled nursing home, has served Downingtown and the surrounding communities in Chester County.
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Editor's Note: For more information on Saint Martha Manor visit stmarthamanor.org.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Some Thoughts On Catholic Faith And Public Life

September 14, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
SOME THOUGHTS ON CATHOLIC FAITH AND PUBLIC LIFE


As we enter another election season, it's important to remember that the way we lead our public lives needs to embody what the Catholic faith teaches -- not what our personalized edition of Christianity feels comfortable with, but the real thing; the full package; what the Church actually holds to be true. In other words, we need to be Catholics first and political creatures second.

The more we transfer our passion for Jesus Christ to some political messiah or party platform, the more bitter we feel toward his Church when she speaks against the idols we set up in our own hearts. There's no more damning moment in all of Scripture than John 19:15: "We have no king but Caesar."

The only king Christians have is Jesus Christ. The obligation to seek and serve the truth belongs to each of us personally. The duty to love and help our neighbor belongs to each of us personally. We can't ignore or delegate away these personal duties to anyone else or any government agency. More than 1,600 years ago, St. Basil the Great warned his wealthy fellow Christians that "The bread you possess belongs to the hungry. The clothing you store in boxes belongs to the naked." St. John Chrysostom, Basil's equally great contemporary, preached exactly the same message: "God does not want golden vessels but golden hearts," and "for those who neglect their neighbor, a hell awaits with an inextinguishable fire in the company of the demons."

What was true then is true now. Hell is not a metaphor. Hell is real. Jesus spoke about it many times and without any ambiguity. If we do not help the poor, we'll go to hell. I'll say it again: If we do not help the poor, we will go to hell.

And who are the poor? They're the people we so often try to look away from -- people who are homeless or dying or unemployed or mentally disabled. They're also the unborn child who has a right to God's gift of life, and the single mother who looks to us for compassion and material support. Above all, they're the persons in need that God presents to each of us not as a "policy issue," but right here, right now, in our daily lives.

Thomas of Villanova, the great Augustinian saint for whom Villanova University is named, is remembered for his skills as a scholar and reforming bishop. But even more important was his passion for serving the poor, and his zeal for penetrating the entire world around him with the virtues of justice and Christian love.

Time matters. God will hold us accountable for the way we use it. All of us who call ourselves Christians share the same vocation to love God first and above all things; and to love our neighbor as ourselves. We're citizens of heaven first; but we have obligations here. We're Catholics and Christians first. And if we live that way -- zealously and selflessly in our public lives -- our country will be the better for it; and God will use us to help make the world new.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.htm.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Update Regarding Reverend Michael Chapman

September 17, 2012

UPDATE REGARDING
REVEREND MICHAEL CHAPMAN


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., has placed Reverend Michael Chapman on administrative leave following allegations of sexual abuse of minors. Father Chapman, Pastor of Ascension of Our Lord Parish in Philadelphia, was originally placed on leave in March 2011 for an alleged violation of The Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries.

After investigation of the alleged Standards violation by the Multi-Disciplinary Team, and evaluation by the Archdiocesan Review Board, Archbishop Chaput found Father Chapman suitable for ministry in May 2012. As part of the Honesty, Healing and Hope in Christ parish restoration initiative, the Office for Child and Youth protection was working with the parish to prepare for his return. Before Father Chapman's return, the Archdiocese received allegations of sexual abuse of minors against Father Chapman in May 2012. The abuse reportedly occurred approximately thirty years ago. The Archdiocese immediately reported the new allegations to law enforcement and delayed Father Chapman's return to the parish. Since the allegations were received, Father Chapman has not been exercising his ministry publicly or residing at an Archdiocesan parish. After an initial investigation by the Archdiocesan Office for Investigations, the Archbishop placed Father Chapman on administrative leave.

An announcement was made at Ascension of Our Lord Parish this past weekend and counselors were available.

Father Chapman is 56 years old. He was ordained in 1982. He served at the following parishes, schools, and offices: Saint Bonaventure, Philadelphia (1982-1986); Little Flower High School(1983-1985); Saint Agnes, West Chester (1986-1990); Saint Henry, Philadelphia (1990-1991); Priest Vocation Coordinator for the Hispanic Apostolate (1990-1994); Hispanic MinistryCoordinator for Montgomery County (1991-1992); Saint Veronica, Philadelphia (1994-1999); Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul (1999-2001); Ascension of Our Lord, Philadelphia (2001-2011); placed on administrative leave (2011).

If you would like to report a violation of The Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries, contact the Archdiocesan Office for Investigations at 1-888-930-9010.

If you would like to report an allegation of sexual abuse, contact your local law enforcement agency and/or the Office for Investigations at 1-888-930-9010.

We recognize that this public notice may be painful to victims of sexual violence. If you need support or assistance, victim services are available to you through the Victim Assistance Office of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia at 1-888-800-8780 or philavac@adphila.org.

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Editor's Note: On May 4th, Archbishop Chaput announced resolutions to eight of the 26 cases of priests on administrative leave as a result of the February 2011 Grand Jury report. For more background visit http://archphila.org/HHHIC/hhhic.php


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Saint John's Hospice Marks 50 Years Of Service To The Homeless In Philadelphia This Agency Of Catholic Social Services Has Served More Than 6 Million Men

September 18, 2012

SAINT JOHN'S HOSPICE MARKS 50 YEARS
OF SERVICE TO THE HOMELESS IN PHILADELPHIA

This Agency of Catholic Social Services Has Served More than 6 Million Men


Saint John's Hospice is marking its 50th year of service to Philadelphia's male homeless population. It is a center grounded in faith and service, where homeless persons find dignity, respect, nourishment and opportunities for new beginnings.

Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, OFM, Cap. said, "Saint John's Hospice is a blessing to all of us in Philadelphia. As a Church, we are blessed that Saint John's has helped us all keep our eyes on the simple but easily forgotten imperative to serve the needy among us. I extend to the entire Saint John's Hospice family my blessing and best wishes as they begin their 50th anniversary celebration."

The yearlong celebration kicked off with a fundraising gala on Saturday, September 8, 2012 at Galdo's Catering in South Philadelphia. Bishop Timothy C. Senior, along with other distinguished guests, staff and friends attended. All proceeds generated from the evening went to support Saint John's Hospice.

Founded in September of 1963, Saint John's offers a daily lunch program currently serving an average of 350 men each day. In addition to offering showers, clothing and personal hygiene articles, Saint John's offers a mail program for the homeless men, which allows them to register Saint John's Hospice as an address so they can receive mail regularly. Currently more than 900 men participate in this program.

The facility, which is staffed by 35 full and part-time employees, includes a 52-bed shelter for homeless men, including 12 beds specifically for those men in need of medical attention. St. John's Hospice also hosts 25 chronically homeless men who typically avoid shelter to come into the safety of Saint John's "yard" for the night. The men are provided beverages, snacks, restrooms and most importantly the opportunity to interact positively with a Saint John's staff member. Major funding for the services provided at comes from private donations. The parishes of the Archdiocese are the main source of donated food. Parishioners prepare casseroles, which are heated and served each day. Saint John's is also largely dependent on donated food and hygiene items as well as the time of volunteers.

"Saint John's Hospice is one of the most comprehensive operations to assist the homeless population in the City of Philadelphia," says Kevin Barr, Program Director. "In all these services, we go beyond meeting basic and physical needs. We strive to provide the dignity and respect that offers each of our guests the strength to break out of homelessness-the ultimate goal for all of the men who use our services."

St. John's Hospice offers the men the option to take advantage of counseling services, which can help them actively address the issues they face as individuals through weekly individual and group meetings with their case manager. The hospice's staff also coordinates monitored attendance in substance abuse and mental health treatment, and referral to education, employment and other needed resources and services.

Our ministry is one of openness, acceptance and transition," said Gerry Huot, Community Relations Director. Our service is an integral part of who we are as a Church. We are blessed to enable so many in our community and to have donors and partners to help those in need. This has been our legacy for 50 years and I hope the next 50 bring this same steadfast commitment to the needy and homeless among us."

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Editor's Note: For more information on Saint John's Hospice visit http://www.saintjohnshospice.org.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Responds To New Civil Lawsuits

September 18, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE RESPONDS TO NEW CIVIL LAWSUITS


We have not received copies of the cases that the plaintiffs have said they intend to file, so we cannot provide more detailed information on those particular lawsuits at this time. We believe lawsuits are not the best mechanism to promote healing in the context of the very private and difficult circumstances of sexual abuse. We will work to assure all victims of sexual abuse receive appropriate assistance.

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Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Remembering Why Our Time, And Our Lives, Matter

September 21, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
REMEMBERING WHY OUR TIME, AND OUR LIVES, MATTER


Writing in about the year 116, the pagan historian Tacitus described a fringe group of religious blasphemers who lived in Rome under the emperor Nero. They refused to honor the gods. They engaged in "superstitious abominations" and worshiped a crucified criminal. They were blamed for Rome's great fire in A.D. 64, and as a result, they were hunted down and put to death.

Three hundred years later, they were the official religion of the Roman state.

Numbers can be misleading. They're never the best way to measure the health of the Christian faith. The Church in Rome's catacombs was small. But she was stronger than any of her critics or persecutors. And that's as true today as it was in the time of Tacitus. A century ago, sub-Saharan Africa had fewer than 2 million Christians. Today it has more than 130 million. That's a growth rate of nearly 7,000 percent. We live in a supposedly "post-Christian" age. But Christianity is alive and growing rapidly across the entire Southern Hemisphere - arguably faster than any other religion in the world, including Islam.

That's the good news. Of course, there's another side to history.

In A.D. 600, the Mediterranean world had hundreds of thriving Christian communities. Around that time, two Greek monks, John Moschos and Sophronius, began a pilgrimage. They went to Egypt, Jerusalem and around the great Middle East heartland of Christianity. They wrote a journal called The Spiritual Meadow. A best seller in its day, and still a Christian classic, it was a kind of spiritual travelogue -- a record of the wisdom, visions and stories from the historic center of the Christian faith.

John Moschos died in the year 619, unaware of an obscure Arab holy man named Mohammed. Within a hundred years, Muslim armies had overrun all of the Middle East, North Africa and most of Spain. Today, St Augustine's diocese of Hippo is a Muslim town in Algeria. In Iraq, Saddam Hussein's hometown of Tikrit was once a center of Christian scholarship. In the birthplace of Christianity, after centuries under Islam, Christian minorities face discrimination and frequent violence. They barely manage to survive.

Here's my point. Jesus said the gates of hell would never prevail against his Church, and his word is good. But he didn't promise anything about our local real estate and institutions. The Canadian scholar Douglas Farrow once wrote that "St. Peter will have his successors until the Lord comes, but his successors may not always have St. Peter's." In other words, God is faithful -- but he makes no guarantees about infrastructure or the status quo or even our next breath.

Human beings make history, not the other way around. This is why each of our lives matters. God is love; a God of life and deliverance and joy. He made us to be happy with him; to be loved by him; and to bring others to know his love. That's the glory of being alive. That's the grandeur of being a disciple of Jesus Christ.

The task of preaching and teaching, growing and living the Catholic faith in our time, in this country, belongs to you and me. No one else can do it. The future depends on God, but he builds it with the living stones we give him by the example of our lives.

So today, tomorrow, and in the coming Year of Faith -- which begins in just a few weeks -- we need to remember the words of the Epistle of James: "Be doers of [God's] word and not hearers only, deceiving yourselves" (Jas 1:22).

We live for the glory of God, and we prove it in the love we show to each other.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Announces Philadelphia Parish Closure Resulting From Pastoral Planning Initiative Ascension Of Our Lord Parish In Philadelphia To Close Effective October 1st

September 25, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE ANNOUNCES PHILADELPHIA PARISH CLOSURE
RESULTING FROM PASTORAL PLANNING INITIATIVE

Ascension of Our Lord Parish in Philadelphia to Close Effective October 1st


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced today that Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has approved the recommendation of the Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee to close Ascension of Our Lord Parish in the Harrowgate section of Philadelphia after a study lasting several months.

Parishioners of the former Ascension of Our Lord Parish will be welcomed at either Holy Innocents Parish (approximately 1.7 miles away) or Visitation, B.V.M. Parish (approximately 0.9 miles away). These parishes will divide responsibility for all of the assets, debts, buildings and sacramental records of the former-Ascension of Our Lord Parish. Due to serious issues with the physical condition of the Ascension of Our Lord church building, it had not been utilized for quite some time. Masses were being celebrated in the parish rectory and the former school building due to safety issues with the church building and low Mass attendance. The church will not be maintained as a worship site due to lack of funds for needed physical improvements, which are estimated to cost at least $3 million.

This closure is part of the ongoing restructuring efforts, which began in 2011, that will ultimately strengthen parish communities positioning them for future growth and sustainability across the five-county Archdiocese. It is hoped that the end result will be revitalized parishes throughout the Archdiocese that are better equipped to meet the spiritual and pastoral needs of future generations.

Parishioners previously learned of this final decision through recent announcements at weekend Masses. This closure, which is effective October 1st, was based on a combination of factors, including, but not limited to history of declining Mass attendance and sacramental activity, increasing economic challenges that threaten sustainability, a decrease in the availability of clergy to staff parishes, and the deteriorated condition of facilities.

The Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee, made up of lay persons, priests and Archdiocesan personnel, is examining all 257 parishes within the Archdiocese to gauge their viability and assess whether they possess the resources to accomplish their role in the mission of the Church and remain sustainable and vibrant faith communities. Parishes within each pastoral planning area will continue to carefully and thoughtfully examine their viability in order to make future recommendations. Additional parish announcements are expected in the spring of 2013 and 2014.

Parish Area Pastoral Planning is designed to be as collaborative and consultative as possible. Its goal is to provide pastors, after consulting their parish leadership, with the opportunity to dialogue with members of the Strategic Planning Committee in providing joint recommendations to the Archbishop for growth and sustainability within their respective geographic areas.


The recommendations of the Archdiocesan Strategic Planning Committee are shared with the Council of Priests and the College of Consultors for their review before a final decision is made by the Archbishop.

Background on Parish Announcement Effective October 1, 2012


Ascension of Our Lord Parish (Philadelphia)
A parish is always more than statistics as they do not represent the whole of parish life. The figures presented below were only one part of the larger picture when developing the recommendation for closure of the parish. They do, however, provide a snapshot of a parish's sacramental activity and a gauge to project stability, growth or decline.

Ascension of Our Lord Parish:
Year 2007 2011
Infant Baptisms 17 7
Marriages 4 2
Weekend Mass attendance 391 188



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Editor's Note: The Archdiocese of Philadelphia is comprised of 44 Pastoral Planning Areas (PPAs). It is expected that the first 22 PPAs will complete the work of planning and implementation over the next two years and that additional two years will be required for the remainder of the PPAs. For more information on the Parish Area Pastoral Planning, please visit www.archphila.org.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia's Dr. Robert Miller To Receive Prestigious Rev. Louis J. Luzbetak, Svd, Award Dr. Miller Receives National Honor For A Lifetime Of Exemplary Church Research

September 26, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA'S DR. ROBERT MILLER TO RECEIVE
PRESTIGIOUS REV. LOUIS J. LUZBETAK, SVD, AWARD

Dr. Miller Receives National Honor For a Lifetime of Exemplary Church Research


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia is proud to announce that on October 16, 2012 Dr. Robert Miller, Director of Planning and Research for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, will be presented with the prestigious Rev. Louis J. Luzbetak, SVD, Award for his extraordinary efforts in the area of research on behalf of the Church.

The award, given annually by the Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate (CARA) at Georgetown University, honors a researcher who has made a significant lifetime contribution to research in the Catholic Church. Dr. Miller is being recognized for setting a national standard of excellence in his efforts to support the Archdiocese of Philadelphia's 1.4 million Catholics in 257 parishes across five counties.

"We are so blessed to have Dr. Miller and his expertise at the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, and we are overjoyed to see him honored for his service," said Bishop Timothy Senior. "He has helped our diocese develop an information management system, promote effective parish self-studies, facilitate inter-parish collaborative planning, and use research and planning in broad consultative processes to achieve reorganization. His contributions can be felt by all of the Catholics in the Philadelphia region, and his work here has helped to shape the research and planning of other dioceses across the country"

Prior to his work with the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, Miller was the Dean for Continuing Education at Philadelphia University, and Assistant to the Dean for the College of Business at Drexel University in Philadelphia where he also held teaching positions. He also served on the faculty at Rider University in Lawrenceville, NJ. He has served as a member of adjunct faculties at Eastern University, Saint Joseph's University, Villanova University, Thomas Jefferson University School of Graduate Study, the University of Phoenix, and the Church Ministry Program of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. His education, leadership, and prior experience have made him an integral part of the Steering Committee for Archdiocesan Pastoral Planning, the Planning Committee of the Board of Education, and most recently the Archdiocesan Blue Ribbon for the Commission on Catholic Education.

In addition to his impressive service within the archdiocese, he has contributed to the Church as a board member of the Center for Study of Church Management at Villanova University and the Conference for Pastoral Planning and Council Development. In 2003, he was named a Knight of the Order of St. Gregory the Great for meritorious service by His Holiness, Pope John Paul II.

Bishop Gerald F. Kicanas of Tucson, chairman of CARA's Board of Directors, will present Miller with the Rev. Louis J. Luzbetak, SVD, Award on October 16th at Georgetown University.

Bob earned his doctorate from Temple University in the area of Leadership. He holds an MBA from Drexel University and a Bachelor's degree from LaSalle University. He has also done post graduate work at the School of Education, Harvard University and the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in the area of leadership. He and his wife Sherry of 37 years have three grown children and are active members of Saint James Parish, Elkins Park (Montgomery County) where he serves as a consultant to the parish pastoral council.

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Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: How We Got Where We Are, And The Value Of The Past

September 27, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
HOW WE GOT WHERE WE ARE, AND THE VALUE OF THE PAST


"The failure of medieval Christendom was not a function of the demonstrated or demonstrable falsity of central doctrinal truth claims of the Christian faith . . . It was, at root, a botching of moral execution, a failure to practice what was preached."

-- Brad Gregory, "The Unintended Reformation"

"We are waiting, not for another political savior or television personality, but for a Dominic or a Francis, an Ignatius or a Wesley, a Wilberforce or a Newman, a Bonhoeffer or a Solzhenitsyn. Only sanctity can justify Christianity's existence; only sanctity can make the case for faith; only sanctity, or the hope thereof, can ultimately redeem the world."

-- Ross Douthat, "Bad Religion"


In early September, the Gallup Organization found that 60 percent of Americans - a record high -- have little or no trust in the mass media's ability "to report the news fully, accurately and fairly." The sharpest decline in trust occurred among political independents, the least partisan American voters.

This isn't much of a surprise. Media coverage of religion, for example, has been eroding in both quality and fairness for years, as tracked by excellent web sites like getreligion.org. But the shift to social advocacy and the decay of professional standards have hurt the credibility of journalism on a whole range of issues. For Gallup, the trend "poses a challenge to democracy and to creating a fully engaged citizenry."

Why should this matter for Catholics? Two reasons. First, especially in an election year, we need to bring a healthy dose of skepticism to what we read in The New York Times or Newsweek magazine. We need to do the same in watching CNN, Fox or MSNBC. On disputed moral and social issues, none of these press organizations is, on its own, an adequate source of good information. Each has its biases. And too often those biases include a disdain for Catholic belief.

Second, today's news media are, in a sense, victims of their own urgency; crippled by their appetite for the next breaking story. But we can't understand the present climate in our country without understanding the past. Politics is important. How we vote in November will help choose the course of our nation, for good or ill. But as Christians, our story began long before this campaign season. It will continue long after. Our task is to reform our own lives even as we witness Jesus Christ to the world -- not just by our words, but by our actions. We can't do that alone, as freelancers. Catholic discipleship is a life in community, the community we know as the Church, guided by her teachings.

Over the past few months, two books have left a deep impression on how I see the world we Christians today are called to evangelize. Each illuminates the present through the lens of the past.

The first (Bad Religion), by columnist Ross Douthat, traces the course of Christianity in American history especially since World War II. "While the United States remains a deeply religious country," Douthat writes, real Christian faith has gradually been displaced by forms of spirituality tailored to personal convenience, with devastating results. The second (The Unintended Reformation), by historian Brad Gregory, follows the step by step growth of today's aggressive unbelief and moral confusion from the breakup of Christian unity in the Protestant-Catholic struggles of the early modern era.

Neither book is anything like a voter's guide. Neither is "political" in any practical sense. But for any reader who wants to understand how we got to the conflicted moral landscape of the world we now inhabit, these two extraordinary books are a great place to start. In helping to explain the present, they help us see the kind of Christian charity and witness we need to shape the future. That makes them invaluable.

Ross Douthat, "Bad Religion: How We Became a Nation of Heretics," Free Press, New York, 2012; and Brad S. Gregory, "The Unintended Reformation: How a Religious Revolution Secularized Society," Harvard University Press, Cambridge, MA, 2012.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Update Regarding La Milagrosa, The Miraculous Medal Chapel

September 28, 2012

UPDATE REGARDING LA MILAGROSA,
THE MIRACULOUS MEDAL CHAPEL


The Archdiocese recently became aware that the priests and brothers of the Congregation of the Mission, headquartered in Barcelona, Spain, intend to sell Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal Chapel, among other properties, in order to support their retired priests and brothers in Spain. Our Lady of the Miraculous Medal Chapel, best known in the Hispanic community as La Milagrosa is a Chapel of the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul located at 1903 Spring Garden Street in Philadelphia. The Archdiocese does not own the property and does not have the funds to purchase it.

An announcement containing this information was made at La Milagrosa this past Sunday. Representatives from the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul, along with the Office for Hispanic Catholics, will be meeting with members of the community to determine what plan of action will best fit their pastoral needs moving forward.

Masses will continue at La Milagrosa as scheduled for the time being as there is no time frame for the sale of the building.

The Archdiocese is keenly aware of the historic nature of the Chapel and the unique pastoral care it provides to the Hispanic Catholic community in the City of Philadelphia. The Cathedral welcomes La Milagrosa community with open arms and is prepared to hold a Spanish-language Mass each week.

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Editor's Note: La Milagrosa was founded on April 26, 1912 to serve the growing Hispanic community in the city. Graduates of its formation programs went on to become leaders in over three dozen parishes serving the Hispanic community. La Milagrosa is not connected to the Miraculous Medal Shrine, which is located in the Germantown section of Philadelphia.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Informe Sobre La Milagrosa, La Capilla De Nuestra Señora De La Medalla Milagrosa

September 28, 2012

INFORME SOBRE LA MILAGROSA,
LA CAPILLA DE NUESTRA SEÑORA DE LA MEDALLA MILAGROSA


La Arquidiócesis se enteró hace poco de que los sacerdotes y hermanos de la Congregación de la Misión, con sede en Barcelona, España, desean vender la Capilla de Nuestra Señora de la Medalla Milagrosa, entre otras propiedades, con el fin de apoyar a sus sacerdotes y hermanos religiosos jubilados en España. La Capilla de Nuestra Señora de la Medalla Milagrosa, mejor conocida en la comunidad hispana como La Milagrosa, es una capilla de la Basílica Catedral de San Pedro y San Pablo, ubicada en el 1903 de la calle Spring Garden en Filadelfia. La Arquidiócesis no es dueña de la propiedad y no tiene los fondos para comprarla.

Un anuncio conteniendo esta información fue hecho en La Milagrosa, el pasado domingo. Representantes de la Basílica Catedral de San Pedro y San Pablo, y de la Oficina para Católicos Hispanos, se reunirán con miembros de la comunidad para determinar cuál es el plan de acción que mejor servirá sus necesidades pastorales de aquí en adelante.

Las misas continuarán en La Milagrosa según programado por el momento ya que no hay un plazo para la venta del edificio.

La Arquidiócesis está muy consciente de la histórica naturaleza de la Capilla y el cuidado pastoral único que ofrece a la comunidad católica hispana en la ciudad de Filadelfia. La Catedral le da la bienvenida a la comunidad de La Milagrosa con los brazos abiertos y está preparada para celebrar una misa en español cada semana.

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Nota del Editor: La Milagrosa fue fundada el 26 de abril 1912 para servir a la creciente comunidad hispana en la ciudad. Los graduados de sus programas de formación pasaron a convertirse en líderes en más de tres docenas de parroquias que sirven a la comunidad hispana. La Milagrosa no está afiliada al Santuario de la Medalla Milagrosa, que está localizada en la sección de Germatown en Filadelfia.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Directador asociado de comunicaciones
215-587-3747

Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary To Host 3rd Annual Vianney Cup

September 28, 2012

Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary To Host
3rd Annual Vianney Cup


Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary will host the third annual Vianney Cup soccer tournament. Prior to the start of the tournament, Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., Archbishop of Philadelphia, will celebrate Mass at St. Martin's Chapel on Saint Charles' campus.

The teams competing for the Vianney Cup include the seminary communities of Mount Saint Mary's in Emmitsburg, Maryland, Saint Mary's in Baltimore, Theological College (The National Seminary of the Catholic University of America) and the host team, Saint Charles Borromeo.


Saturday, September 29, 2012
Mass: 8:30 a.m.
Game 1: 10:00 a.m.
Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary
100 East Wynnewood Road
Wynnewood, PA 19096



Following the Mass celebrated by Archbishop Chaput, the teams will take to the fields for game 1. Teams will play simultaneously at St. Charles Borromeo and St. Joseph's University fields. After the first game the tournament will close with Championship and Consolation Matches.

The day's festivities will conclude with Evening Prayer in Saint Martin's Chapel led by Bishop Timothy Senior, Rector of Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary.

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Editor's Note: For more information please contact Laura Jachetti at 610-785-6530 and visit http://www.scs.edu.


Contact
Bonnie Olinger
Communications Assistant
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Opens Year Of Faith The Year Of Faith Calls All Catholics To A Renewed Conversion To The Lord

October 5, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA OPENS YEAR OF FAITH

The Year of Faith calls all Catholics to a renewed conversion to the Lord


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., will open the Year of Faith in Philadelphia with a Mass at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul.

Sunday, October 14, 2012
6:30 p.m.
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


The Year of Faith commemorates the 50th anniversary of the opening of the Second Vatican Council which took place on October 11, 1962. It will conclude on the Feast of Christ the King on November 24, 2013. Pope Benedict XVI, in his Apostolic Letter, Porta Fidei, describes the Year of Faith as a time to reflect upon and renew our encounter with Jesus Christ.

Yearlong observance of the Year of Faith called for by Pope Benedict XVI includes:

Archdiocese of Philadelphia Catholic Life Congress
Saturday, November 17, 2012
An annual convocation of the laity, religious, deacons, and priests for ongoing faith formation. This year's theme is "Baptized in Christ: Live in the Joy of Believing." Archbishop Chaput will give a presentation titled: Renewing the Church and Her Mission in a 'Year of Faith.' The Keynote addresses will be given by Archbishop Jose H. Gomez of Los Angeles, CA (Spanish) and Dr. Jonathan Reyes (English). Doctor Jonathan Reyes was recently named, executive director of the Department of Justice, Peace and Human Development of the U. S. Conference of Catholic Bishops.

Public Witness of Faith
Parishes of the Archdiocese are invited to encourage parishioners to give public witness of faith throughout the Year of Faith. Some examples of public witness include: Marian Processions, outdoor Mass, outdoor prayer vigils, and rallies.

One Faith One Story
Monthly books with stories of faith of Christians who, throughout the ages, bore great witness to the joy of faith in Christ. The monthly book guide can be used for book clubs, adult faith formation, family reading at home, or personal faith enrichment. It's available online at archphila.org/yearoffaith/, in the Resources tab, under Guidebooks for Parishes.

Faith and Charity
Catholics are invited during the Year of Faith to celebrate the great Catholic tradition of charity. A guidebook offers assistance to parishes and individuals providing resources and suggestions for works of service. It's available online at archphila.org/yearoffaith/, in the Resources tab, under Guidebooks for Parishes.

Testimonies of Faith
Catholics of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will share their stories of faith in short videos that will be posted on the Year of Faith website. The first videos are expected to be posted towards the end of October.

A Time of Grace Parish Evangelization Formation Series
A three course formation series examining the major themes of the Year of Faith, Vatican II documents and other texts. Open to all in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. For more information email Meghan Cokeley at mcokeley@adphila.org

# # #


Editor's Note:
The Year of Faith Opening Mass on October 14th will be streamed live on the archdiocesan website archphila.org.

For more information on the above observances visit The Year of Faith website at archphila.org/yearoffaith.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialists
215-587-3747

The Faith In The Future Foundation Announces The Appointment Of Samuel Casey Carter As Its Chief Executive Officer A Nationally Recognized Thought Leader In Educational Best Practice, Mr. Carter Will Lead The First-of-its Kind Independently Managed Catholic School System

October 8, 2012

The Faith in the Future Foundation Announces the Appointment of
Samuel Casey Carter as its Chief Executive Officer

A nationally recognized thought leader in educational best practice, Mr. Carter will lead the first-of-its kind independently managed Catholic school system


(Philadelphia, October 8, 2012)- The Faith in the Future Foundation, a first-of-its-kind institution providing strategic management and operational oversight for 17 Catholic high schools and four schools of special education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, today announced the appointment of Samuel Casey Carter as Chief Executive Officer. Mr. Carter is a highly-respected and well-known school operator, industry thought leader, and longtime educational reformer whose appointment marks an important milestone for the Foundation.

Over the last two decades, Mr. Carter's career has been wholly dedicated to strengthening and improving all educational options, including local public, public charter, and Catholic schools. With a keen focus on elevating educational outcomes and managing to excellence in schools, Mr. Carter's experience also includes an active record of advocacy serving as an expert and testifying before more than 30 state legislatures on educational issues across the nation.

"Casey Carter is exactly the type of Chief Executive Officer I envisioned for Faith in the Future," said H. Edward Hanway, Chairman of the Faith in the Future Foundation. "Smart, strategic, experienced and passionate, Casey brings a fresh perspective, a desire to innovate and an abiding commitment to further elevating our already outstanding educational outcomes. Since February, I have often said that the Foundation must help our 21 schools to be 'individually excellent but better together,' and Casey's rich experience demonstrates the ability to accomplish exactly that."

Specifically, Mr. Carter ran his own consulting firm and provided strategic consulting to many of the best school operators including the Cristo Rey Network and KIPP, was president of National Heritage Academies, a charter school management company that operates more than 75 schools in nine states, president of CfBT USA-the U.S. affiliate of CfBT Education Trust, the head of global corporate social responsibility for Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and the executive director of the Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Foundation. Mr. Carter is also the author of On Purpose: How Great School Cultures Form Strong Character, which he wrote as a senior fellow for the Center for Education Reform, and No Excuses: Lessons from 21 High-Performing, High Poverty Schools. His articles, essays, and columns have appeared in more than 180 newspapers and magazines including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal and Los Angeles Times. A graduate of St. John's College in Annapolis, Maryland, Mr. Carter has also studied theology at Oxford University and philosophy at The Catholic University of America.

"This isn't simply a chance to transform the nation's oldest and largest Catholic school system but rather a chance to reinvigorate Catholic education in the United States," said Casey Carter, CEO of Faith in the Future. "The first-of-its-kind model is what drew me to the position. Since the year 2000, nearly 2,000 Catholic schools have closed all across the country and it is time for that trend to stop. I have worked in - and studied the best practices of some of the very best schools in the world - and now it is time, beginning here in the city of Philadelphia, to bring those practices to the service of Catholic schools. I have chosen to come to the Foundation, and to this great Catholic school system in particular, because of the bold thinking and action that established it. I am confident that this can be the vanguard for what other dioceses can do to grow Catholic schools again and ensure that they remain a critical educational option within our communities."

Mr. Carter's appointment is effective immediately and he has re-located to Philadelphia from Washington, D.C. He has three daughters, Kirby (13), Casey (11), and Lucy (9). He will begin immediate and intensive meetings with the Office for Catholic Education and the presidents and principals of the Foundation's 21 schools. Mr. Carter will also visit each of the 17 high schools and four schools of special education before the end of November.

"Having Casey at the helm of this Foundation is a win for Catholic education in the Philadelphia region - and nationally," said Hanway. "I can say without reservation that Casey has a distinct vision for our future, the experience to successfully implement that vision, and, as you will soon see, the tireless energy we need to build upon our strong momentum. Casey Carter is exactly the right person to lead us into this new chapter for Catholic education."

For more information about Mr. Carter and his appointment as CEO of the Faith in the Future Foundation, visit www.faithinthefuture.com. To register a student at any of the Foundation's 17 Catholic high schools, please visit www.AOPRegister.com.

###


Contact
Michelle Hunt
Account Supervisor
484-385-2922

Archdiocese Of PhiladelphiaTo Induct Five Honorees Into Hall Of Fame

October 10, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA
TO INDUCT FIVE HONOREES
INTO HALL OF FAME


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia will honor five remarkable Catholic school graduates with its 2012 Distinguished Graduate Award, also known as the Archdiocesan Hall of Fame. The event honors Catholic school alumni who have not only achieved professional success in their chosen fields, but also demonstrate a commitment to living their lives by the Gospel Values that guide and define Catholic education in the Archdiocese.

The Emcee for the evening is Mr. Bob Kelly, CBS 3 Traffic Reporter and Graduate of North Catholic High School. Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will offer remarks as well as the final prayer. Mayor Michael Nutter is also scheduled to attend and congratulate the honorees.

Guests will be entertained by the 20 members of the All Catholic Jazz Band under the direction of Mr. Matthew Schwartz. Rachel Campana, a student at Archbishop Wood High School in Bucks County will sing the National Anthem and Collin McDonald a student at Bishop Shanahan High School in Chester County will perform on the piano.

7:00 p.m.
Thursday, October 11, 2012
The Crystal Tea Room - Wanamaker Building (9th floor)
Broad and Juniper Streets
Philadelphia, PA 19107


The five honorees to be inducted into the Archdiocesan Hall of Fame are:


Mr. Tim Chambers - Director/Screenwriter/Producer, The Mighty Macs, CEO, Tango Traffic and Partner, Quaker Media
Saint Anastasia School in Newtown Square (Delaware County) and Cardinal O'Hara High School in Springfield (Delaware County)

Growing up as one of twelve children, all of whom attended Catholic Schools, Tim Chambers found the faith-filled teachings he learned in the classroom always reinforced at home. With the foundation set in his elementary years at Saint Anastasia's in Newtown Square and secondary school at Cardinal O'Hara, Tim looks to his Catholic education as setting the stage for his career in media.

Today, Tim is an experienced entertainment executive who has spent over 20 years in the film, television, and technology industries-and has made it a mission to incorporate the Catholic faith into his work in a favorable light. Most notably he wrote, produced, and directed The Mighty Macs. Along with many other accolades and successes, he is also the Founder and CEO of both the Quaker Media Group and Tango Traffic, both located in Malvern, PA and Los Angeles, CA. Tim lives with his wife, Kathleen, and their three sons in Media, PA.

Mr. Gerard P. Cuddy - President and Chief Executive Officer, Beneficial Bank
Saint Andrew Elementary School in Drexel Hill (Delaware County) and Monsignor Bonner High School in Drexel Hill (Delaware County)

Since the very first year he attended Saint Andrew Elementary School in Drexel Hill, Gerard Cuddy's perspective on life had begun to take shape. He comes from a long line of Catholic school graduates, the value system and gospel teachings learned in the classroom were always reinforced at home.

The desire to pursue a faith-filled education led Gerard to go on to attend Monsignor Bonner High School, earn an undergraduate degree at Villanova University, and complete a Master's degree at Saint Joseph's University.

As the President and CEO of Beneficial Bank, Gerard finds himself taking an extra five minutes for prayer or reflection before making large business decisions-an exercise learned early in his educational years.

A member of Our Mother of Good Counsel parish, Gerard currently resides in Rosemont, PA, with his wife and children.

Mr. James Hirschmann, Jr., - Chief Executive Officer, Western Asset Management Company
Nativity of Our Lord School in Warminster (Bucks County) and Archbishop Wood High School Warminster (Bucks County)

At a very young age, Jim Hirschmann learned that Catholic faith and Catholic education went hand-in-hand and that everyone from parents and teachers to priests, sisters, and coaches played an integral part in fostering faith-filled students.

An active member of his parish's CYO program, Jim loved playing basketball, baseball, track and any other sport he could get involved in. He also spent his time serving as an altar boy and singing in the choir.

It's no wonder that now, as President and CEO of Western Asset Management Company -one of the world's largest investment managers - Jim still lives his life with excellence grounded in faith. For you see, what sets Western Asset apart from its competitors are several tenants of Jim's Catholic upbringing: a nurturing environment, mutual respect and responsibility, discipline, and high expectations both in and out of the office.

Jim currently resides in Pasadena, CA, with his wife, Laura, and their two children.

Ms. Jane Metzler - Anchor/Reporter, Fox News Radio
Queen of Peace School in Ardsley (Mongtomery County) and Bishop McDevitt High School in Wyncote (Montgomery County)

Jane Metzler grew up in Ardsley, Pennsylvania. Her Catholic education journey began at Queen of Peace elementary school, where she had her first encounter with public speaking after being called on by the Archbishop at confirmation.

Jane went on to attend Bishop McDevitt High School, where she was a proud member of the school's speech and debate teams and served as Class Chairman for three years. The confidence and knowledge she gained from her experiences in high school eventually lead to a successful career in broadcast journalism.

As an anchor for Fox News Radio, Jane looks back at her time at McDevitt with fond memories and sincere gratitude.

Jane currently resides in Hawthorne, New Jersey, is an active member of Saint Anthony's parish and an enthusiastic advocate of Catholic education.

Brother Richard Kestler, FSC, - President of West Philadelphia Catholic High School
Saint Martin of Tours School (Philadelphia) and La Salle College High School in Wyndmoor (Montgomery County)

Since his days attending Saint Martin of Tours parish school in the Oxford Circle section of Philadelphia, Brother Richard Kestler has always had a passion for education.

Even after graduating from high school, completing his undergraduate studies, and earning two master's degrees, Brother Richard still spends every day in school. As President of West Philadelphia Catholic High School, he continues to share his passion for faith and learning with future generations of students.

Brother Richard always had an interest in teaching young students, but it wasn't until he was strongly influenced by a handful of Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary and Brothers of the Christian Schools that he decided to become a member of the Christian Brothers himself, - something he has enjoyed for every minute of the past 52 years.

These five individuals exemplify the Promise Fulfilled by Catholic Education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

###


Editor's Note:For more information about schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia please visit
www.catholicschools-phl.org.




Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: The Year Of Faith And How We're Called To Live It

October 11, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
THE YEAR OF FAITH AND HOW WE'RE CALLED TO LIVE IT


In leading us into the Year of Faith, which began October 11, Pope Benedict calls on each of us as believers to "rediscover [God's] joy," to "radiate [God's] word," and to make our Christian witness "frank and contagious."

Now those are wonderful words, but how do we actually live them? We need to begin by realizing that we're not being asked to do the impossible - only the uncomfortable and inconvenient.

Benedict is asking us to examine our hearts and our habits of life without excuses or alibis. He's asking us to tear down the cathedral we build to ourselves, the whole interior architecture of our vanities, our resentments and our endless appetites, and to channel all the restless fears and longings of modern life into a hunger for the Holy Spirit. If you think that sounds easy or pious, try it this week.

In every generation, Christians yearn to get back to the "purity of the early Church," and of course that seems like an admirable goal. But the Church has never been pristine. She's never been without scandals and sinners, apostates and critics and persecutors. St. Paul was run out of town more than once; he was rejected by his brothers more than once; and when he writes his Epistle to the Ephesians, he's writing from a jail cell.

In reality, sin is part of the human terrain and a daily challenge to our discipleship. And if our hearts are cold, if our minds are closed, if our spirits are fat and acquisitive, curled up on a pile of our possessions, then the Church in this country will wither. It's happened before in other times and places, and it can happen here. We can't change the world by ourselves. And we can't reinvent the Church. But we can help God change us. We can live our faith with zeal and conviction - and then God will take care of the rest.

Benedict has some concrete suggestions for the Year of Faith that deserve our close attention. Three of them stand out:

First, the Holy Father urges parishes and other church groups to study the Creed and the Catechism. The Creed is the definition of who we are. It's a fundamental declaration of Catholic faith, identity and belonging.

Second, the Pope asks us "to intensify [our] witness of charity." The Pope stresses that faith and charity depend on one another. Faith without charity "bears no fruit."

Third and finally, Benedict urges us study the history of our faith and see the way in which "holiness and sin" are so often woven together.

Henri de Lubac, the great Jesuit theologian, once said that when the world insinuates itself into the heart of the Church, the Church becomes worse than the world -- not just a caricature of the world, but the world in greater mediocrity and even greater ugliness.

Real faith - the kind our Holy Father calls us to -- demands a keen awareness of our failures as Christians and a spirit of repentance. It requires us to seek out who Jesus Christ really is, and what he asks from each of us as disciples. And that always involves the cross.

Does that sound anything like the actual tone of Catholic life in our country today? Too often, probably not. Yet that's the life of honesty, holiness, heroism and sacrifice that God asks from all of us as a Church and each of us as individual believers in the Year of Faith.

Human beings make history, not the other way around. God made us to be happy with him; to be loved by him; and to bring others to know his love. That's the glory of being alive. That's the grandeur of being a disciple of Jesus Christ.

The task of preaching and teaching, growing and living the Catholic faith in our time, in this country, belongs to you and me. No one else can do it. The future depends on God, but he builds it with the living stones we give him by the example of our lives.

###


Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Announces Resolution In Case Of Priest On Administrative Leave

October 15, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA ANNOUNCES
RESOLUTION IN CASE OF PRIEST ON ADMINISTRATIVE LEAVE


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced today that Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., has made a final decision in one of the cases of priests placed on administrative leave following the February 2011 Grand Jury Report.

Archbishop Chaput has decided that Father Joseph DiGregorio is suitable for ministry based on reports of the Multi-Disciplinary Team (MDT) led by veteran child abuse prosecutor Gina Maisto Smith and a further examination by the Archdiocesan Review Board which had similar findings. A rigorous investigative process involving more than 20 experts in child abuse did find that Father DiGregorio violated The Standards of Ministerial Behaviors and Boundaries more than 40 years ago but that there is compelling evidence that makes him suitable for ministry.

The MDT reports stated that that there have been no complaints about Father DiGregorio in more than forty years, there is no evidence that he poses a danger to children, and there is no indication he had or would engage in a pattern of behavior that would necessitate his removal from ministry. Based upon recommendations of the MDT and the Review Board, Archbishop Chaput made the final decision.

Announcements were made this weekend at Stella Maris Parish and St. Martin of Tours Parish, both in Philadelphia. Counselors were present. Unlike the resolution of other cases which have already been announced, greater detail was provided in this case due to its already public nature. In order to protect the individuals involved in this matter though, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia is unable to provide further information about this case.

Father DiGregorio's case followed the same procedure as all other cases of priests placed on administrative leave following the February 2011 Grand Jury Report. Prior to an investigation conducted by the Multi-Disciplinary Team, the case was submitted to the appropriate local district attorney's office. After being released by the district attorney, an investigation was conducted by the MDT. The results of the investigations were provided to the Archdiocesan Review Board (ARB). The Review Board is a consultative panel that advises the Archbishop throughout the process of addressing allegations of sexual abuse of minors and violations of The Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries, evaluating clerics' suitability for ministry, and the continual review of Archdiocesan policies and procedures related to these matters.

Archbishop Chaput said, "In making this decision I relied on the counsel of the Archdiocesan Review Board and the Multi-Disciplinary Team. The experience of these experts who have devoted their lives to addressing the societal evil of sexual abuse is critical to the work we do. All cases are unique and contain various factors that require careful consideration. This one was no exception.

Based on the facts of Father DiGregorio's case, a thorough external investigation, the fact that no other complaints were reported in an atmosphere where the public was largely aware of the situation, and that thorough clinical evaluations from competent outside authorities indicate he poses no danger to minors, I found him suitable for ministry."


On May 4, 2012, and July 6, 2012 Archbishop Chaput announced resolutions in 14 of the cases of priests on administrative leave. Of the 14, seven priests were found suitable for ministry and seven priests were found unsuitable for ministry. In one additional case, the priest died before a full investigation could be conducted so it was not possible to reach a conclusion. All of those cases followed the same process of review; release by the district attorney, investigation by the MDT, review by the ARB and final decision by the Archbishop. More information regarding those announcements is available at http://archphila.org/HHHIC/hhhic.htm.

With the decision announced today, the Archdiocese will continue the initiative entitled Honesty, Healing and Hope in Christ: Confronting Sexual Violence in Our Archdiocese, which was introduced in May 2012. Once a case is resolved the initiative begins at the parish level and consists of four phases over six months. Its purpose is to address the wide variety of reactions, thoughts and feelings that will be experienced as a result of this announcement and in the days and weeks moving forward. It identifies three primary stakeholders: the victims of the allegation or violation of The Standards of Ministerial Behaviors and Boundaries, the parishioners, who include school and Parish Religious Education Program (PREP) families, and the priests on administrative leave. Through the implementation of this initiative, the Archdiocese continues a journey of honesty, healing and hope toward the restoration of trust.

The remaining 9 administrative leave cases are not being announced today for a variety of reasons. The Archdiocese referred all of its cases to the local district attorney. Three cases have not yet been released by law enforcement so the internal Archdiocesan investigation led by the Multi-Disciplinary Team (MDT) cannot begin yet. Four cases were released by law enforcement over the past several months and are currently under investigation by the MDT. In one case there was an arrest. In other cases, the Archdiocese has received release from the district attorney, the internal investigation is complete, and the matter is awaiting examination by the Archdiocesan Review Board or a final decision by Archbishop Chaput.

Due to the ongoing process there is no indication as to when the resolutions of the remaining cases will be made, however the Archdiocese is anxious to announce them as soon as possible.

As part of its efforts to bring this process to a conclusion, the multidisciplinary team has located, gathered and reviewed more than 400,000 pages of relevant documents, identified, located and interviewed 244 witnesses, across the United States and in several foreign countries, and conducted countless site visits to parishes and schools where incidents were alleged to have occurred. Many cases involved a search for additional evidence including yearbooks, parish records, photographs and public documents. Some cases dated as far back in time as 40 years, which posed significant investigative challenges.

Biographical Information on Reverend Joseph L. DiGregorio
Father DiGregorio is 72 years old. He was ordained in 1966. He served at the following parishes and schools: Our Lady of Loreto, Philadelphia (1966-1970); King of Peace, Philadelphia (1970); Bishop McDevitt High School, Wyncote (1970-1971); Saint Anthony of Padua, Ambler (1970-1971); Saint Thomas Aquinas, Philadelphia (1971-1976); Saint Mary Magdalen de Pazzi, Philadelphia (1976-1977); Annunciation, B.V.M., Philadelphia (1977-1982); Saint Paul, Philadelphia, (1982-1987); Saint Maria Goretti High School, Philadelphia (1983-1988); Epiphany of Our Lord, Philadelphia (1987-1988); Military Chaplain, United States Army (1988-2005); Saint Martin of Tours, Philadelphia (2005-2010); Stella Maris, Philadelphia (2010-2011); placed on administrative leave (2011).

To Make a Report
If you would like to report a violation of The Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries, contact the Archdiocesan Office for Investigations at 1-800-932-0313.

If you would like to report an allegation of sexual abuse, contact your local law enforcement agency and/or the Office for Investigations at 1-800-932-0313.

We recognize that this public notice may be painful to victims of sexual violence. If you need support or assistance, victim services are available to you through the Victim Assistance Office of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia at 1-888-800-8780 or philavac@adphila.org.

###


Editor's Note:
Cases of administrative leave following the Grand Jury Report: 26
Resolutions announced on May 4th: 8 (one priest died prior to a full investigation) total of 9
Resolutions announced on July 6th: 6
Priests on Administrative Leave who Were Arrested: 1
Resolutions announced today: 1
Cases remaining: 9

For additional background information please visit http://archphila.org/HHHIC/hhhic.php.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Premiere Of Sign Language Formation Video Series Strengthen In The Faith: Confirmation Program Aims To Assist Members Of The Deaf Community In Their Faith Preparation

October 16, 2012

PREMIERE OF SIGN LANGUAGE FORMATION VIDEO SERIES

Strengthen in the Faith: Confirmation program aims to assist members of the deaf community
in their faith preparation


Members of the Deaf Apostolate have a new tool for religious formation. The National Catholic Office for the Deaf (NCOD) has produced a video series titled Strengthen in the Faith: Confirmation. Teenagers and adults who are deaf or hard of hearing and are preparing to receive the Sacrament of Confirmation can now study through video lessons in sign language. The series will also assist those wishing to learn the signs for religious vocabulary.

The series premieres on:

Sunday, October 21, 2012
3:30 p.m.
Saint Joseph's University - Doyle Banquet Hall
City Avenue and Cardinal Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 18131


Strengthen in the Faith: Confirmation is a video series that presents religious concepts through lessons in American Sign Language, vignettes on the life of the Saints, and scripture. Each lesson also includes vocabulary in American Sign Language.

Archbishop Chaput is featured in one of the lessons. Many prominent deaf actors and actresses appear in the series as well as local actors and actresses from Philadelphia.

# # #


Editor's Note: For more information, please contact Sister Kathleen Schipani at 215-587-3913 or email srschipa@adphila.org.

For more information on the National Catholic Office for the Deaf visit www.ncod.org.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Nutritional Development Services Is Cooking Up A Celebration For School Lunch Week Special Event At Saint Cecilia School Aims To Get Kids Excited About Eating Healthy

October 16, 2012

NUTRITIONAL DEVELOPMENT SERVICES IS COOKING UP
A CELEBRATION FOR SCHOOL LUNCH WEEK

Special event at Saint Cecilia School aims to get kids excited about eating healthy


Nutritional Development Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will celebrate National School Lunch Week with a special day at one of its newest school partner sites, Saint Cecilia in the city's Fox Chase section.

On Thursday, October 18th, students will receive nutrition puzzles, coloring sheets and stickers to remind them of the importance of eating healthy at school and at home. A proclamation celebrating National School Lunch Week will also be read at lunchtime in the school cafeteria.

Thursday, October 18
12:00 p.m.
Saint Cecilia Parish School
525 Rhawn Street
Philadelphia, PA 19111


Saint Cecilia's joins 110 other Catholic elementary, charter and private schools in the five-county-area making healthy meals available to its students under the sponsorship of Nutritional Development Services.

Serving more than 31 million children every school day, the federally-funded National School Lunch Program provides nutritionally balanced, healthy meals to students. The program, which has been serving the nation's children for over 60 years, requires school meals to meet the USDA's new nutrition standards by:

* Ensuring students are offered both fruits and vegetables every day of the week.
* Substantially increasing offerings of whole grain-rich foods.
* Offering only fat-free or low-fat milk varieties.
* Limiting calories based on the age of children being served to ensure proper portion size.
* Increasing the focus on reducing the amounts of saturated fat, trans fats and sodium.

###


Editor's Note: For more information, please contact Anne H. Ayella at 267-262-8901.
For more information about Nutritional Development Services please visit http://www.ndsarch.org.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Announces New Review Board Chair, Vice Chair, And Members Former Philadelphia Prosecutor Robert Spinelli To Serve As Chair; Former Philadelphia First Assistant District Attorney Arnold Gordon To Serve As Vice Chair; Reverend Stephen Leva And Christine Campbell To Serve As Review Board Members

October 17, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA ANNOUNCES NEW REVIEW BOARD CHAIR, VICE CHAIR, AND MEMBERS
Former Philadelphia prosecutor Robert Spinelli to serve as chair;
former Philadelphia First Assistant District Attorney Arnold Gordon to serve as vice chair;
Reverend Stephen Leva and Christine Campbell to serve as Review Board members


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced today that Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has appointed former Philadelphia prosecutor Robert Spinelli as the new chair and former Philadelphia First Assistant District Attorney Arnold Gordon as the new vice chair of the Archdiocesan Review Board. Both Mr. Spinelli and Mr. Gordon have served on the Review Board since June of 2011.

Dr. Ana Maria Catanzaro and Rev. Msgr. Thomas Owens recently completed their terms of service on the Review Board. Archbishop Chaput has appointed Christine Campbell, RN, the Trauma Program Manager at Saint Christopher's Hospital for Children, and Rev. Stephen Leva, Pastor of Saint Timothy Parish in Philadelphia to fill the seats they vacated.

In making these announcements, Archbishop Chaput said, "The work of the Archdiocesan Review Board is critical to our efforts to protect children and young people. Our Archdiocese is privileged to benefit from the talent of its members, each of whom serves with dedication and passion. I'm grateful to Dr. Ana Maria Catanzaro and Msgr. Thomas Owens for their extraordinary service during a very difficult time in the life of our local Church."

He continued, "I'm confident that Mr. Spinelli and Mr. Gordon have the right mix of leadership skills, professional background, and energy to serve as chair and vice chair. Lastly, I'm pleased that Father Steve Leva and Christine Campbell have agreed to serve on the Review Board. It's a position that will demand much of their time and talent and I know they have the expertise necessary to make positive, impactful contributions to the Board's work."

The Archdiocesan Review Board was established in accord with the Charter for the Protection of Children and Young People and the Essential Norms, and is comprised of psychologists, social workers, educators, retired law enforcement agents, health care professionals, parents and one pastor. This group functions as a confidential, advisory committee to the Archbishop. It assesses allegations of sexual abuse as well as allegations of violations of The Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries and makes recommendations regarding suitability for ministry. It also assists in the continual review of Archdiocesan policies and procedures related to these matters.

Through careful analysis of each case, the Board assists the Archbishop in ensuring that no priest with a substantiated allegation of sexual abuse of a minor will serve in active ministry. The Board also ensures that all allegations of sexual abuse of minors are first reported to law enforcement.

The Archdiocesan Review Board now consists of twelve total members, each of whom is appointed to serve a four-year or five-year term, which is renewable. Biographical information for all members can be found below.

ARCHDIOCESAN REVIEW BOARD MEMBERS
as of October 2012


Michael Boyle
Michael Boyle currently serves as the first Program Director at the Philadelphia Sexual Assault Response Center, which was established to provide assistance to sexual assault victims in need of independent, victim-centered evidence recovery efforts. A 30-year veteran of the Philadelphia Police Department, Boyle attained the rank of Lieutenant and served for fourteen years as the Commanding Officer in the Child Abuse Unit, where he was responsible for administrative oversight of a collaborative investigative process that included child welfare authorities, medical professionals and forensic interviewers working on approximately 1,700 reported cases of child abuse or neglect each year.

Christine Campbell
Christine Campbell is the Trauma Program manager at the St. Christopher's Hospital for Children, the SANE Coordinator at Crozer-Chester Medical Center as well as the SANE nurse for the Philadelphia Sexual Assault Response Center. She obtained her Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner Training (SANE) in September 2002. She holds a bachelor's degree in nursing, a masters degree in Forensic Medicine, and certifications as a SANE-A and SANE-P. She was formerly the Director of the Clinical Forensic Examiner Program at Abington Memorial Hospital. She has trained nurses throughout the Montgomery, Bucks, Delaware, Philadelphia and Berks County and has participated in the Philadelphia Sexual Assault Advisory Committee, Montgomery County Sexual Task Force and the Montgomery County Human Trafficking Task Force. Ms. Campbell provides lectures and on-going training to various medical providers in the areas of adult and child sexual assault.

Stacey Ginesin
Stacey Ginesin is a clinical psychologist with nearly 15 years of experience working with sexual offenders in Atlanta, San Francisco and Philadelphia in research, outpatient, and prison settings. She was instrumental in the development of the TAP program, an outpatient sex offender treatment program in Philadelphia and served as the program director until 2010. In that capacity Dr. Ginesin provided treatment, conducted evaluations and risk assessments, and supervised other clinicians. She has worked closely with the court systems in Philadelphia and the surrounding counties. In addition to her work with offenders, Dr. Ginesin has worked with sexual abuse victims and their families. She has been a member of the Pennsylvania Sexual Offender Assessment Board since 2008 and is the Eastern Pennsylvania area representative for the Mid-Atlantic chapter of the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers.

Arnold Gordon
A prosecutor with 40 years of experience in the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office and the U.S. Department of Justice, Arnold Gordon most recently served as First Assistant District Attorney in Philadelphia. He previously served as Chief of the D.A.'s Homicide, Felony Waiver, and Municipal Court Units. As a Special Attorney in the Justice Department's Organized Crime section, Gordon played a major role in the investigation and subsequent conviction in one of the most significant racketeering cases in U.S. history.

Bebe Kivitz
Bebe Kivitz is a former prosecutor and former Chief of the Child Abuse Unit in the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office. Ms. Kivitz also has extensive experience in private practice where she has handled a broad range of litigation matters including civil rights, medical malpractice, toxic tort, corporate investigations, internal disciplinary proceedings, personal injury, employment, and commercial disputes. She specializes in abuse litigation and continues to represent assault victims. Ms. Kivitz has served on the Board of Directors of Philadelphia Children's Alliance since 2000, a non-profit organization which collaborates with law enforcement, child welfare, and medical professionals, and conducts state of the art forensic interviews of child abuse victims. She is also a member of Brandeis Law Society, and has served on its Executive Committee since 2010.

Janet Shaw Lemoine
A member of the Pennsylvania Bar, Janet Shaw Lemoine is a former victim advocate and trainer with 16 years of experience in Philadelphia and across the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Most recently, she served as the Director of the Victim/Witness Training and Networking Project funded through the Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency and administered by the Pennsylvania District Attorneys Association. Her responsibilities included training, trouble-shooting and networking statewide with both system-based victim/witness coordinators as well as community based agencies. She previously served as Director of Northwest Victim Services, the first community based comprehensive victim service agency in Philadelphia. Prior to her work with victims, Ms. Lemoine served as a Secondary School teacher with the Philadelphia School District. She has a Master's Degree from Villanova University and a law degree from the Delaware Law School of Widener University.

Reverend Stephen Leva
Father Stephen Leva serves as Pastor of Saint Timothy Church in the Mayfair section of Philadelphia. Father is a native Philadelphian, growing up in Olney and attending Saint Helena Elementary School and Cardinal Dougherty High School. He attended Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary in Philadelphia, Saint Pius X Seminary in Erlanger, Kentucky and Mount Saint Mary's College and Seminary in Emmitsburg, Maryland. He was Ordained in 1988 in Arlington, Virginia for the Diocese of Arlington and served as a priest in that Diocese for 17 years. Father returned home to Philadelphia and was incardinated into the Archdiocese in 2008. His first assignment in the Archdiocese was as Parochial Vicar at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in Doylestown.

Richmond Parsons
A nationally recognized trainer with more than twenty years of experience in law enforcement, probation and parole, Richmond Parsons currently serves as Deputy Chief of Offender Services in the Montgomery County Adult Probation and Parole Department. He has conducted trainings for local, state and national probation and parole agencies on topics such as computer search and seizure, sex offender management and leadership. He currently serves as the Chairman of the Montgomery County Sex Offender Task Force and works with the Montgomery County Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force. He is also a member of the Governor's Advisory Committee on Probation and Secretary of the Mid-Atlantic chapter of the Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers.

Laura Rogers
Laura Rogers served as the Director of the Center for Litigation Training and Community Practice Management and the Deputy Director of the Criminal Law Division of the Navy's Office of the Judge Advocate General, where she served as the Navy's expert on military justice issues. She also acted as legal advisor on the operations of the Sexual Assault Prevention Training Program. In 2006, she was appointed by President George W. Bush as the Founding Director of the Department of Justice's Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering and Tracking (SMART) office, where she was responsible for the implementation of the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006, the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act. Prior to her work with the federal government, Rogers founded and served as Director of the National Institute for Training Child Abuse Professionals, where she trained prosecutors, medical and law enforcement professionals, forensic interviewers, therapists and protective service workers on a range of topics related to child sexual and physical abuse. She is a former prosecutor from San Diego County where she specialized in child homicide and child sexual molestation prosecutions.

Robert L. Sadoff
Dr. Robert Sadoff is currently Clinical Professor of Forensic Psychiatry and Director of the Forensic Psychiatry Fellowship Program at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, where he has taught since 1972. He is the author of over 100 articles and 10 books on issues in forensic psychiatry. He has examined over 10,000 individuals charged with crimes during the past 50 years and has testified for both prosecution and defense in over 20 states and several federal jurisdictions. He is the recipient of numerous national and international awards and has lectured in almost every state and in 12 countries of the world.

Anne Shenberger
Anne Shenberger is Executive Director of Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA)/Youth Advocates Inc. She served for over twenty years as the Southeast Regional Director of Pennsylvania's Office of Children, Youth and Families. In that role, she was responsible for the investigation of allegations of child abuse in foster and adoptive homes, group homes, residential facilities and day care centers. She has a Master's Degree in social work from Bryn Mawr College and is a licensed social worker in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. In addition to the Archdiocese Review Board, she serves on the Board of Directors of several other nonprofit agencies in the Philadelphia area.

Robert Spinelli
A former prosecutor with the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office, Mr. Spinelli is now a partner at the law firm Kelley Jasons McGowan Spinelli Hanna & Reber. Mr. Spinelli specializes in representing companies involved in mass tort litigation. He has extensive experience in overall claims management for companies involved in hundreds of thousands of claims nationwide. In addition to organizing and participating in numerous legal seminars on mass tort litigation all across the country, Mr. Spinelli has lectured on medico-legal issues at the Thomas Jefferson University School of Medicine and Temple University.

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Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Public Witness And Catholic Citizenship

October 18, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
PUBLIC WITNESS AND CATHOLIC CITIZENSHIP


Public witness on issues of public concern is natural for Catholics because we have a commitment to the common good and to the dignity of each human person. Those two pillars - the common good and the dignity of every human person - come right out of Scripture. They underpin all of Catholic social thought. That includes politics. Politics is where the competing moral visions of a society meet and struggle. And since a large majority of American citizens are religious believers, it makes sense for people and communities of faith to bring their faith into the public square.

As a result, if we believe that a particular issue is gravely evil and damaging to society, then we have a duty, not just a religious duty but also a democratic duty, to hold accountable the candidates who want to allow that evil. Failing to do so is an abuse of responsibility on our part, because that's where we exercise our power as citizens most directly - in the voting booth.

The "separation of Church and state" can never mean that religious believers should be silent about legislative issues, the appointment of judges or public policy. It's not the job of the Church to sponsor political candidates. But it's very much the job of the Church to guide Catholics to think and act in accord with their faith.

So since this is an election year, here are a few simple points to remember as we move toward November.

1. "Catholic" is a word that has real meaning. We don't control or invent that meaning as individuals. We inherit it from the Gospel and the experience of the Church over the centuries. If we choose to call ourselves Catholic, then that word has consequences for what we believe and how we act. We can't truthfully call ourselves "Catholic" and then behave as if we're not.

2. Being a Catholic is a bit like being married. We have a relationship with the Church and with Jesus Christ that's similar to being a spouse. If a man says he loves his wife, his wife will want to see the evidence in his fidelity. The same applies to our relationship with God. If we say we're Catholic, we need to show that by our love for the Church and our fidelity to what she teaches and believes. Otherwise we're just fooling ourselves. God certainly won't be fooled.

3. The Church is not a political organism. She has no interest in partisanship because getting power or running governments is not what she's about, and the more closely she identifies herself with any single party, the fewer people she can effectively reach.

4. Scripture and Catholic teaching, however, do have public consequences because they guide us in how we should act in relation to one another. Again, Catholic social action, including political action, is a natural byproduct of the Church's moral message. We can't call ourselves Catholic, and then simply stand by while immigrants get mistreated, or the poor get robbed, or - even more fundamentally -- unborn children get killed. If our faith is real, then it will bear fruit in our public decisions and behaviors, including our political choices.

5. Each of us needs to follow his or her own conscience. But conscience doesn't emerge miraculously from a vacuum. The way we get a healthy conscience is by submitting it to God's will; and the way we find God's will is by listening to the counsel of the Church and trying honestly to live in accord with her guidance. If we find ourselves frequently disagreeing, as Catholics, with the teaching of our own Church on serious matters, then it's probably not the Church that's wrong. The problem is much more likely with us.

In the end, the heart of truly faithful citizenship is this: We're better citizens when we're more faithful Catholics. The more authentically Catholic we are in our lives, choices, actions and convictions, the more truly we will contribute to the moral and political life of our nation.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Preside At Dedication Of Blessed Teresa Of Calcutta Parish Church The New Church's Unique Design Features Historical Artwork And Sacred Objects From Suppressed Churches Throughout The Archdiocese And Beyond

October 22, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO PRESIDE AT DEDICATION OF
BLESSED TERESA OF CALCUTTA PARISH CHURCH

The new church's unique design features historical artwork and sacred objects from suppressed churches throughout the Archdiocese and beyond


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will preside over the Rite of Dedication for the new Blessed Teresa of Calcutta Parish Church in Schwenksville (Montgomery County).

Saturday, October 27, 2012
Vigil Mass with Rite of Dedication
4:00 p.m.
256 Swamp Pike
Schwenksville, PA 19473


The church is unlike any other in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. Architectural elements as well as religious artwork and sacred objects from five suppressed Catholic churches and one closed Catholic hospital were utilized to create the new structure, which is a faithful representation of a 19th century Gothic style church both internally and externally.

A sampling of the major components includes:

-exterior framework, 37' high marble altar, 25' high mahogany pipe organ, altar rail, confessionals, and baptismal font from Saint Boniface Church (closed in 2006 and formerly located at 2nd and Diamond Streets, Philadelphia);
-19th century stained glass windows from Saint Clement Church (closed in 2004 and formerly located at 2220 South 71st Street, Philadelphia);
-murals and marble holy water fonts from Saint Peter Church (closed in 2006 and formerly located at 1126 South Street, Pottstown);
-the gothic pulpit from Saint Clare Church (closed in 2006 and formerly located at 1228 Main Street in Linfield);
-marble reredos, an altar and pulpit from Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish (closed in and formerly located in Middleport);
-and Deprado Stations of the Cross which surround the church from Mercy Hospital (closed in 2011 and formerly located in Scranton).

By incorporating major design elements from closed churches into a new, strong and vibrant community of faith, this unique church building is highly symbolic of the evolving face of Catholicism. Of particular note are the items from Saint Clare and Saint Peter churches, which closed in 2006 and merged to form the current Blessed Teresa of Calcutta Parish.

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Editor's Note: For more information please contact Father Paul Brandt, Pastor of Blessed Teresa of Calcutta Parish, at 215-651-4454.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Update From The Office Of Catholic Education Regarding Plan For Lansdale Catholic High School Building Project

October 23, 2012

UPDATE FROM THE OFFICE OF CATHOLIC EDUCATION REGARDING PLAN FOR
LANSDALE CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING PROJECT


After careful consideration, the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and the Office of Catholic Education have decided not to move forward with a building project in Hilltown Township, Bucks County, on property which was intended for a new Lansdale Catholic Regional High School.

The site comprises 68 acres at the intersection of Limekiln Pike and Rickert Road. 64 acres were purchased by Archdiocese of Philadelphia in October 2001. Two smaller adjacent land parcels totaling four acres were purchased in March and June of 2008. The plan for the new high school had been originally announced in January 2007. Since the land will not be used it is likely this property will be marketed for sale.

"The financial challenges facing the Archdiocese have been clearly communicated in recent months. As part of an effort to improve our financial situation several real estate holdings have recently been sold or marketed for sale," said Bishop Michael J. Fitzgerald, Auxiliary Bishop of Philadelphia, who oversees the Office of Catholic Education. "Although the new high school will not be built, we are confident that Lansdale Catholic is well poised to continue providing a high quality Catholic education far into the future at its current location."

Over the past several years, under the guidance of the current school administration several improvements have been made to the existing school: upgraded technology infrastructure to provide wireless access throughout the school; renovated Resource Center for iPad, iPhone and Netbook use; a refurbished floor and new bleachers in the gymnasium; sound and stage lighting upgrades in the auditorium; new student lockers on two floors of the original building; refurbished weight and athletic locker rooms; a repaved main parking lot and a new LED outdoor sign. These enhancements were funded by the Office of Catholic Education and the Lansdale Catholic High School alumni, parents, and benefactors.

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Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Catholic Charities Appeal Wins Diocesan Stewardship Award

October 25, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA
CATHOLIC CHARITIES APPEAL WINS
DIOCESAN STEWARDSHIP AWARD


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia Office for Stewardship and Development has been awarded 1st Place by the International Catholic Stewardship Council (ICSC) Diocese Stewardship Awards, in the Annual Brochure category, for its Because I am Catholic brochure. The award was presented at the ICSC Annual Conference in Chicago on September 18, 2012. "This recognition highlighted the creative and professional marketing materials for the Archdiocese's Catholic Charities Appeal this year," said Monsignor Beach, Archbishop's Delegate for the Office for Stewardship and Development.

The International Catholic Stewardship Council is an organization dedicated to advancing Christian stewardship, Catholic philanthropy and resource development in North America as well as overseas. Each year ICSC recognizes the archdiocese or diocese that best promotes through its publications and other materials the theology of stewardship.

The Catholic Charities Appeal funds the Catholic Social Services programs of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, including senior centers, educational programs for disabled children, hospices and soup kitchens. The Appeal provides hope and gives help to over 250,000 people each year. One hundred percent of the money raised during the Appeal directly benefits those in need in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. To date, more than $9 million has been received towards this year's $10 million dollar goal. Despite the difficult economic times, the appeal has seen 18,000 new donors who had not previously donated to the appeal. The donor base has increased from 37,000 donors last year to over 55,000 donors this year. The Archdiocese of Philadelphia Catholic Charities Appeal ends December 31, 2012.

Founded in 1958 by John Cardinal O'Hara, the Catholic Charities Appeal funds over 80 agencies throughout the five counties of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. The services that the Archdiocese provides reflect a belief in the sanctity of human life, the dignity of the individual, and the central role of the family in life and society.

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Editor's Note: For more information on the Catholic Charities Appeal visit www.catholiccharitiesappeal.org or call the Office for Stewardship and Development at
(215) 587-5650.

To view the Catholic Charities Appeal Because I am Catholic brochure visit www.catholiccharitiesappeal.org/publications/.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput To Celebrate 7th Annual Hispanic Heritage Mass

October 26, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT TO CELEBRATE
7th ANNUAL HISPANIC HERITAGE MASS


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., Archbishop of Philadelphia, celebrates the annual Hispanic Heritage Mass with the Hispanic community. He will be joined by Bishop Nelson J. Perez, Auxiliary Bishop of Rockville Centre, New York, this year's homilist. Hispanic Catholics gather at the Cathedral to celebrate their heritage and rich diversity along with the many priests serving in the Hispanic Apostolate throughout the Archdiocese.

Sunday, October 28, 2012
6:00 p.m. (Procession)
6:30 p.m. (Mass)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103

An entrance procession of national flags and banners depicting patron saints of the 20 Latin American countries of Hispanic heritage, as well as the Papal and American flags, opens the Mass. Participants are encouraged to dress in the traditional attire of their countries of origin. The Mass draws faithful from around the region to celebrate the diversity and unity of the Hispanic Catholic community. All are invited to attend.

This marks Bishop Nelson J. Perez's first visit to Philadelphia since being ordained a bishop. A Philadelphia priest, Bishop Perez was most recently pastor of Saint Agnes Parish in West Chester (Chester County).

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Editor's Note: For more information call the Office for Hispanic Catholics at 215-667-2820 or visit www.hispaniccatholicoffice.org


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Office Of Catholic Education Information On Inclement Weather

October 26, 2012

Office of Catholic Education Information on Inclement Weather


The Office of Catholic Education is mindful of the approaching storm and is actively monitoring the situation. We will be communicating any changes to normal school schedules.

Please tune in to local media outlets for information on school delays or closings. If your school is located in a suburban county make sure that you know your school closing number. Schools in the city of Philadelphia please listen to KYW News Radio or area tv stations.

The safety of your children is of the utmost importance to us and we will continue to keep you posted as we learn more.

# # #


Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialst
215-587-3747

Archdiocesan Schools In Philadelphia Closed Monday And Tuesday Due To Hurricane

October 28, 2012

Archdiocesan Schools in Philadelphia Closed Monday and Tuesday
Due to Hurricane


Archdiocesan high schools and parish elementary schools in the city of Philadelphia will be closed on both Monday, October 29, 2012 and Tuesday, October 30, 2012 due to Hurricane Sandy.

The decision regarding the schools on Tuesday is being made now because of the severity of the storm. The Office of Catholic Education wants to give parents as much notice as possible and recognizes that with the arrival of the storm many families may be without power and not have access to tv, radio or internet on Monday.

We urge everyone to be safe and follow the precautions from civic officials.

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Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Releases Comprehensive Policies For The Protection Of Children And Young People These Polices, Which Have Guided The Archdiocese's Actions Since The 2011 Grand Jury Report, Directly Address The Report Concerns About How Allegations Are Received, Reported, Investigated And Reviewed

October 31, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA RELEASES
COMPREHENSIVE POLICIES FOR THE PROTECTION
OF CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE

These polices, which have guided the Archdiocese's actions since the 2011 Grand Jury Report, directly address the report concerns about how allegations are received, reported, investigated and reviewed


The Archdiocese of Philadelphia today officially released its updated policies for the protection of children and young people, which become effective November 1st. These policies, developed and provisionally implemented since the release of the 2011 Grand Jury Report, address how allegations of child sexual abuse and violations of The Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries are received, reported, investigated and reviewed; how victim services are provided and how assignments of extern as well as religious priests are handled. These revised policies were developed through consultation with county district attorneys' offices and experts in the field of child sexual abuse.

"No entity in the United States today-Catholic or otherwise-seeks more earnestly than our Archdiocese to prevent the sexual abuse of children. These policies and procedures are a clear indication of that commitment," said Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. He continued, "While recently codified these same policies have actually guided our practices for more than a year. They'll be reviewed on a regular basis and updated as circumstances require. I believe that we can be proud of the great effort and sincere determination to protecting young people that went into these policies. It's important to remember that even the best policies depend on our earnest dedication to live and enforce them. I'm committed to act accordingly now and in the future."

The new policies include some key changes put in effect since the 2011 Grand Jury Report. The policies establish a separate Office of Investigations to ensure immediate referral of any complaints to law enforcement. According to the policy, every complaint is logged and each allegation is promptly reviewed to determine whether interim restrictions on ministry or employment should be imposed. In a change from practice pre-2011, all complaints against clergy that involve minors, even those solely involving violations of The Standards of Ministerial Behavior and Boundaries are now sent to the Archdiocesan Review Board, which functions as a confidential, advisory committee to the Archbishop, providing recommendations in the assessment of allegations of abuse and suitability for ministry. Also included in the policies is a codification of steps to ensure that any cleric seeking to minister in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia is screened in a consistent and through manner.

Mr. Arnold Gordon, former Philadelphia First Assistant District Attorney and current Vice Chair of the Archdiocesan Review Board, said, "The revised Policies and Procedures constitute significant evidence of the commitment of the Philadelphia Archdiocese to a zero tolerance policy toward the sexual abuse of minors."

In addition to the new policies and procedures, the Archdiocese has taken other significant steps over the last year to reform and improve the manner in which it lives up to its duty to protect children, including: training more than 35,000 Archdiocesan employees and volunteers to be mandatory reporters and separating the investigative from the victims assistance functions.

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Editor's Note: For the executive summary and the complete policies for the protection of children and young people visit www.archphila.org.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: The Only Thing That Really Matters Is To Be A Saint

October 29, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
THE ONLY THING THAT REALLY MATTERS IS TO BE A SAINT


A friend of mine quipped recently that the real religion of Americans has nothing to do with churches or synagogues. Our "real" religion is politics and the juggling for power it involves. He was being humorous. But as I write these words in late October, and we head into the final days of another, uniquely important, presidential election, his words don't seem quite so funny.

In the heat of ugly political conflicts, we can easily lose sight of our real vocation as Christians: holiness. We're called to be in the world but not of the world. Powers and nations - including our own - sooner or later pass away. God's word does not pass away. Neither does the witness of the holy men and women we call saints, and whose memory we celebrate on All Saints Day and throughout the month of November. Politics is important. But in the end, all of the passion, all of the egos and even all of the issues in this election will fade. In the end, as the great French Catholic writer Leon Bloy once said, the only thing that matters is to be a saint.

I remembered Bloy's words in a vivid way on October 21 as I took part in the canonization of Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha. Kateri - known around the world as the "Lilly of the Mohawks" and now our nation's first Native American saint - was born in 1656 and orphaned soon after by smallpox. She was raised by relatives who hated Christianity because of the arrogance and brutality of French colonists and the diseases they brought with them. But something in the beauty of the Gospel touched Kateri's heart. At the age of 18, she began instruction in the Catholic faith in secret. Her relatives eventually relented and allowed her to be baptized. But she suffered rough treatment and intense ridicule from her own people, and constant health problems. Throughout her short life she tended to the elderly and sick, taught the faith to children, and was known for her love of Mary and the Eucharist. She died at 24, in 1680. Her last words were "Jesus, Mary, I love you."

Kateri Tekakwitha's canonization has been longed for by the American Indian community for many, many decades. As a member of the Potawatomi tribe myself, I grew up praying to her and asking for her intercession - and waiting for the Universal Church to someday celebrate the purity of her witness. Her life embodied a simple love for Jesus and his cross; a profound affection for her Native American community; and a heroic fidelity, humility and innocence.

One of the greatest issues for Native Americans and other ethnic communities in the Church today is inculturation, the process by which the Gospel becomes an integral part of a people's soul and way of life. Blessed Pope John Paul II once said that whenever a new culture meets the Gospel in an authentic way, three things happen: The culture itself is purified; the gifts of the culture are brought into the life of the Church; and, as a result, both the culture and the Church are made stronger and more beautiful.

Kateri and saints like her are perfect examples of true inculturation. By their lives of holiness, their cultures are purified and enriched, and through their holiness, the Church is made stronger and more glorious in her diversity.

Today, the Native American Catholic community and the whole Church thank God for the gift of Saint Kateri. Holiness is always God's work before it's our work. But in Saint Kateri we now have an example of the Church becoming ever more Catholic, ever more holy; and the naturally good qualities of Native American culture are enlivened by the gift of the Gospel.

One final point is worth noting from my days in Rome. Kateri was canonized with six other new saints, among them Saint Marianne Cope, a Franciscan sister of the Diocese of Syracuse, New York. Saint Marianne died in service to the lepers of Hawaii. She belonged to a religious community that grew out of the Franciscan sisters founded by Saint John Neumann. So Philadelphia had a role - indirect and invisible, but real -- in the development of yet another holy woman who became a saint. It's not surprising. Philadelphia is the diocese of American saints. But we can't ever be content with sainthood as part of our past. God made each of us to be saints. That means you and me. The hunger for holiness needs to animate every moment of our lives - today, right now, and into the future.

The only thing that matters is to be a saint. Kateri understood that. More than 330 years later, what a joy and a glory it is to celebrate her memory. May she pray for all of us, and lead us on the same path of love she followed home to God.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Statement Of Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.f.m. Cap. Regarding Hurricane Sandy

October 29, 2012

STATEMENT OF ARCHBISHOP CHARLES J. CHAPUT, O.F.M. CAP.
REGARDING HURRICANE SANDY


Every election year Americans argue about the scale and role of government. This year is no different. In Catholic thought, government has an important but carefully limited role, with a special stress on local accountability and ensuring public safety. This year, a storm like Hurricane Sandy has the power to show public officials at their best or worst.

While Sandy is far from over, Philadelphia's Mayor Michael Nutter, Pennsylvania's Governor Tom Corbett and other governors and mayors of the tri-state area have so far responded quickly and vigorously in serving their people where it matters most - at the local and state levels, where the "common good" has flesh and blood meaning.

Governor Corbett and Mayor Nutter, as well as all of our region's emergency responders, have the gratitude of the whole Catholic community.

As the storm continues, Catholic Human Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and its programs remain operational in the community. Our service centers are available for shelter should community members need them. While we do not have active disaster relief in place during the storm, we will cooperate fully with the Red Cross and government agencies to provide food, alternate shelter and financial relief as needed after the storm.

Please pray for all those persons injured or forced to leave their homes because of this extraordinary weather disaster.

+Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.
Archbishop of Philadelphia


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Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archdiocesan Schools In Philadelphia Will Re-open On Wednesday, October 31, 2012

October 30, 2012

Archdiocesan Schools in Philadelphia Will Re-Open on
Wednesday, October 31, 2012


Archdiocesan high schools and parish elementary schools in the city of Philadelphia will re-open on Wednesday, October 31, 2012 on a normal schedule.

Decisions regarding the re-opening of Archdiocesan high schools and parish elementary schools in the suburban counties are made on the local level. School families in those areas should check normal communication channels to see if their school is re-opening tomorrow.

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Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Blessing Of Hot Lunch Program

November 7, 2012

BLESSING OF HOT LUNCH PROGRAM


Nutritional Development Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia marks the start of the School Lunch Program at the newly formed Blessed Trinity Regional Catholic School with a special blessing of the program in the school cafeteria on:

Wednesday, November 7, 2012
10:30 a.m.
Blessed Trinity Regional Catholic School
3033 Levick Street
Philadelphia, PA 19149


Blessed Trinity Regional Catholic School's community is composed of students from Saint John Cantius Parish, Saint Timothy Parish and All Saints Parish. Father Stephen Leva, Pastor of Saint Timothy Parish, and Father Joseph Zingaro, Pastor of Saint John Cantius Parish will be on hand to bless the students and staff.

Nutritional Development Services (NDS) provides healthy, affordable meals to students attending more than one hundred Catholic, Charter, and private elementary schools throughout Southeastern Pennsylvania's five counties. NDS schools meals are funded in part through the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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Editor's Note: For more information, please contact Anne H. Ayella at 267-262-8901.
For more information about Nutritional Development Services please visit www.ndsarch.org.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Award Winning Choir From London To Perform In Cathedral Basilica Concert Series

November 7, 2012

Award Winning Choir from London to Perform in
Cathedral Basilica Concert Series


The latest performance of the Cathedral Basilica Concert series features the BBC Choral Award winning, Tenebrae Choir of London. The choir will perform by candlelight, with selections including Russian masterworks interspersed with contemporary compositions. Tickets are available for purchase on-line and by phone. Visit www.cathedralphilaconcerts.org, call 215-587-3696 or email concerts@adphila.org.


Friday, November 9, 2012
8:00 p.m.
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103




The Tenebrae Choir was founded ten years ago and is considered one of Great Britain's leading chamber choirs. Friday evening's performance will include works from Rachmaninoff and Tchaikovsky.

The 2012-2013 season of Concerts at the Cathedral Basilica offers an opportunity to experience both local and international musicians in the sonic splendor of the historic Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul in Philadelphia.



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Contact
Bonnie Olinger
Communications Assistant
215-587-3747

Our Lady Of Confidence Day School To Celebrate "Confidence Day"

November 7, 2012

OUR LADY OF CONFIDENCE DAY SCHOOL TO CELEBRATE
"CONFIDENCE DAY"


Our Lady of Confidence Day School, located at Saint David Parish in Willow Grove (Montgomery County), is celebrating its school community with "Confidence Day."

The mission of this school is to facilitate the complete development of students with intellectual disabilities to their fullest potential: spiritually, intellectually, vocationally, physically and emotionally.

This special day will begin with an explanation of the school's programs followed by a question and answer period. Student led tours will take groups throughout the school and visit each classroom. "Confidence Day" will conclude with a prayer service.

Thursday, November 8, 2012
Our Lady of Confidence Day School - Saint David Parish (Willow Grove)
314 North Easton Road
Willow Grove, PA 19090 (Montgomery County)
9:30 a.m. Arrival
10:15 a.m. Student led tours
11:15 a.m. Prayer service


The school's program is rooted in Gospel love and embraces the value of life. Our Lady of Confidence Day School is committed to guiding students on the path to independence so they may become vital contributing members of society. The school has a second site at Bishop McDevitt High School in Wyncote (Montgomery County).

Our Lady of Confidence Day School is one of four schools of special education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, which is now managed and supported by the Faith in the Future Foundation. For more information about Our Lady of Confidence Day School please visit www.ourladyofconfidence.org. For more information about Faith in the Future, please visit www.faithinthefuture.com.


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Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: What A 'community Of Believers' Really Means

November 8, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
WHAT A 'COMMUNITY OF BELIEVERS' REALLY MEANS


Another election has come and gone, and when the complaining dies down, most of us will go back to our everyday lives without a blink. Politics is important. On some issues, it's deadly serious. But most of the time, for most people, political passion is viral: It appears and disappears like the flu every campaign season.

Hurricane Sandy has come and gone as well. But its human imprint, its extraordinary devastation and suffering, will be with us for a very long time.

During my years of service in South Dakota and Colorado, hurricanes seemed part of another America. The people of the western states had their own serious natural disasters: forest fires, droughts and tornadoes, but nothing on the scale of Katrina or Irene. Catholics in Rapid City and Denver raised money many times for storm victims in Florida, Louisiana, Texas and other states, and abroad. But the idea of water drowning an entire major city like New Orleans - a city right here in the United States -- seemed faraway and impossible, even while watching the catastrophe unfold on television.

It's a very different experience when the hurricane is bearing down on your own people, their families and homes, and their neighbors. That's when the power of such a storm begins to become real. Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter and Pennsylvania Governor Tom Corbett both did an outstanding job of public leadership throughout the storm and its aftermath. Like many other people in the Philadelphia area, I rode out Hurricane Sandy as a particularly bad storm -- expecting the worst, but never even losing power.

Hundreds of thousands of other people across the five counties of the archdiocese were not so lucky. Bucks and Montgomery were especially hard hit. Many families lost power and heat, and even water and telephone communications, for up to a week or more. Others have homes with severe wind and tree damage. Some of our parishes celebrated Sunday Mass, November 4, by candle light.

As painful as Sandy was for Pennsylvania though, the real carnage of the storm, with its loss of life and immense destruction of property, fell on New Jersey and New York. The images of devastation from Staten Island, Atlantic City and other surrounding communities are astonishing. They're heart-breaking. Local Catholic dioceses, along with numerous volunteers and other relief organizations, are working hard to help the storm's victims. But recovery will be a long road. Relief efforts need all the help they can get from neighboring dioceses and around the country.

The Catholic Charities USA (CCUSA) Disaster Response Office is coordinating Church efforts to assist the victims of Sandy. Up to 50 Catholic Charities agencies will be involved, and donated resources will go to case management and emergency assistance, cleaning and house repairs, emergency evacuation assistance and long-term recovery needs. Financial contributions can be made by phone at 1.800.919.9338. Donations can also be made securely on the CCUSA website at: https://www.catholiccharitiesusa.org/sslpage.aspx?pid=2357

A Christian community - a community of believers in Jesus Christ; a community of his disciples - defines itself by the generosity of its people. Catholics in Philadelphia and throughout Pennsylvania have again and again shown their willingness to help other people in need, and especially the victims of disaster. Please give your financial support to these vital Sandy relief efforts through Catholic Charities USA. And please be as generous as you can.

At the discretion of local pastors, an optional special collection will be taken up at Sunday Masses in parishes across the Archdiocese on the weekend following Thanksgiving, November 24-25. All contributed funds will be provided to Catholic Social Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, which will use the donated resources to assist Sandy storm victims locally and in other dioceses. Please join the Archbishop in praying for all those affected by Hurricane Sandy. Thank you for your help and your good will.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput Calls For Hurricane Sandy Relief Efforts In Archdiocese Of Philadelphia

November 8, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT CALLS FOR HURRICANE SANDY
RELIEF EFFORTS IN ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has invited all 257 parishes in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia to consider taking up a special second collection for relief efforts in the wake of Hurricane Sandy during the weekend of November 24-25, 2012.

In his column on CatholicPhilly.com this week, Archbishop Chaput said, "Hurricane Sandy's human imprint, its extraordinary devastation and suffering will be with us for a very long time . . . A Christian community-a community of believers in Jesus Christ-defines itself by the generosity of its people. Catholics in Philadelphia have again and again shown their willingness to help other people in need, and especially the victims of disaster."

All contributed funds will support Catholic Social Services' relief efforts for hurricane victims locally and in other dioceses.

The collection, which is optional, will take place at Masses on the weekend following Thanksgiving. It is hoped that, as people take the opportunity to express gratitude for the blessings present in their lives, they will be as generous as possible to those who are still lacking basic necessities and common comforts.

# # #


Editor's Note: To read Archbishop Chaput's column regarding Hurricane Sandy relief efforts please visit www.catholicphilly.com. For information on Catholic Social Services in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia please visit www.catholicsocialservicesphilly.org.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

>Archdiocesan Senior Citizens To Present Healing Quilt In Support Of Victims Of Sexual Abuse

November 8, 2012

ARCHDIOCESAN SENIOR CITIZENS TO PRESENT
HEALING QUILT IN SUPPORT OF VICTIMS OF SEXUAL ABUSE


Members of a senior citizens network in the Archdiocese will present a hand-made healing quilt in support of victims of sexual abuse to the Archdiocesan Office for Child and Youth Protection following a Memorial Mass for its members who have died.

Friday, November 9, 2012
12:45 p.m.
Archdiocesan Pastoral Center (Auditorium)
222 North 17th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Members of the network developed the concept of the "healing quilt" and asked volunteers to knit pocket sized prayer squares, each featuring a cross in the center. A total of 63 squares were joined together to form the finished quilt, symbolizing the warm, loving care and spiritual union that comes from prayer. All crafters were asked to pray for healing for victims of clergy sexual abuse.

Ms. Leslie Davila, Director of the Office for Child and Youth Protection, said, "The quilt is a visible symbol that people care and are praying for victims of clergy sexual abuse. I hope to use the quilt to promote the message of healing and caring for all victims. I encourage victims to contact my office if they would like to obtain an individual prayer square."

The senior citizens will continue to knit additional prayer squares, which will be donated to the Office for Child and Youth Protection for them to distribute. Anyone is welcome to join their efforts by crafting prayer squares. Patterns can be obtained online at www.crochetcabana.com/charity/charity-patterns.htm. Victims of clergy sexual abuse who wish to obtain a prayer square should call the Office for Child and Youth Protection at 215-587-3880.

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Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Faith In The Future And The Office Of Catholic Education Launch Comprehensive Marketing Campaign, Choose My Future Campaign Seeks To Educate And Empower Students And Parents To Choose The Catholic High School In The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia That Best Meets Their Needs

November 12, 2012

Faith in the Future and the Office of Catholic Education Launch Comprehensive Marketing Campaign,
CHOOSE MY FUTURE

Campaign seeks to educate and empower students and parents to choose the Catholic high school in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia that best meets their needs


Faith in the Future, the first-of-its-kind independent foundation providing strategic management and operational oversight for the 17 Catholic high schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, in collaboration with the Office of Catholic Education (OCE), today announced the launch of Choose My Future. This new marketing initiative focuses on driving awareness, increasing visits, and boosting enrollment in the Philadelphia area's Catholic high schools. Choose My Future highlights the benefits of Catholic education at the secondary level through radio and online advertising, a microsite enabling Open House registration for all 17 schools. In addition, upgrades to the OCE website will provide important application and registration information to students and parents.

"Faith in the Future is steadfastly committed to changing the way we conduct business and recruit students to our Philadelphia area Catholic high schools," said Samuel Casey Carter, Chief Executive Officer of the Faith in the Future. "Choose My Future will continue our work toward growing enrollment and is part of a larger effort to reinvigorate Catholic education and re-engage our enthusiastic and devoted alumni by highlighting the individual excellence and collective greatness of the Catholic high schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia."

The Choose My Future microsite will feature an inspiring video showcasing - and differentiating - the Catholic high school experience within the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. The video, entitled "We Believe," embodies the academics, athletics, service, faith, sense of community and passion that more than 14,000 students feel for their Catholic high schools.

"The 'We Believe' video highlights the unique opportunities that our Catholic high school system provides through a combination of high quality education, athletics and faith in a nurturing environment that encourages collaboration and cultivates a lifelong relationship between our students and their schools," said Carter. "As part of our renewed promise to students and parents, we will incorporate many of the best practices seen at these individual schools into the entire system to ensure that students desiring a Catholic education know about all of the great things being offered by our Catholic high schools today."

To view "We Believe" or to register for an upcoming Open House at any of our 17 Catholic high schools, please visit www.choosemyfuture.org. To learn more about Catholic high schools within the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, visit www.catholicschools-phl.org/our-schools/high-schools. For more information about the Faith in the Future and its support of these high schools, please visit www.faithinthefuture.com.

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Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Nutritional Development Services Awarded Conagra Foods Foundation Grant Nds Is One Of 19 Agencies Nationwide To Receive A "nourish Our Community" Grant

November 12, 2012

NUTRITIONAL DEVELOPMENT SERVICES
AWARDED CONAGRA FOODS FOUNDATION GRANT

NDS is one of 19 agencies nationwide to receive a "Nourish Our Community" grant


Nutritional Development Services (NDS) of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia is one of only 19 agencies in the country to receive a 2012 ConAgra Foods Foundation Nourish Our Community Grant. The award amount is $12,500. These awards are presented annually to non-profit organizations that provide exceptional service to communities where ConAgra Foods has operations.

A check presentation with representatives from the ConAgra Foods Foundation and NDS will take place at the Divine Mercy Food Cupboard in Southwest Philadelphia.

Tuesday, November 13, 2012
11:30 a.m.
Divine Mercy Food Cupboard
(Located behind Divine Mercy Parish Rectory)
6667 Chester Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19147


Funds from the ConAgra grant will be used to purchase food for the 35 food cupboards NDS assists in the Philadelphia region. It will supplement operating funds from the Archdiocese of Philadelphia Catholic Charities Appeal and food collected by schools, parishes, and religious education programs. According to Anne Ayella, Assistant Director for Non-Government Programs and Community Relations at NDS, "Funds from the ConAgra grant will be used to purchase food in greatest demand at these sites."

Last Year, NDS food cupboards assisted 376,580 senior citizens, adults and children as part of its effort to combat hunger in the greater Philadelphia area.

# # #


Editor's Note: For more information on the check presentation, please contact Anne H. Ayella at 267-262-8901. For more information about Nutritional Development Services please visit www.ndsarch.org.

For more information on the Catholic Charities Appeal visit www.catholiccharitiesappeal.org.

For more information on ConAgra Foods Foundation visit www.conagrafoods.com or call 402-240-6303.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Catholic Life Congress 2012 Baptized In Christ: Live In The Joy Of Believing

November 13, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA
CATHOLIC LIFE CONGRESS 2012

Baptized in Christ: Live in the Joy of Believing


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will open the 2012 Catholic Life Congress with the celebration of Mass.

This educational gathering for faithful, religious, deacons and priests features keynote speakers, presentations and workshops geared toward faith formation and educational development. It is designed to benefit those who wish to learn more about the Church, its teachings and practices with a specific focus on those who serve as lay leaders in their parish communities.

Congress presentations will feature insightful and engaging speakers on the topics of the new evangelization and the many ways our faith is lived out with joy.

Saturday, November 17, 2012
Opening Mass- 9:00 a.m.
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103

Catholic Life Congress- 10:00 a.m. to 3:15 p.m.
The Sheraton Hotel
17th and Race Streets
Philadelphia, PA 19103


The keynote speakers are Archbishop José Gomez from the Archdiocese of Los Angeles and Dr. Jonathan Reyes, Executive Director of the Department of Justice, Peace and Human Development for the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops.

This year's theme is "Baptized in Christ: Live in the Joy of Believing." It is based on Pope Benedict XVI's Apostolic Letter, Porta Fidei, which calls all Catholics to reflect upon and renew their encounter with Jesus Christ.

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Editor's Note: To obtain more information or to register for Catholic Life Congress please call
215-587-0500 or visit www.phillycongress.org.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocesan Students And Nutritional Development Services Team Up To Fight Hunger 65,000 Pounds Of Peanut Butter And Jelly Collected To Stock Local Food Cupboards

November 14, 2012

ARCHDIOCESAN STUDENTS AND NUTRITIONAL DEVELOPMENT SERVICES
TEAM UP TO FIGHT HUNGER

65,000 Pounds of peanut butter and jelly collected to stock local food cupboards


What:
Nutritional Development Services (NDS) of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will celebrate the successful completion of its 2012 Peanut Butter and Jelly Drive in conjunction with Archdiocesan schools and outreach programs on Friday, November 16, 2012 at Little Flower High School in North Philadelphia. Students will present NDS the PB&J collected by their school.

More than 65,000 pounds of PB&J have been collected since September 10, 2012.

When:
Friday, November 16, 2012
10:00 a.m.

Where:
Little Flower High School
1000 West Lycoming Street
Philadelphia, PA 19140

Nutritional Development Services provides meals, food assistance and additional support to organizations serving children and the poor as an extension of the services and mission of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. The PB&J drive helps keep the 35 food cupboards serviced by NDS stocked with peanut butter and jelly for the year.

Little Flower High School and its Community Service Corps have been faithful supporters of this drive and other NDS initiatives.

Key Visuals:

# Little Flower students presenting their contribution for the PB&J drive to NDS representatives

# Additional quantities of PB&J collected at other schools

Key Participants:

# Anne Ayella, Assistant Director for Community Relations, NDS
# Denise Hopkins, Administrator for Community Food Program, NDS
# Sister Donna Shallo, I.H.M., President, Little Flower Catholic High School for Girls
# Ms. Brooke Hauer, Community Service Corps. Moderator, Little Flower H.S.

# # #


Editor's Note: To find out more about Nutritional Development Services visit www.ndsarch.org/.
For more information about schools in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia visit www.catholicschools-phl.org.




Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Ryan Academy For The Deaf Celebrates 100th Anniversary Archbishop Chaput To Celebrate Mass

November 15, 2012

ARCHBISHOP RYAN ACADEMY FOR THE DEAF
CELEBRATES 100th ANNIVERSARY
Archbishop Chaput to Celebrate Mass


Archbishop Ryan Academy for the Deaf in the Juniata Park section of Philadelphia is celebrating 100 years of educating deaf and hard of hearing students. Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. will celebrate a special Mass recognizing this milestone.

Sunday, November 18, 2012
12:00 p.m.
Holy Innocents Parish
L Street and Hunting Park Avenue
Philadelphia, PA 19124


Following Mass, Archbishop Ryan Academy for the Deaf and Saint Lucy Day School for Children with Visual Impairments will host an Open House. Both schools are located on the campus of Holy Innocents Parish.

Students attending Archbishop Ryan Academy for the Deaf are educated by the Sisters, Servants of the Immaculate Heart of Mary and dedicated lay staff teachers. The school's mission is to provide a spiritual environment with education based on faith and centered upon language. This philosophy recognizes that each child is endowed with diverse and valuable gifts and focuses on teaching language development combined with American Sign Language. The teachers encourage, and nurture each child's potential, empowering students to become successful members of the society in which they live and work.

Archbishop Ryan Academy for the Deaf is one of four schools of special education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia which is now managed and supported by Faith in the Future. For more information about Archbishop Ryan Academy for the Deaf please visit www.slds.org/index.html. For more information about Faith in the Future, please visit www.faithinthefuture.com.

# # #




Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Column: Christian Faith and God's Hand in History

November 15, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
CHRISTIAN FAITH AND GOD'S HAND IN HISTORY


In this Year of Faith, and especially as we celebrate the Solemnity of Christ the King (Nov. 25) and the beginning of Advent (Dec. 2), it's a good time to reflect on the nature of what we believe as Catholics.

To be a Christian is to believe in history. I mean that in the way the great Catholic historian, Christopher Dawson, meant it. Dawson wrote: "Christianity, together with the religion of Israel out of which it was born, is a historical religion in a sense to which none of the other world religions can lay claim."

Consider the Bible. All of the world's great religious and ethical traditions have sacred books: the Qu'ran, the Bhagavad-Gita; the Analects of Confucius. What all these texts of other traditions share is that they're essentially wisdom literature. They're collections of teachings aimed at helping believers live ethically and find the right path to happiness or enlightenment.

The Bible also aims to make people wise. But it also seeks to lead them to salvation, which is much more than enlightenment. The Bible's first words are: "In the beginning . . ." Genesis begins with the first day in the history of the world. The entire Old Testament is similar. After speaking about the first man and woman and their descendants, it proceeds to offer a historical account of God's chosen people, the children of Israel. Modern scholarship can challenge details of the Old Testament narrative, but the importance that biblical writers place on providing a history is unmistakable.

The New Testament continues that history, focusing on one particular child of Israel, Jesus of Nazareth, and the community he founded, the Church. The story is told with numerous references -- some direct, others subtle -- to that earlier history. Jesus is portrayed as fulfilling all that God promised in the Old Testament. The Church is described as the new people of God, the final realization of Israel's calling to be God's light to the nations.

Throughout the New Testament, we're given precise historical markers. To be a Christian therefore means believing very definite things about history and about our own respective places in history.

We don't just profess belief in the Incarnation. We say we believe that God took flesh at a precise moment in time, and in a definite place. It's the reason for that curious detail in our Nicene and Apostles' Creeds: We're the only religion to remember our founder's executioner by name every time we profess our faith.

Pontius Pilate and Mary are mentioned by name in the creeds. Why? The reference to Mary, Jesus' mother, guarantees Christ's humanity. The reference to Pilate, who condemned him to death, guarantees his historicity. It ensures that we can never reduce the Incarnation to an abstract concept, a metaphor, or a pretty idea. It ensures that we can never regard Jesus Christ as a kind of ideal archetype or mythical figure. He was truly a man and truly God. And he had a place on this earth he called home.

We also believe that this historical event, more than 2,000 years ago, represents a personal intervention by God "for us and for our salvation." God entered history for you and me, and for all humanity.

The four noble truths of Buddhism don't have anything to do with history. The Muslim profession of faith, the shahada, claims simply that there is no God but God, and that Muhammad was his messenger. To the degree that Islam has a historical narrative, it was arguably borrowed from and built on the Jewish-Christian narrative that preceded it.

Thus, to be Catholic is to be very unique among the world's believers. To be a Catholic means believing that we are a part of a vast historical project. And it's not "our" project. It's God's. Being Catholic means believing that since the beginning of time, God has been working out his own hidden purposes in the history of nations and in the biography of every person. He's still unfolding his purposes today. And each of us has a part to play in his divine plan.

Before the foundation of the world, God had each of us in mind. He made us out of love. And he made us for a reason: to be holy; to be his sons and daughters through Jesus Christ; to help him share his love with the whole world.

We believe in God. But as God's hand in history also clearly shows: He believes in us.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Cardinal O'hara High School Students Work With New Jersey National Guard To Assist Hurricane Sandy Victims

November 19, 2012

Cardinal O'Hara High School Students Work With
New Jersey National Guard to Assist Hurricane Sandy Victims


Students from Cardinal O'Hara High School in Springfield (Delaware County) collected non-perishable food items, toiletries, cleaning supplies and other basic essentials for victims of Hurricane Sandy during the week of November 12th.

These items will be picked up by the New Jersey National Guard tomorrow. Details for the pick-up are below.

Tuesday, November 20, 2012
10:00 a.m.
Cardinal O'Hara High School
1701 South Sproul Road
Springfield, 19064 (Delaware County)


Cardinal O'Hara High School is one of 17 high schools and four schools of special education managed and supported by Faith in the Future. For more information about Cardinal O'Hara High School please visit www.cohs.com/. For more information about Faith in the Future, please visit www.faithinthefuture.com.

# # #



Contact
Meredith Wilson
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

This Thanksgiving: Rekindling The Fire Of Holiness Weekly Column By Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.f.m. Cap. November 21, 2012

November 21, 2012

THIS THANKSGIVING: REKINDLING THE FIRE OF HOLINESS

Weekly Column by Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap.
November 21, 2012


The Church has many good reasons why people should believe in God, believe in Jesus Christ and believe in the beauty and urgency of her own mission. But she has only one irrefutable argument for the truth of what she teaches - the personal example of her saints.

Over this Thanksgiving weekend, or sometime during Advent, I have a homework assignment for you. I want you to rent or buy or borrow a copy of the 1966 film about Sir Thomas More, A Man for All Seasons. I want you to watch it with your family. Here's why. More was one of the most distinguished scholars of his time, a brilliant lawyer, a gifted diplomat and a skilled political leader. Jonathan Swift, the great Anglo-Irish writer, once described him as the "person of the greatest virtue this kingdom (of England) ever produced."

Above all, Thomas More was a man of profound Catholic faith and practice. He lived what he claimed to believe. He had his priorities in right order. He was a husband and a father first; a man who - in the words of Robert Bolt, the author of the original play and the 1966 film - "adored, and was adored, by his own large family."

A Man for All Seasons won Oscars for both Best Picture and Best Actor, and it's clearly one of the great stories ever brought to the screen. But it captures only a small fraction of the real man. In his daily life, Thomas More loved to laugh. He enjoyed life and every one of its gifts. Erasmus, the great Dutch humanist scholar and a friend of More and his family, described More as a man of "amiable joyousness (and) simple dress … born and framed for friendship … easy of access to all," uninterested in ceremony and riches, humble, indifferent to food, unimpressed by opinions of the crowd, and never departing from common sense.

Despite the integrity of More's character, and despite his faithful service, Henry VIII martyred him in 1535. More refused to accept the Tudor king's illicit marriage to Anne Boleyn, and he refused to repudiate his fidelity to the Holy See. In 1935, the Church declared Thomas More a saint. Today - half a millennium after he died and a continent away -- this one man's faith still moves us in our own daily lives. That's the power of sainthood. That's the power of holiness. Here's the lesson I want to leave you with this week. We're all called to martyrdom. That's what the word martyr means: It's the Greek word for "witness." We may or may not ever suffer personally for our love of Jesus Christ. But we're all called to be witnesses.

In proclaiming the Year of Faith, Benedict XVI wrote that:
"By faith, across the centuries, men and women of all ages, whose names are written in the Book of Life … have confessed the beauty of following the Lord Jesus wherever they were called to bear witness to the fact that they were Christian: in the family, in the workplace, in public life, in the exercise of the charisms and ministries to which they were called."

The only thing that matters is to be a saint. That's what we need to be. That's what we need to become. And if we can serve God through the witness of our lives by kindling that fire of holiness again in the heart of our local parishes and communities, then the Christ Child who comes to us at Christmas will make all things new - in our Church, in our families and in our nation.

May God grant us all a joy-filled and blessed Thanksgiving.



Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director
215-587-3747

Celebrating Our Lady Of Guadalupe With Las Mañanitas Pilgrimage From Philadelphia Parishes To Cathedral Basilica

November 30, 2012

CELEBRATING OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE WITH
LAS MAÑANITAS

Pilgrimage from Philadelphia Parishes to Cathedral Basilica


The Hispanic Community of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will gather in anticipation of the feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe (December 12th) to celebrate Las Mañanitas (a traditional serenading of Our Lady on the vigil of her feast day) followed by Mass. Bishop John J. McIntyre will be the celebrant and homilist.

Tuesday, December 11, 2012
8:45 p.m. Procession
9:00 p.m. Mass (full schedule below)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Faithful from several parishes in the city of Philadelphia will process to the Cathedral on foot.
The celebration will conclude with an indoor procession in the Cathedral and a presentation of roses to Our Lady of Guadalupe. All are invited to attend.

Pilgrims from Saint Joan of Arc Parish, Visitation B.V.M Parish, Saint Michael Parish, and Saint Peter the Apostle Parish are expected to process on foot from North Philadelphia to the Cathedral. They will be accompanied by a live band beginning at Visitation B.V.M. Parish as they process south.

Parishioners from Saint Thomas Aquinas and Annunciation B.V.M. in South Philadelphia will process from Saint Thomas Aquinas Church to the Cathedral. Saint Thomas is located at 1719 Morris Street, Philadelphia, PA 19145.

4:30 p.m.: Visitation parishioners depart from "B" St. and Lehigh Ave.
The Procession picks up Saint Peter the Apostle (2nd St. and Girard Ave.) and Saint Michael parishioners (2nd and Jefferson Sts.)
Expected arrival time is 8:00 p.m.

6:00 p.m.: Rosary at Saint Thomas Aquinas Parish
7:00 p.m.: Procession from Saint Thomas Aquinas Parish to the Cathedral
8:00 p.m.: Arrival at the Cathedral and commencement of Las Mañanitas (serenading by
el Mariachi Flores and the faithful)
9:00 p.m.: Mass with Mariachi Music

Parishioners from the Chapel of the Miraculous Medal (La Milagrosa) will depart from 19th Street and Spring Garden Avenue to the Cathedral at 7:30 p.m. traveling down 19th Street.

# # #


Editor's Note: Procession times may be subject to change. For more information, please contact the Office for Hispanic Catholics at 215-667-2820.

Procession Route for Parishes in North Philadelphia:
From Visitation Parish the procession will travel west on Lehigh Ave., down 2nd Street, meet Saint Peter the Apostle parishioners at 2nd St. and Girard Ave., continue on 2nd Street past Saint Michael Parish (where Saint Michael parishioners will join the procession), turning right on Spring Garden, and left onto 17th Street to the Cathedral.

Parishioners from the Chapel of the Miraculous Medal La Milagrosa will depart to the Cathedral at 8:00 p.m. from 19th Street and Spring Garden Avenue traveling down 19th Street.

Procession Route for Parishes in South Philadelphia:
Saint Thomas Aquinas and Annunciation B.V.M. parishioners will process from Saint Thomas Aquinas Parish (1719 Morris Street, Philadelphia 19145) turn right onto 18th Street to the Cathedral.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia To Host Year Of Faith Lecture Series Featuring Nationally Renowned Scholars And Authors Doctor Timothy Gray, President Of The Augustine Institute, To Open Series On December 13th; Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.f.m. Cap. To Present Final Lecture On October 1st Of Next Year

November 30, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA TO HOST YEAR OF FAITH LECTURE SERIES FEATURING NATIONALLY RENOWNED SCHOLARS AND AUTHORS

Doctor Timothy Gray, President of the Augustine Institute, to Open Series on December 13th; Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. to Present Final Lecture on October 1st of Next Year


The Office for Family, Life, and the Laity of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will host a special lecture series throughout the current Year of Faith called for by Pope Benedict XVI.

These programs feature nationally acclaimed speakers who will present on some of the most compelling topics related to the role of Catholic faith and identity in the modern world. The series presents an opportunity for all to come to a deeper understanding of the true meaning of Catholic faith, its authentic content, and its orientation toward the transformation of the world around us.

A complete listing of scheduled programs is below. All lectures will take place at Saint Charles Borromeo Seminary, Vianney Hall Auditorium; 100 East Wynnewood Road; Wynnewood, PA 19096 (Montgomery County).

Thursday, December 13, 2012
Speaker: Dr. Timothy Gray, President of the Augustine Institute
Topic: Advent, A Season of Hope
Time: 7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.

Thursday, May 16, 2013
Speaker: Dr. Helen Alvaré, Associate Professor of Law, George Mason University
Topic: Women's Freedom and Religious Freedom, Collaboration or Clash?
Time: 7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.

Thursday, September 12, 2013
Speaker: Dr. Brad Gregory, the Dorothy G. Griffin Professor of Early Modern European History at the University of Notre Dame
Topic: Themes from The Unintended Reformation: How a Religious Revolution Secularized Society
Time: 7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.

Thursday, September 19, 2013
Speaker: Mr. Ross Douthat, Columnist, The New York Times
Topic: Themes from Bad Religion: How We Became a Nation of Heretics
Time: 7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.

Tuesday, October 1, 2013
Speaker: Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap., Archbishop of Philadelphia
Topic: Fire Upon the Earth, A Call to Conversion and the New Evangelization
Time: 7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.

The Year of Faith currently being celebrated throughout the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and the Universal Church commemorates the 50th anniversary of the opening of the Second Vatican Council which took place on October 11, 1962. It will conclude on the Feast of Christ the King on November 24, 2013. Pope Benedict XVI has described the Year of Faith as a time to reflect upon and renew our encounter with Jesus Christ.

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Editor's Note: For additional information on this lecture series or the Year of Faith in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia please contact Mr. Steven Bozza, Director of the Office for Family, Life and the Laity or visit http://archphila.org/yearoffaith/.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Announces Retirement Of Dr. Richard Mccarron, Secretary Of Catholic Education After More Than A Quarter Century Of Service To The Archdiocese, Dr. Mccarron Will Officially Step Down On February 1, 2013

December 3, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA ANNOUNCES RETIREMENT OF
DR. RICHARD McCARRON, SECRETARY OF CATHOLIC EDUCATION

After more than a quarter century of service to the Archdiocese, Dr. McCarron will
officially step down on February 1, 2013


(PHILADELPHIA, PA - DECEMBER 3, 2012) - The Archdiocese of Philadelphia announced today that Dr. Richard McCarron, Secretary for Catholic Education for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, will retire effective February 1, 2013. During his 25 year tenure in educational leadership for the Archdiocese, Dr. McCarron exhibited an unwavering commitment to academic excellence, innovative co-curricular programs and the values that define a Catholic education in an effort to ensure all students benefited from this distinctive experience.

"Dr. McCarron has had a profound influence on Catholic education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia for more than a quarter of a century and his leadership has been defined by an abiding commitment to our students, families, administrators and teachers," said Bishop Michael J. Fitzgerald, who oversees Catholic Education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. "Dr. McCarron has helped thousands of Archdiocesan students not only pursue their dreams but embrace the power of faith in their lives. His life has been devoted to the cause of teaching our young people and for that, we are deeply grateful. We wish him and his family nothing but the best in his well-deserved retirement."

"It is time for me to step down so that new leadership can guide and direct the mission of Catholic education," said Dr. McCarron. "I have the utmost confidence that the Office of Catholic Education and Faith in the Future will establish a new educational vision that will enable our schools to grow and flourish in the years ahead. While it is difficult to step back from this role and from those whose dedication, commitment and passion for Catholic education have helped to mold thousands of students in the Catholic faith, I feel blessed for the opportunity to have worked with such devoted people."


Dr. McCarron will remain in his role while a national search is launched to secure a replacement for this position, which oversees operations for the secondary, elementary and schools of special education in the Archdiocese. This search will be conducted by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, Faith in the Future, the independent foundation that provides strategic management and operational oversight for the 17 Catholic high schools and four schools of special education in the Archdiocese, and a special selection committee comprised of educational experts and business and civic leaders. This search is the first of several initiatives in process to support the Archdiocesan elementary schools, which will be shared in the early part of the new year. To ensure a smooth transition, Dr. McCarron will remain as a consultant to the Office of Catholic Education after his February 1, 2013 retirement.

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Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Faith In The Future To Lead National Search For A New Head Of The Office Of Catholic Education

December 3, 2012

Faith in the Future to Lead National Search for a
New Head of the Office of Catholic Education


(PHILADELPHIA, PA - DECEMBER 3, 2012) - Samuel Casey Carter, CEO of Faith in the Future, a first-of-its-kind foundation that provides strategic management and operational oversight for the 17 Catholic high schools and four schools of special education in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, issued the following statement regarding the retirement of Dr. Richard McCarron as Secretary of Catholic Education for the Archdiocese of Philadelphia.

"All of us at Faith in the Future are deeply grateful for the work Richard has done," said Mr. Carter. "Today, as we aim to grow the enrollment of our schools and make quality Catholic education affordable to any family that wants it, it places a real responsibility on us to find the right leader to succeed Dr. McCarron. The Catholic schools of this Archdiocese are among the very best in the region and I am confident that we will attract top-level talent quickly to join us in this effort. Richard has very generously agreed to stay on in a consulting role even after his successor is found, so we are assured of a smooth transition going forward."

As announced by the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, a national search is now underway to fill this important role. Faith in the Future is working in close collaboration with the Archdiocese of Philadelphia and a special selection committee of educational experts and civic leaders to identify, interview and select a candidate. Faith in the Future and the Archdiocese aim to conclude this process by February 1, 2013.

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Contact
James Freeman
 
484-866-2501

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Advent, A Season Of Hope: Hearing And Sharing The Message

December 4, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
ADVENT, A SEASON OF HOPE: HEARING AND SHARING THE MESSAGE


One of the best ways to experience Advent this year is to join Dr. Tim Gray for the first talk of the Archbishop's Year of Faith Lecture Series. I've known Dr. Gray for many years as one of the finest young biblical scholars in North America - articulate, vividly engaging, and rich in the history and meaning of God's Word.

Scheduled for St. Charles Borromeo Seminary on Thursday evening, December 13, and designed for the general public, Dr. Gray's theme is "Advent: A Season of Hope." He's the right man with the right theme at the right time, and I strongly encourage Catholics across the archdiocese to spend the $5 admission to hear and share his message. We've never needed it more.

More than 50 years ago, C.S. Lewis published an ironic little essay called, "Xmas and Christmas: A Lost Chapter from Herodotus." In it, he reverses the letters of his home country, "Britain." Then he writes about the strange winter customs of a barbarian nation called Niatirb.

It's worth reading in these early days of Advent. I'll share with you just one passage.

"In the middle of winter when fogs and rains most abound, [the Niatirbians] have a great festival called Exmas, and for 50 days they prepare for it in the manner which is called, in their barbarian speech, the Exmas Rush.

"When the day of the festival comes, most of the citizens, being exhausted from the [frenzies of the] Rush, lie in bed till noon. But in the evening they eat five times as much as on other days, and crowning themselves with crowns of paper, they become intoxicated. And on the day after Exmas, they are very grave, being internally disordered by the supper and the drinking and the reckoning of how much they have spent on gifts and on the wine.

"[Now a] few among the Niatirbians have also a festival, separate and to themselves, called Crissmas, which is on the same day as Exmas. And those who keep Crissmas, doing the opposite to the majority of Niatirbians, rise early on that day with shining faces and go before sunrise to certain temples where they partake of a sacred feast.

"But [as for] what Hecataeus says, that Exmas and Crissmas are the same, [this] is not credible. It is not likely that men, even being barbarians, should suffer so many and so great things [as those involved in the Exmas Rush], in honor of a god they do not believe in."


What Lewis wrote about in Britain more than half a century ago is increasingly true about our own country today. As we begin our annual pilgrimage through Advent to the birth of Jesus, what will we do to really live this sacred season?

The world has an ingenious ability to attach itself to what Christians believe; tame it; subvert it - and then turn it against the very people who continue to believe. Too many Americans don't really celebrate Christmas. They may think they do, but they don't. They celebrate Exmas.

The world - left to its own devices - has no room and no use for the birth of Jesus Christ. It has contempt for Christians who seriously strive to be his disciples. So we have nothing to lose and everything to gain by being the saints God intended us to be. We can at least seek to be holy by tithing our time to sit quietly with God; allowing him to fill our actions and our choices with his Son; and letting him shape us into the men and women he needs. We can get up and experience the dawn in silence on these December mornings as a reminder of what Advent and Christmas mean. We can prepare ourselves to be alert for the voice of God and to receive God's word afresh and proclaim it anew.

Advent means "coming." What's coming in the reality of Christmas is an invasion. The world needs the invasion but doesn't want it. It's an invasion of human flesh and of all creation by the Son of God; by the holiness of the Creator himself.

All of us in the Church were baptized to be part of that good invasion. The doubts, the failures and the mistakes of the past don't ultimately matter. Only our choices now matter. How will we live our Christian faith from this day forward? How will we make our Catholic witness an icon of Christ's Advent?

For our own sake, and the sake of the people we hold dear, we need to pray that our love for God and for the suffering and needy persons around us, will truly reflect God's love for us. And when it does, then the world will be a different place.

Register online at http://archphila.org/yearoffaith. Or for more information, kindly contact Meghan Cokeley at 215.587.0500 or at mcokeley@adphila.org.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Donna Farrell
Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop's Annual Christmas Benefit For Children Marks Its 56th Year Celebrating A Merry Christmas And Providing A Brighter Future Full Of Promise For Thousands Of Local Children In Need

December 5, 2012

ARCHBISHOP'S ANNUAL CHRISTMAS BENEFIT FOR CHILDREN MARKS ITS 56th YEAR

Celebrating a Merry Christmas and providing a
brighter future full of promise for thousands of local children in need


The 56th annual Archbishop's Christmas Benefit for Children will host more than 400 young people who receive services from one of a dozen programs within Catholic Social Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. They represent approximately 16,000 children across the Delaware Valley who benefited from residential and community-based programs offered by Catholic Social Services this year, including children with disabilities, at-risk children, and dependent or court-adjudicated youth.

Nearly 200 Archdiocesan high school students will participate in this year's Archbishop's Christmas Benefit for Children by greeting the children, serving as Santa's elves, and providing entertainment and music. The benefit begins with a parade and will conclude with an appearance from Santa Claus to give out presents. Several Philadelphia Eagles players, cheerleaders, and the Eagles mascot, Swoop, will also join in the festivities. CBS 3/CW Philly 57's Bob Kelly, traffic anchor, will serve as emcee.

Tuesday, December 18, 2012
2:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Sheraton Philadelphia Center City Hotel
17th Street between Race and Vine Streets
Philadelphia, PA 19103


2:30 p.m. Parade of marching bands, clowns, cartoon character and jugglers enters ballroom;
2:50 p.m. Presentation of Nativity Play and Christmas carols;
3:00 p.m. Eagles Players, Swoop, and Santa Claus arrives to greet the children
3:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m. Gift distributed to the children

More than just a one-time party for a few hundred children, the Archbishop's Christmas Benefit for Children raises funds to support programs of Catholic Social Services that daily serve children throughout the year. Catholic Social Services assists more than 162,000 children, adults and families of all faiths throughout the five-county area of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia (Philadelphia, Bucks, Delaware, Chester and Montgomery counties).

# # #


Editor's Note: For more information or to make donation in support of the Archbishop's Christmas Benefit for Children, please visit www.archbishopschristmasbenefit.org/


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Holds 25th Annual Retirement Fund For Religious Collection

December 6, 2012

ARCHDIOCESE OF PHILADELPHIA HOLDS 25th ANNUAL
RETIREMENT FUND FOR RELIGIOUS COLLECTION


The Retirement Fund for Religious Collection will be held at parishes in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia, on the weekend of December 8-9, 2012. This annual appeal, celebrating its 25th Anniversary, is coordinated by the National Religious Retirement Office (NRRO) in Washington, D.C. and offers financial support for the day-to-day care of over 34,000 senior Catholic sisters, brothers, and religious order priests.

Last year, the faithful of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia raised over $132,000 for the Retirement Fund. In 2012 local religious orders received a combined total of over $1.2 Million dollars in financial assistance made possible by the national appeal.

The Retirement Fund for Religious Collection was initiated in 1988 by the Catholic Bishops of the United States. Proceeds are distributed to eligible religious communities to help underwrite retirement and health-care expenses. Nearly 95 percent of donations directly support senior religious and their communities.

# # #



Contact
Bonnie Olinger
Communications Assistant
215-587-3747

Celebrating Our Lady Of Guadalupe With Las Mañanitas Pilgrimage From Philadelphia Parishes To Cathedral Basilica

December 10, 2012

CELEBRATING OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE WITH
LAS MAÑANITAS

Pilgrimage from Philadelphia Parishes to Cathedral Basilica


The Hispanic Community of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia will gather in anticipation of the feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe (December 12th) to celebrate Las Mañanitas (a traditional serenading of Our Lady on the vigil of her feast day) followed by Mass. Bishop John J. McIntyre will be the celebrant and homilist.

Tuesday, December 11, 2012
8:45 p.m. Procession
9:00 p.m. Mass (full schedule below)
Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Faithful from several parishes in the city of Philadelphia will process to the Cathedral on foot.
The celebration will conclude with an indoor procession in the Cathedral and a presentation of roses to Our Lady of Guadalupe. All are invited to attend.

Pilgrims from Saint Joan of Arc Parish, Visitation B.V.M Parish, Saint Michael Parish, and Saint Peter the Apostle Parish are expected to process on foot from North Philadelphia to the Cathedral. They will be accompanied by a live band beginning at Visitation B.V.M. Parish as they process south.

Parishioners from Saint Thomas Aquinas and Annunciation B.V.M. in South Philadelphia will process from Saint Thomas Aquinas Church to the Cathedral. Saint Thomas is located at 1719 Morris Street, Philadelphia, PA 19145.

4:00 p.m.: Parishioners depart from Saint Joan of Arc Parish (2025 E. Atlantic Street, Philadelphia, PA 19134)
down Frankford Avenue to Tiago Street.
4:30 p.m.: Visitation parishioners depart from "B" St. and Lehigh Ave. The Procession picks up Saint Peter the Apostle
(2nd St. and Girard Ave.) and Saint Michael parishioners (2nd and Jefferson Sts.) Expected arrival time is 8:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m.: Rosary at Saint Thomas Aquinas Parish
7:00 p.m.: Procession from Saint Thomas Aquinas Parish to the Cathedral
8:00 p.m.: Arrival at the Cathedral and commencement of Las Mañanitas (serenading by el Mariachi Flores and the faithful)
9:00 p.m.: Mass with Mariachi Music

Parishioners from the Chapel of the Miraculous Medal (La Milagrosa) will depart from 19th Street and Spring Garden Avenue to the Cathedral at 7:30 p.m. traveling down 19th Street.

# # #


Editor's Note: Procession times may be subject to change. For more information, please contact the Office for Hispanic Catholics at 215-667-2820.

Procession Route for Parishes in North Philadelphia:
Saint Joan of Arc parishioners will take Atlantic Street to Frankford Ave., Frankford Ave. to Tiago St., travel east on Tioga to Aramingo Ave., travel down Aramingo Ave. to Girard Ave., take Girard Ave. to 2nd St. where the group will meet up with pilgrims from Visitation Parish. Fallow Visitation Parish route down to the Cathedral.

From Visitation Parish the procession will travel west on Lehigh Ave., down 2nd Street, meet Saint Peter the Apostle parishioners at 2nd St. and Girard Ave., continue on 2nd Street past Saint Michael Parish (where Saint Michael parishioners will join the procession), turning right on Spring Garden, and left onto 17th Street to the Cathedral.

Parishioners from the Chapel of the Miraculous Medal La Milagrosa will depart to the Cathedral at 8:00 p.m. from 19th Street and Spring Garden Avenue traveling down 19th Street.

Procession Route for Parishes in South Philadelphia:
Saint Thomas Aquinas and Annunciation B.V.M. parishioners will process from Saint Thomas Aquinas Parish (1719 Morris Street, Philadelphia 19145) turn right onto 18th Street to the Cathedral.


Contact
Jhoselyn Martinez
Communications Specialist
215-587-3747

16th Annual Blessing Of The Nativity Scene In Love Park

December 14, 2012

16th Annual Blessing of the Nativity Scene in Love Park


Bishop John J. McIntyre will preside over the 16th annual blessing of the Nativity Scene at Love Park in Philadelphia. This annual event is organized by the Christmas Creche Committee and sponsored by the Ancient Order of Hibernians and the Knights of Columbus.


Wednesday, December 19, 2012
3:00 p.m.
Love Park across from City Hall



In addition to the blessing, students from St. Francis Xavier Parish Elementary School in Philadelphia will perform traditional Christmas carols.


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Contact
Bonnie Olinger
Communications Assistant
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column:Advent, Suffering And The Promise Of Joy

December 17, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
ADVENT, SUFFERING AND THE PROMISE OF JOY


Scripture is a love story, the story of God's love for humanity. But it's a real story filled with real people. It's not a fairytale. In Scripture, as in the real world, evil things happen to innocent persons. The wicked seem to thrive. Cruelty and suffering are common.

The Psalmist cries out to heaven again and again for justice; Job is crushed by misfortune; Herod murders blameless infants; Jesus is nailed to a cross. God is good, but we human beings are free, and being free, we help fashion the nature of our world with the choices we make. This is why evil is frightening, but it's not incomprehensible. We know it from intimate experience. What we never quite expect is for our private sins, multiplied and fermented by millions of lives with the same or similar "little" sins, to somehow feed the kind of evil that walks into a Connecticut school and guns down 26 innocent lives, 20 of them children.

Thirteen years ago, as archbishop of Denver, I helped bury some of the victims of the Columbine High School massacre. Nothing is more helpless or heart-breaking than to sit with parents who kissed their children goodbye in the morning and will never see them alive again in this world. The pain of loss is excruciating. Words of comfort all sound empty. The victims in the Sandy Hook massacre were even younger and more numerous than those at Columbine, and if such intense sorrow could be measured, the suffering of the Connecticut family members left behind might easily be worse. With such young lives cut so short, every parental memory of an absent child will be precious -- compounded by a hunger for more time and more memories that will never happen. This is why we need to keep the grieving families so urgently in our hearts and prayers.

People will ask, "How could a loving God allow such wickedness?" Every life lost in Connecticut was unique, precious and irreplaceable. But the evil was routine; every human generation is rich with it. Why does God allow war? Why does God allow hunger? Why does God allow the kind of poverty that strips away the dignity of millions of people in countries around the world?

All of these questions sound reasonable, and yet they're all evasions. We might as well ask, "Why does God allow us to be free?" We have the gift of being loved by a Creator who seeks our love in return; and being loved, we will never be coerced by the One who loves us. God gives us the dignity of freedom - freedom to choose between right and wrong, a path of life or a path of death. We are not the inevitable products of history or economics or any other determinist equation. We're free, and therefore we're responsible for both the beauty and the suffering we help make. Why does God allow wickedness? He allows it because we - or others just like us - choose it. The only effective antidote to the wickedness around us is to live differently from this moment forward. We make the future beginning now.

In these final days of Advent, the Church urges us to lift up our hearts and prepare to rejoice. There's nothing remotely naïve in this call to joy; the Church knows the harshness of the world far too well for empty pieties. The evil in the world is bitter and brutal, but it's not new. Nor, in the light of human history, is it a surprise. Yet in the Old Testament, the Song of Songs tells us that "love is strong as death," and in God's redeeming plan, love is stronger than death. The surprise is the persistence of God's fidelity and mercy. The surprise is that, despite our sins, we still long to be the people God intended us to be.

Christmas is the birthday of Jesus Christ, our Emmanuel, a name that means "God with us." The surprise is that God sends his own Son into a dark world to bring us light and hope. So it has been with every generation since Bethlehem. So it remains -- even now.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput Calls On Parishes To Join In Moment Of Remembrance For<br /> Victims Of Sandy Hook Tragedy All 256 Parishes In The Archdiocese Of Philadelphia Asked To Toll Their Bells Tomorrow Morning

December 20, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT CALLS ON PARISHES TO JOIN IN MOMENT OF REMEMBRANCE FOR
VICTIMS OF SANDY HOOK TRAGEDY

All 256 parishes in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia asked to toll their bells tomorrow morning


Archbishop Charles J. Chaput, O.F.M. Cap. has asked all 256 parishes in the five-county Archdiocese of Philadelphia to honor the day of mourning called for by the governor of Connecticut.

Catholic churches throughout the Philadelphia region will ring their bells 26 times tomorrow morning at 9:30 a.m., representing one toll in honor of each life taken in last week's tragic shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School.

Writing in his column on CatholicPhill.com earlier this week, Archbishop Chaput said, "The pain of loss is excruciating. Words of comfort all sound empty. The victims in the Sandy Hook massacre were even younger and more numerous than those at Columbine, and if such intense sorrow could be measured, the suffering of the Connecticut family members left behind might easily be worse. With such young lives cut so short, every parental memory of an absent child will be precious -- compounded by a hunger for more time and more memories that will never happen. This is why we need to keep the grieving families so urgently in our hearts and prayers."

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Editor's Note: The full text of Archbishop Chaput's column from December 17th can be found at www.CatholicPhilly.com or http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Celebrate Christmas Mass At The Cathedral Basilica Of Saints Peter And Paul

December 21, 2012

CELEBRATE CHRISTMAS MASS
AT THE CATHEDRAL BASILICA OF SAINTS PETER AND PAUL


Schedule of Christmas Eve Masses and Christmas Day Masses


Christmas Eve and Christmas Day Masses at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul are a special gathering for Catholics in the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. All are welcome to celebrate the Nativity of Our Lord at the mother church of the Archdiocese.

Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul
18th Street and Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA 19103


Monday, December 24, 2012:

- Beginning at 11:00 p.m. - The Cathedral Basilica Choir and the Cathedral Basilica Brass Quintet, Timpani and Organ will provide carols and anthems for the Christmas Solemnity. This will also include the Christmas portion of MESSIAH by G.F. Handel
- 12:00 a.m. - Solemn Midnight Mass celebrated with music provided by the Cathedral Basilica Choir and the Cathedral Basilica Brass Quintet, Violins, Timpani and Organ.

Additional Christmas Eve Masses will be celebrated in the Cathedral Basilica at 5:00 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
Music at the 7:30 p.m. Mass, beginning at 7:00 p.m. will be provided by the Archdiocesan Boys Choir of Philadelphia and instruments.

Tuesday, December 25, 2012:

- 10:00 a.m. - Solemn Mass with music provided by the Cathedral Basilica Choir and two trumpets, violins, timpani and Organ.

Additional Christmas Day Masses will be celebrated in the Cathedral Basilica at 8:00 a.m. and 12:00 p.m.

# # #


Editor's Note: There will not be a mult-box feed for any of the Christmas Eve or Christmas Day Masses. Media planning to cover any Mass at the Cathedral Basilica of Saints Peter and Paul are asked to call the Cathedral rectory at 215-561-1313 and leave a message.


Contact
Kenneth Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747

Archbishop Chaput's Weekly Column: Christmas And The Reason For Our Joy

December 22, 2012

ARCHBISHOP CHAPUT'S WEEKLY COLUMN:
CHRISTMAS AND THE REASON FOR OUR JOY


"And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God and saying, 'Glory to God in the highest, and on earth peace among men with whom he is pleased'" (Lk 2:12-14). According to the evangelist, the angel "said" this. But Christianity has always understood that the speech of angels is actually a song, in which all the glory of the great joy they proclaim becomes tangibly present. And so, from that moment, the angels' song of praise has never gone silent. It continues down the centuries in constantly new forms, and it resounds ever anew at the celebration of Jesus' birth.

Benedict XVI
"Jesus of Nazareth: The Infancy Narratives"


For believers, the Christmas season doesn't end this week. It begins. So much of modern life at this time of year - its noise, its urgency, its relentless emphasis on shopping and the fatigue that always follows - can seem beyond the control of individuals. These things can easily distract us from the real reason most Americans, even today, celebrate "the holidays," the birth of Jesus Christ.

That humble birth is not a legend or seasonal fairy tale. It's a matter of historical record with real consequences for the course of human affairs. Jesus was born of Mary in Bethlehem. He grew to manhood in Nazareth, learned the trade of carpentry, preached, was crucified, died for our sins and rose again from the dead. The civilization we take for granted has been shaped in foundational ways by Christian faith and its ennobling of human reason and culture.

Real joy - the kind that sustains hope in the face of life's failures and sufferings, instead of evaporating like dew in the morning - has nothing to do with buying more things or winter solstices or fantastic myths. Real joy needs a grounding in fact. St. Leo the Great once described Christmas as "the birthday of life," and his words remind us that the manger in Bethlehem contained much more than generic good will. It cradled something far more intense and particular: the Word of God incarnate, the flesh and blood of God's son. Christmas is "heart-warming" because it radiates the fire of God's love. The real story of Christmas is revolutionary and true, and it ends not in a January white sale, but in an empty cross and tomb - the glory of our redemption.

This year, in the days of the Christmas season, let's turn off the noise and turn our hearts instead to the narratives of Christ's birth in the Gospels of Luke and Matthew. The Prince of Peace is with us. In his life, God invites us to eternal life. This is the source of our happiness. This is our reason to celebrate.

May God grant all of you and your families a wonderful Christmas season of joy and hope, and a new year of happiness. And please pray for me as I pray, every day, for you.

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Editor's Note: Columns will be published each week on www.CatholicPhilly.com and can also be found at http://archphila.org/archbishop-chaput/statements/statements.php.


Contact
Kenneth A. Gavin
Associate Director of Communications
215-587-3747